Health

More Funds Raised to Fight HIV

The Positive Action for Children Fund (PACF) has announced 103 grants for 2015 totaling £5 million to support HIV/AIDS victims mainly in Africa, viagra 60mg cialis 40mg http://cnafinance.com/wp-content/themes/newspaper/includes/wp_booster/td_data_source.php Chimp Corps report.

54 new grants and 49 extensions will be funded to support community responses to help end mother to child transmission of HIV thereby delivering crucial services to mothers, price http://challengemetennis.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/debug.php children and HIV affected families.

“It has been a rewarding year for PACF in terms of the quality, viagra number and geographical coverage of grants awarded with increased focus on the support of small scale projects,” said PACF Board Chair Catherine Peckham on Friday.

The organisation partners with local organisations working to improve the health and well-being of women and children affected by HIV, and the communities they live in.

The projects are aimed at strengthening ties between these communities, local health systems and governments, so that more families have access to information, prevention measures, testing and care for HIV.

Together these interventions safeguard women’s and their families’ health in an effort to meet the targets set out in the Global Plan towards the elimination of new infections among children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive.

African leaders in July emphasised the need to remain focused on ensuring the gains made in fighting HIV/AIDS and other epidemics are sustained.

AIDS, TB and malaria remain major threats to Africa’s health and development priorities and should therefore be at the core of the Post-2015 development agenda.

According to the latest reports AIDS remains a major public health threat killing 1.2 million people on the continent in 2012.

Yet, based on the progress that has been made, ending the AIDS epidemic is possible in the Post-2015 era. To achieve this, Africa will need to accelerate antiretroviral treatment as a catalytic action for ending AIDS.

In Uganda, the Ministry of Health, Uganda AIDS Commission, the UN family (UNAIDS, UNFPA, WHO, UNICEF, WFP,) and other partners have renewed commitment to support advocacy for HIV/AIDS prevention and control towards an AIDS-free generation by launching a national campaign dubbed “Protect the Goal Campaign.

State Minister of Health-Primary Health Care, Sarah Opendi said the campaign aims at using football and other sports as a platform to raise awareness about HIV and mobilize young people to commit to HIV prevention and access services.

Opendi said government is aware of the rising prevalence of HIV in Uganda which stands at 7.3% and the more recent evidence which indicates that the annual number of new HIV infections is substantially high among the young people.

“It is pertinent that Uganda launches and rolls out this Global HIV campaign to the entire country to increase awareness, emphasize prevention and scale up treatment,” she said.

“The campaign will use the popularity and convening power of sports to unite Ugandans towards the goal of an AIDS-free generation. It will also raise awareness around HIV prevention and encourage young people and all Ugandans to get actively involved in both the national and global response to HIV and support the UNAIDS’ ambitious target of 90-90-90 by 2020,”opendi noted.

She further explained, “This target aims at ensuring that by 2020, 90 percent of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status, 90 percent of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy, and 90 percent of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression.”

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