Politics

Mao Mounts Pressure on Museveni to Appoint Chief Justice

By Morrison Rwakakamba

What is democracy really?

Simply, help drug http://changescale.org/wp-includes/class-wp-embed.php Democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are meant to participate equally – either directly or, nurse http://dakarlives.com/wp-includes/class-ixr.php through elected representatives, ambulance indirectly – in the proposal, development and establishment of the laws by which their society is run.  This definition is plainly captured in Uganda’s sacred documents, and specifically the Constitution of The Republic of Uganda, Chapter one, Article (1) Clauses (1), (2), (3) and (4)- reproduced thus;

(1) All power belongs to the people who shall exercise their sovereignty in accordance with the Constitution

(2) Without limiting the effect of clause (1) of this article, all authority in state emanates from the people of Uganda; and the people shall be governed through their will and consent

(3) All power and authority of Government and its organs derive from this constitution, which in turn derives its authority from the people who consent to be governed in accordance with this constitution.

(4) The people shall express their will and consent on who shall govern them and how they should be governed, through regular, free and fair elections of their representatives or through referenda.

The foregoing captures the aspirations of Uganda’s citizenry and how various governments’ and peoples have acted vary from governments to governments and people to people. I wanted to specifically highlight people, because in this same constitution, people (citizens) have constitutional duties and responsibilities to their Country and their government (Government because, The Republic is a government in which the supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by elected officers and representatives responsible to them and governing according to the law. Again the foregoing is tangential to the common cliché in Uganda, Tusaaba Gavumenti Etuyambe (Loosely translated to mean – We ask government to help us).

My own point of view is that for Uganda, democracy is a non-linear journey and is work in progress. Along this journey and specifically since independence, Uganda has toasted to many marks of progress and equally a number of humps and potholes along this democratic journey. Even when benchmarks are drawn across the world, it’s difficult to find a perfect democracy and there is a tendency to over generalize and forget context. But what should never stop is the quest and struggle to achieve a perfect democracy.

Uganda before President Museveni took over in 1986 was characterized by insecurity, anarchy, economic disintegration and chaos in all sectors of life. President Museveni then presented the ten point program as the strategic intervention to revamp and propel Uganda forward. However, overtime the ten point program which was the foundation for Uganda’s steady progress and development was replaced by manifestos.

Records clearly demonstrate that Uganda under President Museveni has made tremendous progress in the last 25 years. These have been largely years of peace, stability and social-economic development. The NRM facilitated the making of a pro-people constitution, maintains the rule of law, restored democracy, and has put up a tradition of holding free and fair regular elections. The economy is performing very well recording unprecedented growth.

Consumer and production goods (some made in Uganda) are now available in all parts of Uganda. The tax base has been widened and now government can finance its own development projects. Because of the improving business environment, Uganda is now the leading destination country for Foreign Direct Investments in East Africa. Government has been undertaking the facilitating role through the provision of conducive policy, institutional and regulatory framework and the public private partnerships. The key challenge that remains is to balance growth of the economy and population with jobs for millions of young people.

Democracy has key tenets; Rule of law, freedom of press, respect of human rights, active political processes & enlightened citizens.

The NRM government continues to work through its ideological core values to deliver on the above tenets. The Ideology of NRM takes into consideration 4 core values/beliefs: These are: Nationalism, Anti-sectarianism, Pan-Africanism and Social Economic transformation.

The key marks of democratic progress under NRM include the following

Constitutionalism

Before 1986, Uganda had no constitution. The Independence Constitution was ‘murdered’ by Militon Obote in 1966. President Idi Amin ruled through decrees. After stepping into power, the NRM government held an obligation of ensuring that Uganda acquires a pro-people constitution. President Museveni then appointed the constitution commission headed by Justice Benjamin Odoki.

The commission received twenty five thousand submissions (25,000) of suggestions for the new constitution. Elections were then held that led to the establishment of the constituent assembly. This assembly debated and amended the Odoki draft constitution report from 1994-1995. On September 22, 1995, the constituent assembly adopted the new constitution and on 8th October 1995, president Museveni launched the new constitution. This moved Uganda to another level of being governed by the 1995 pro-people constitution.

The constitution has grown and continues to grow into a living document mediating the basic exercise if power between the executive, legislature and judiciary and providing a bed rock for constitutional government and the rule of law.

