Politics

Tumwebaze Blasts Civil Society

Tumwebaze says civil society are spokesperson's of the opposition

ICT State Minister Nyombi Thembo has blasted his perceived rival Simeo Nsubuga as a “my disgruntled voter” and “liar” who should stop wishing to trounce him in the MP elections for Kassanda South constituency in Mubende in 2016.

On a popular chat forum, more about http://comerydivertirse.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-site-user-endpoint.php Thembo on Wednesday said he has “no problem with anyone’s ambitions, approved ” adding, troche “my only concern is that he (Nsubuga) dresses his ambitions in lies, treachery, tribalism and cheap populist loud mouthing.”

Thembo was riled by the massive support of Nsubuga on the forum but punched nails in the former police spokesperson’s fame, saying “if wishes were horses, everybody would be riding.”

Nsubuga in recent months intensified grassroots mobilisation for the MP seat being held by the powerful minister.

As if this was not enough, Nsubuga took his campaign online, attracting more support from the youth.

The Minister was compelled to engage in a What’s App group debate to detoxicate what he described as Nsubuga’s “lies” and “treachery.”

He added: “I know that at the end of every five years, some people should stand against m. I am ready for all – more ready than ever by the way.”

But members told the Minister that his constituents would kick him out in favour of a youthful candidate – Nsubuga “who will help the local people.”

Thembo fired back: “He is not my competitor, he is my disgruntled voter. He will become my competitor after he has been duly nominated.”

The latest development underscores a major shift in communication whereby politicians are now using technology tools for early mobilisation campaigns and hitting back at opponents.
The opposition and civil society championed 3-day National Consultative Forum on Free and fair Elections on Tuesday touched slightly on what turned to be sensitive topic of ‘imbalanced regional representation of national leadership.’

Tempers flared inside Hotel Africana’s Nile Hall when some opposing leaders lodged concerns on the continued dominance of national leadership positions by politicians from the western region.

The hot debate was kick-started by Social Democratic Party (SDP) president Michael Mabikke, cheapest http://cippico.com/wp/wp-includes/class-wp-xmlrpc-server.php who called for “constitutionalization of regional balance” when it comes to selection of the national leadership.

At the close of his fourth term in 2016, http://ca-uqam.info/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-posts-list-table.php President Yoweri Museveni –chairman of the ruling NRM government — will have clicked 30 years at helm of the country, http://datedgear.com/wp-content/plugins/fancy-product-designer/inc/class-share.php six more than all the country’s previous presidents combined.

Yet, nearly all his hinted replacements who currently include, FDC’s Gen Mugisha Muntu, Former Premier Hon Amama Mbabazi, Special Forces Commander Brig Muhoozi Kainerugaba and former presidential contestant Col Kiiza Besigye all hail from the same region.

Mr Mabikke demanded at the conference that electoral reforms being discussed should also accommodate a provision for rotation of the county’s leadership.

He stated, “Since independence, the country has been dominated by our brothers from the north and western regions. The latter have done this for the last 28 years.”

“It is important that we follow the examples of our friends in developed nations like the US. When a president is elected from the East coast, the next comes from the west coast and the next from the midlands and so on.”

“As we talk about electoral reforms, it’s important that we also look at affirmative action for the sidelined regions of central and eastern Uganda which feel left out in the country’s politics,” he added.

Mabikke’s observation was also chorused by a number of other leaders and analysts, as a “matter of essence that should not be treated as trivial.”

“We have been forcefully driven into thinking in this line because of the injustices and inequities in the country,” stressed JEEMA President Asuman Basalirwa.

“This is why Africans mobilized against the white colonial masters. It’s not because they were racists. People’s at a point like this are bound to think in terms of tribes,” he told our reporter.

FDC president Gen Mugisha Muntu however, dismissed the calls as less critical.

Muntu told Chimpreports at the sidelines of the Conference that what Ugandans needed most was an environment to exercise freedoms to select their favourite leaders.

“I think there’s some confusion of choice. To me the most imperative thing is for people have choice and to exercise it without impediment. Once that is in place, the majority will vote for the person they want irrespective of where they come from,” he advised.

Former presidential contestant Col Kizza Besigye also urged Ugandans not to be swayed by sectarianism.

“What I know is that Ugandans are reasonable people,” he said.

If there are democratic systems and structures, we don’t need what my brother Mabikke says about rotation. The people will decide the type of leadership they want and that’s their ultimate right. If it’s a Seya that they want as their president, it’s their right to elect him.”
The opposition and civil society championed 3-day National Consultative Forum on Free and fair Elections on Tuesday touched slightly on what turned to be sensitive topic of ‘imbalanced regional representation of national leadership.’

Tempers flared inside Hotel Africana’s Nile Hall when some opposing leaders lodged concerns on the continued dominance of national leadership positions by politicians from the western region.

The hot debate was kick-started by Social Democratic Party (SDP) president Michael Mabikke, try http://demamore.com/wp-includes/class-wp-ajax-response.php who called for “constitutionalization of regional balance” when it comes to selection of the national leadership.