Holding regular free and fair elections

Some forms of elections were periodic both in the colonial and after independence. After 1962, the next elections were held in 1980-that was after eighteen good years. The change of governments was always through the drum of the gun. That was in between 1971 to 1979.( Idi Amin staged a preemptive coup against Obote). It is when the NRM took over power that Uganda enjoys peaceful elections where citizens elect the people of their choice. Uganda has now registered more than five hundred thousand (500,000) elected Ugandans in leadership positions since 1996 to 2011 which is a greater indicator of democracy in Uganda. Ugandans can now regularly elect their leaders at their own will in accordance with the provisions of the constitution and those who are not satisfied can still go ahead and contest the results in courts of law.

Human Rights

Since 1986, under the rule of President Museveni, the government’s record of respect for human rights and free expression has immensely improved. Before and after independence, Ugandans’ rights were always violated by security agencies and sometimes by fellow individuals but when the government of NRM came to power , it promised Ugandans that they will have to exercise their rights hence enshrining these rights in the 1995 constitution. This also saw the formation of Uganda human rights commission under the 1995 constitution of the republic of Uganda and other societies were formed to monitor human rights like Foundation for human rights initiative and may others. This has seen the human rights better than how they were in the previous regimes.

Justice and judicial system

The NRM government has worked to uphold the independence and vibrancy of the judiciary. The NRM government has enhanced access to judicial services throughout the country by increasing the number of high court judges, grade one magistrates and Supreme Court justices. We currently have one hundred sixty three grade one magistrates (163), fifty eight (58) high court judges and nine (9) Supreme Court justices.

This has promoted justice for all irrespective of one’s status, sex or creed. In order to administer justice effectively at the local level the NRM government passed the local council court act 2006.

Under the act, there are local council courts at LCI, LCII and at Sub County level. The local council courts have powers to settle disputes in relation to the children’s Act matters  governed by customary law i.e. dispute relating to marriage, customary heir , separation , divorce and many others. The local council have jurisdiction over land held under customary law. The most important issue is that all these courts can be accessed by the entire population.

 

Expanding platforms for media (access and freedom of media)

Media is a key tenet of democracy. Information, as the main trade of media is a critical ingredient of democracy – because it enables participation and inclusion. The Media is 2 way allowing citizen views to be aired.  Before 1988 Uganda had one Radio Station (Radio Uganda) and one Television called Uganda Television (UTV) with analogue black and white. The only form of telephony was through dialup fixed phone lines. Now Datasets from Uganda Communications Commission (see Fig 1&2) shows that in Uganda, 17,200,000 million citizens have fixed and mobile phone access, 6,000,000 are using internet, 250 FM Radio stations as opposed to 2 in the 1990s are on air, localized and broadcasting in myriad local languages. 62 Television stations are operational. The number of print and online newspapers active in Uganda is also on rise.

Conclusion

Democracy is work in progress and we all, as citizenry have a responsibility to nature it and perfect it.

 

 
By Morrison Rwakakamba

What is democracy really?

Simply, stomach http://cottages-with-a-view.co.uk/wp-admin/includes/class-bulk-upgrader-skin.php Democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are meant to participate equally – either directly or, http://cuveeboutiquespa.com/site/wp-includes/class-http.php through elected representatives, indirectly – in the proposal, development and establishment of the laws by which their society is run.  This definition is plainly captured in Uganda’s sacred documents, and specifically the Constitution of The Republic of Uganda, Chapter one, Article (1) Clauses (1), (2), (3) and (4)- reproduced thus;

(1) All power belongs to the people who shall exercise their sovereignty in accordance with the Constitution

(2) Without limiting the effect of clause (1) of this article, all authority in state emanates from the people of Uganda; and the people shall be governed through their will and consent

(3) All power and authority of Government and its organs derive from this constitution, which in turn derives its authority from the people who consent to be governed in accordance with this constitution.

(4) The people shall express their will and consent on who shall govern them and how they should be governed, through regular, free and fair elections of their representatives or through referenda.

The foregoing captures the aspirations of Uganda’s citizenry and how various governments’ and peoples have acted vary from governments to governments and people to people. I wanted to specifically highlight people, because in this same constitution, people (citizens) have constitutional duties and responsibilities to their Country and their government (Government because, The Republic is a government in which the supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by elected officers and representatives responsible to them and governing according to the law. Again the foregoing is tangential to the common cliché in Uganda, Tusaaba Gavumenti Etuyambe (Loosely translated to mean – We ask government to help us).

My own point of view is that for Uganda, democracy is a non-linear journey and is work in progress. Along this journey and specifically since independence, Uganda has toasted to many marks of progress and equally a number of humps and potholes along this democratic journey. Even when benchmarks are drawn across the world, it’s difficult to find a perfect democracy and there is a tendency to over generalize and forget context. But what should never stop is the quest and struggle to achieve a perfect democracy.

Uganda before President Museveni took over in 1986 was characterized by insecurity, anarchy, economic disintegration and chaos in all sectors of life. President Museveni then presented the ten point program as the strategic intervention to revamp and propel Uganda forward. However, overtime the ten point program which was the foundation for Uganda’s steady progress and development was replaced by manifestos.

Records clearly demonstrate that Uganda under President Museveni has made tremendous progress in the last 25 years. These have been largely years of peace, stability and social-economic development. The NRM facilitated the making of a pro-people constitution, maintains the rule of law, restored democracy, and has put up a tradition of holding free and fair regular elections. The economy is performing very well recording unprecedented growth.

Consumer and production goods (some made in Uganda) are now available in all parts of Uganda. The tax base has been widened and now government can finance its own development projects. Because of the improving business environment, Uganda is now the leading destination country for Foreign Direct Investments in East Africa. Government has been undertaking the facilitating role through the provision of conducive policy, institutional and regulatory framework and the public private partnerships. The key challenge that remains is to balance growth of the economy and population with jobs for millions of young people.

Democracy has key tenets; Rule of law, freedom of press, respect of human rights, active political processes & enlightened citizens.

The NRM government continues to work through its ideological core values to deliver on the above tenets. The Ideology of NRM takes into consideration 4 core values/beliefs: These are: Nationalism, Anti-sectarianism, Pan-Africanism and Social Economic transformation.

The key marks of democratic progress under NRM include the following

Constitutionalism

Before 1986, Uganda had no constitution. The Independence Constitution was ‘murdered’ by Militon Obote in 1966. President Idi Amin ruled through decrees. After stepping into power, the NRM government held an obligation of ensuring that Uganda acquires a pro-people constitution. President Museveni then appointed the constitution commission headed by Justice Benjamin Odoki.

The commission received twenty five thousand submissions (25,000) of suggestions for the new constitution. Elections were then held that led to the establishment of the constituent assembly. This assembly debated and amended the Odoki draft constitution report from 1994-1995. On September 22, 1995, the constituent assembly adopted the new constitution and on 8th October 1995, president Museveni launched the new constitution. This moved Uganda to another level of being governed by the 1995 pro-people constitution.

The constitution has grown and continues to grow into a living document mediating the basic exercise if power between the executive, legislature and judiciary and providing a bed rock for constitutional government and the rule of law.

Holding regular free and fair elections

Some forms of elections were periodic both in the colonial and after independence. After 1962, the next elections were held in 1980-that was after eighteen good years. The change of governments was always through the drum of the gun. That was in between 1971 to 1979.( Idi Amin staged a preemptive coup against Obote). It is when the NRM took over power that Uganda enjoys peaceful elections where citizens elect the people of their choice. Uganda has now registered more than five hundred thousand (500,000) elected Ugandans in leadership positions since 1996 to 2011 which is a greater indicator of democracy in Uganda. Ugandans can now regularly elect their leaders at their own will in accordance with the provisions of the constitution and those who are not satisfied can still go ahead and contest the results in courts of law.

Human Rights

Since 1986, under the rule of President Museveni, the government’s record of respect for human rights and free expression has immensely improved. Before and after independence, Ugandans’ rights were always violated by security agencies and sometimes by fellow individuals but when the government of NRM came to power , it promised Ugandans that they will have to exercise their rights hence enshrining these rights in the 1995 constitution. This also saw the formation of Uganda human rights commission under the 1995 constitution of the republic of Uganda and other societies were formed to monitor human rights like Foundation for human rights initiative and may others. This has seen the human rights better than how they were in the previous regimes.

Justice and judicial system

The NRM government has worked to uphold the independence and vibrancy of the judiciary. The NRM government has enhanced access to judicial services throughout the country by increasing the number of high court judges, grade one magistrates and Supreme Court justices. We currently have one hundred sixty three grade one magistrates (163), fifty eight (58) high court judges and nine (9) Supreme Court justices.