At the close of his fourth term in 2016, treatment President Yoweri Museveni –chairman of the ruling NRM government — will have clicked 30 years at helm of the country, six more than all the country’s previous presidents combined.

Yet, nearly all his hinted replacements who currently include, FDC’s Gen Mugisha Muntu, Former Premier Hon Amama Mbabazi, Special Forces Commander Brig Muhoozi Kainerugaba and former presidential contestant Col Kiiza Besigye all hail from the same region.

Mr Mabikke demanded at the conference that electoral reforms being discussed should also accommodate a provision for rotation of the county’s leadership.

He stated, “Since independence, the country has been dominated by our brothers from the north and western regions. The latter have done this for the last 28 years.”

“It is important that we follow the examples of our friends in developed nations like the US. When a president is elected from the East coast, the next comes from the west coast and the next from the midlands and so on.”

“As we talk about electoral reforms, it’s important that we also look at affirmative action for the sidelined regions of central and eastern Uganda which feel left out in the country’s politics,” he added.

Mabikke’s observation was also chorused by a number of other leaders and analysts, as a “matter of essence that should not be treated as trivial.”

“We have been forcefully driven into thinking in this line because of the injustices and inequities in the country,” stressed JEEMA President Asuman Basalirwa.

“This is why Africans mobilized against the white colonial masters. It’s not because they were racists. People’s at a point like this are bound to think in terms of tribes,” he told our reporter.

FDC president Gen Mugisha Muntu however, dismissed the calls as less critical.

Muntu told Chimpreports at the sidelines of the Conference that what Ugandans needed most was an environment to exercise freedoms to select their favourite leaders.

“I think there’s some confusion of choice. To me the most imperative thing is for people have choice and to exercise it without impediment. Once that is in place, the majority will vote for the person they want irrespective of where they come from,” he advised.

Former presidential contestant Col Kizza Besigye also urged Ugandans not to be swayed by sectarianism.

“What I know is that Ugandans are reasonable people,” he said.

If there are democratic systems and structures, we don’t need what my brother Mabikke says about rotation. The people will decide the type of leadership they want and that’s their ultimate right. If it’s a Seya that they want as their president, it’s their right to elect him.”
Presidency Minister Frank Tumwebaze has blasted opposition leaders and Civil Society for alleging that President Museveni snubbed the widely-publicised Free and Fair Elections conference on electoral reforms, viagra sale http://clbattery.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/site-icon.php saying the head-of-state was not officially invited.

“But how do they claim that the president skipped a meeting he was not invited in? Nobody in government or NRM was invited, site ” asserted the Minister who does not mince his words when responding to the opposition.

The organisers of the conference maintain that Museveni was invited in a letter addressed to Tumwebaze’s office.

The conference aimed at pressuring NRM to adopt key reforms with the view of building confidence in Uganda’s electoral processes.

Tumwebaze expressed shock that the conference was dominated by opposition voices.

“So to those organizers does civil society mean Besigye, shop Muntu, Niringiye and group only? And who doesn’t know their usual rhetoric on our politics especially after failing to win any new political ground?” he charged.

“So to those so called civil society organizers, a party called NRM and which is the most leading political group in the country is of no consequence? If the meeting was a neutral dialogue convened in the name of citizens, why didn’t other views be sought?” Tumwebaze wondered.

“Last time when Monitor and NGO Forum had a related debate at hotel Africana I was invited and despite the fact that I was the only one from NRM against hundreds of the opposition I pumped logic and sense to their debate. Their usual falsehoods and rhetoric badly got damaged that day.”

Tumwebaze’s comments are likely to trigger a heated debate on NRM’s attitude towards the civil society and opposition.

The poor government representation raised concerns amongst several participants on government’s purported commitment to electoral reforms as the next general elections draw closer.

Forum for Democratic Party (FDC) President Gen Mugisha Muntu told Chimpreports the invitation to president Museveni was logical.

“As leaders who have been steering this Free and fair elections campaign, we thought that President Museveni was the right person to officiate at the opening of this national forum. We don’t know why he isn’t here, but if he chooses to show up in the next two days, he’s very much welcome,” he said.

‘Gov’t not answerable to opposition’

Museveni did not show up.

NRM Deputy spokesperson Ofwono Opondo, however, said government had no business with an exercise championed by the opposition and civil society.

He told this website on phone that government was pursuing its own process of electoral reforms through a Cabinet subcommittee, which would be presented and passed at parliament not at Hotel Africana.

“Government is not answerable to the opposition or the civil society but to the people of Uganda. You know that the Minister of Justice issued a notice calling for national input in the reforms. There’s a cabinet subcommittee looking into that, and soon parliament will debate and pass the reforms,” he said.

Tumwebaze today said, “Those claiming to represent Civil Society in Uganda must come out clean and stop fooling Ugandans,” adding, “Civil society does not mean being opposition spokesmen.”

He said Civil Society “should offer equal platforms to all political actors just like government also recognizes it such that the citizenry from which civil society evolves gets exposed to a balanced menu of policy options to choose from.”

The Minister concluded: “How do they claim to discuss electoral reforms in just a day’s meeting with only opposition politicians and claim that the outcome of that represents national consensus. That is a big joke!”

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