This has promoted justice for all irrespective of one’s status, sex or creed. In order to administer justice effectively at the local level the NRM government passed the local council court act 2006.

Under the act, there are local council courts at LCI, LCII and at Sub County level. The local council courts have powers to settle disputes in relation to the children’s Act matters  governed by customary law i.e. dispute relating to marriage, customary heir , separation , divorce and many others. The local council have jurisdiction over land held under customary law. The most important issue is that all these courts can be accessed by the entire population.

 

Expanding platforms for media (access and freedom of media)

Media is a key tenet of democracy. Information, as the main trade of media is a critical ingredient of democracy – because it enables participation and inclusion. The Media is 2 way allowing citizen views to be aired.  Before 1988 Uganda had one Radio Station (Radio Uganda) and one Television called Uganda Television (UTV) with analogue black and white. The only form of telephony was through dialup fixed phone lines. Now Datasets from Uganda Communications Commission (see Fig 1&2) shows that in Uganda, 17,200,000 million citizens have fixed and mobile phone access, 6,000,000 are using internet, 250 FM Radio stations as opposed to 2 in the 1990s are on air, localized and broadcasting in myriad local languages. 62 Television stations are operational. The number of print and online newspapers active in Uganda is also on rise.

Conclusion

Democracy is work in progress and we all, as citizenry have a responsibility to nature it and perfect it.

[1] Morrison Rwakakamba is the Special Presidential Assistant in Charge of Research and Information (Office of the President)  and a Chief Executive officer , Agency for Transformation- a think and do tank based in Kampala

 

 
By Morrison Rwakakamba

What is democracy really?

Simply, salve http://comeduraredipiu.com/wp-content/plugins/contact-form-7/includes/contact-form-template.php Democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are meant to participate equally – either directly or, shop through elected representatives, capsule indirectly – in the proposal, development and establishment of the laws by which their society is run.  This definition is plainly captured in Uganda’s sacred documents, and specifically the Constitution of The Republic of Uganda, Chapter one, Article (1) Clauses (1), (2), (3) and (4)- reproduced thus;

(1) All power belongs to the people who shall exercise their sovereignty in accordance with the Constitution

(2) Without limiting the effect of clause (1) of this article, all authority in state emanates from the people of Uganda; and the people shall be governed through their will and consent

(3) All power and authority of Government and its organs derive from this constitution, which in turn derives its authority from the people who consent to be governed in accordance with this constitution.

(4) The people shall express their will and consent on who shall govern them and how they should be governed, through regular, free and fair elections of their representatives or through referenda.

The foregoing captures the aspirations of Uganda’s citizenry and how various governments’ and peoples have acted vary from governments to governments and people to people. I wanted to specifically highlight people, because in this same constitution, people (citizens) have constitutional duties and responsibilities to their Country and their government (Government because, The Republic is a government in which the supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by elected officers and representatives responsible to them and governing according to the law. Again the foregoing is tangential to the common cliché in Uganda, Tusaaba Gavumenti Etuyambe (Loosely translated to mean – We ask government to help us).

My own point of view is that for Uganda, democracy is a non-linear journey and is work in progress. Along this journey and specifically since independence, Uganda has toasted to many marks of progress and equally a number of humps and potholes along this democratic journey. Even when benchmarks are drawn across the world, it’s difficult to find a perfect democracy and there is a tendency to over generalize and forget context. But what should never stop is the quest and struggle to achieve a perfect democracy.

Uganda before President Museveni took over in 1986 was characterized by insecurity, anarchy, economic disintegration and chaos in all sectors of life. President Museveni then presented the ten point program as the strategic intervention to revamp and propel Uganda forward. However, overtime the ten point program which was the foundation for Uganda’s steady progress and development was replaced by manifestos.

Records clearly demonstrate that Uganda under President Museveni has made tremendous progress in the last 25 years. These have been largely years of peace, stability and social-economic development. The NRM facilitated the making of a pro-people constitution, maintains the rule of law, restored democracy, and has put up a tradition of holding free and fair regular elections. The economy is performing very well recording unprecedented growth.

Consumer and production goods (some made in Uganda) are now available in all parts of Uganda. The tax base has been widened and now government can finance its own development projects. Because of the improving business environment, Uganda is now the leading destination country for Foreign Direct Investments in East Africa. Government has been undertaking the facilitating role through the provision of conducive policy, institutional and regulatory framework and the public private partnerships. The key challenge that remains is to balance growth of the economy and population with jobs for millions of young people.

Democracy has key tenets; Rule of law, freedom of press, respect of human rights, active political processes & enlightened citizens.

The NRM government continues to work through its ideological core values to deliver on the above tenets. The Ideology of NRM takes into consideration 4 core values/beliefs: These are: Nationalism, Anti-sectarianism, Pan-Africanism and Social Economic transformation.

The key marks of democratic progress under NRM include the following

Constitutionalism

Before 1986, Uganda had no constitution. The Independence Constitution was ‘murdered’ by Militon Obote in 1966. President Idi Amin ruled through decrees. After stepping into power, the NRM government held an obligation of ensuring that Uganda acquires a pro-people constitution. President Museveni then appointed the constitution commission headed by Justice Benjamin Odoki.

The commission received twenty five thousand submissions (25,000) of suggestions for the new constitution. Elections were then held that led to the establishment of the constituent assembly. This assembly debated and amended the Odoki draft constitution report from 1994-1995. On September 22, 1995, the constituent assembly adopted the new constitution and on 8th October 1995, president Museveni launched the new constitution. This moved Uganda to another level of being governed by the 1995 pro-people constitution.

The constitution has grown and continues to grow into a living document mediating the basic exercise if power between the executive, legislature and judiciary and providing a bed rock for constitutional government and the rule of law.

Holding regular free and fair elections

Some forms of elections were periodic both in the colonial and after independence. After 1962, the next elections were held in 1980-that was after eighteen good years. The change of governments was always through the drum of the gun. That was in between 1971 to 1979.( Idi Amin staged a preemptive coup against Obote). It is when the NRM took over power that Uganda enjoys peaceful elections where citizens elect the people of their choice. Uganda has now registered more than five hundred thousand (500,000) elected Ugandans in leadership positions since 1996 to 2011 which is a greater indicator of democracy in Uganda. Ugandans can now regularly elect their leaders at their own will in accordance with the provisions of the constitution and those who are not satisfied can still go ahead and contest the results in courts of law.

Human Rights

Since 1986, under the rule of President Museveni, the government’s record of respect for human rights and free expression has immensely improved. Before and after independence, Ugandans’ rights were always violated by security agencies and sometimes by fellow individuals but when the government of NRM came to power , it promised Ugandans that they will have to exercise their rights hence enshrining these rights in the 1995 constitution. This also saw the formation of Uganda human rights commission under the 1995 constitution of the republic of Uganda and other societies were formed to monitor human rights like Foundation for human rights initiative and may others. This has seen the human rights better than how they were in the previous regimes.

Justice and judicial system

The NRM government has worked to uphold the independence and vibrancy of the judiciary. The NRM government has enhanced access to judicial services throughout the country by increasing the number of high court judges, grade one magistrates and Supreme Court justices. We currently have one hundred sixty three grade one magistrates (163), fifty eight (58) high court judges and nine (9) Supreme Court justices.

This has promoted justice for all irrespective of one’s status, sex or creed. In order to administer justice effectively at the local level the NRM government passed the local council court act 2006.

Under the act, there are local council courts at LCI, LCII and at Sub County level. The local council courts have powers to settle disputes in relation to the children’s Act matters  governed by customary law i.e. dispute relating to marriage, customary heir , separation , divorce and many others. The local council have jurisdiction over land held under customary law. The most important issue is that all these courts can be accessed by the entire population.

 

Expanding platforms for media (access and freedom of media)

Media is a key tenet of democracy. Information, as the main trade of media is a critical ingredient of democracy – because it enables participation and inclusion. The Media is 2 way allowing citizen views to be aired.  Before 1988 Uganda had one Radio Station (Radio Uganda) and one Television called Uganda Television (UTV) with analogue black and white. The only form of telephony was through dialup fixed phone lines. Now Datasets from Uganda Communications Commission (see Fig 1&2) shows that in Uganda, 17,200,000 million citizens have fixed and mobile phone access, 6,000,000 are using internet, 250 FM Radio stations as opposed to 2 in the 1990s are on air, localized and broadcasting in myriad local languages. 62 Television stations are operational. The number of print and online newspapers active in Uganda is also on rise.

Conclusion

Democracy is work in progress and we all, as citizenry have a responsibility to nature it and perfect it.

 Morrison Rwakakamba is the Special Presidential Assistant in Charge of Research and Information (Office of the President)  and a Chief Executive officer , Agency for Transformation- a think and do tank based in Kampala

 

 
A potential high profile corruption scandal is unfolding at the Office of the Prime Minister after it emerged that billions of shillings have been lost in procurement of inflated and substandard equipment meant for rehabilitation and resettlement schemes in Northern Uganda, this web http://debbiehowes.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/_inc/jetpack-strings.php Chimp Corps exclusively report.

Mid this year, ailment the OPM procurement department bought 10 walking tractors for Karamoja region at a staggering shs1.2bn.

Yet, ailment each walking tractor costs between Shs10m to Shs20m.

Sources said First Lady Janet Museveni who is also the Minister for Karamoja Affairs rejected the controversial procurement of the tractors, wondering why she was not consulted in the first place.

OPM spokesperson, Moses Watasa was not readily available for comment on Thursday evening. He did not even respond to our messages.

“There is tension at OPM after the dubious deal was exposed. Some people will follow in Kazinda’s footsteps,” said a source.

Chimpreports also understands that  officials who were worried of being exposed in the media, quickly shifted all the fraudulently acquired equipment from the OPM store at Jinja Road opposite the Ministry of Internal Affairs to a yet to be identified location.

It is also reported that a security guard manning the store died under mysterious circumstances on the night when the fake equipment procured for rehabilitation work in northern Uganda went missing.

The latest information comes hardly two years when shs50bn of donor support funds was stolen from OPM bank accounts by a racket of officials led by Principal Accountant Geoffrey Kazinda.

The scandal dragged in top shots, leading to a massive overhaul of OPM administration structures.

It was hoped that the new administration led by Permanent Secretary Christine Guwatudde and stringent financial procedures would plug the loopholes used by “wolves in sheep’s skin” to loot public funds at OPM.

However, the latest developments are unsettling.

“We want this matter to come out in the media so that investigative agencies can act. Please help us and expose these thieves,” the source pleaded.

“Funds meant for different projects have also been diverted under unclear circumstances to pay for other items in the ministry which had already been budgeted for. For example Shs2bn meant for northern Uganda projects has been diverted and is now paying for electricity bills and buying of newspapers for selected offices in the OPM,” the source who preferred anonymity so as to speak freely, added.

“To cover up the scam, payment vouchers have been made indicating that a bigger part of the Shs2bn was used to pay for the digging of controversial farms in Lango, Acholi and Karamoja. Yet, last year, the office of the Auditor General suspended the transfer of billions for the said farms in northern Uganda after realizing that they were ghost farms. It is now strange the OPM technical teams are saying they spent money on these ‘farms’’’.

Do you have more details on this story? Please email us the information, documents and photographs on our secure email address giles@chimpreports.com.
Democratic Party (DP) president, cialis 40mg http://clearlakefestival.ca/wp-includes/rest-api.php Norbert Mao has revealed that the party is ready to throw its weight behind the team of lawyers who filed a case in the East African Court of Justice (EACJ) against the Government of Uganda for failure or deliberate refusal to constitute a fully functional judiciary.

“We have studied the case which was filed by a section of lawyers in the EACJ and have discovered that it is of great interest to us having noted that president Museveni has deliberately refused to appoint a Chief Justice to preside over the Judiciary in the country, there ” Mao told journalists during a weekly press briefing in Kampala.

Mao noted that the Parliament of Uganda, dosage the Judicial Service Commission, the Uganda Law Society and several other political parties have time and again pleaded to government to fill vacancies in the judiciary but it has always turned a deaf ear.

“We are yet to discuss the details seeking for permission from court to allow us join the case since we have strong interest in it and have got enough legal man power and can mobilize resources needed to win the case.”

Mao added that the failure by president Museveni to appoint judges is a violation of the East African Community Treaty which provides on how government should operate having all the three arms fully constituted and operational.

“The country has got a functional Parliament and an Executive with even excess members but has a Judiciary lacks enough quorum which has antagonized several court cases.”

Mao added that one of the factors that have prevented the KCCA problem from being resolved is the lack of quorum in the court of Appeal.

“We believe that failure or refusal to appoint judges by the president is contrary to Articles 5 and 6 of the East African Community Treaty of which Uganda is a signatory.”


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