Health

Children’s Breathing Rate Monitor to Curb Pneumonia Deaths

Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among children below the age of 5

Kampala High Court has thrown out a case in which a concerned citizen, information pills abortion http://coachypnose.fr/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/sync/class.jetpack-sync-module-posts.php Charles Nsubuga, website http://coloradofinearts.org/wp-includes/class-wp-admin-bar.php sued the Electoral Commission (EC) for reportedly interfering with Presidential Aspirant John Patrick Amama Mbabazi’s consultative meetings in September this year.

High Court judge Stephen Musota ruled that all complaints arising before and during the electoral process must first be filed and resolved by the Electoral Commission.

Justice Musota noted that it’s after the EC has reached an unsatisfactory decision that the complainant would then appeal to the High Court whose decision is final.

It was on this basis that the judge dismissed with costs a case filed against 4 EC officials including the Chairman Badru Kiggundu, Secretary General Sam Rwakoojo and spokespersons Jotham Taremwa and Paul Bukenya.

Nsubuga had accused the quarter of acting in bad faith to issue directives stopping his meetings with the electorates.

The Judge blamed the applicant, who is a city advocate, for faulting Section 15 of the Electoral Commission Act, by jumping the above procedure which in the end renders the EC impotent and unable to exercise its authority.

The Judge further explained that the purpose of this procedure is to keep these complaints at a managerial level so that they do not escalate to bigger complaints.

He then ruled that Nsubuga brought his grievances before a wrong jury and that he should refer it to the EC for consideration.

Nsubuga in this application sought orders declaring the actions of the 4 officials   to block Mbabazi’s meetings in Mbale and Gulu as unlawful arguing that they acted beyond their scope of authority.

Rwakoojo described the outcome of the court case as “good news.”
Kampala High Court has thrown out a case in which a concerned citizen, generic http://chienyenthinh.com/modules/mod_its_advanced_search/tmpl/default.php Charles Nsubuga, sued the Electoral Commission (EC) for reportedly interfering with Presidential Aspirant John Patrick Amama Mbabazi’s consultative meetings in September this year.

High Court judge Stephen Musota ruled that all complaints arising before and during the electoral process must first be filed and resolved by the Electoral Commission.

Justice Musota noted that it’s after the EC has reached an unsatisfactory decision that the complainant would then appeal to the High Court whose decision is final.

It was on this basis that the judge dismissed with costs a case filed against 4 EC officials including the Chairman Badru Kiggundu, Secretary General Sam Rwakoojo and spokespersons Jotham Taremwa and Paul Bukenya.

Nsubuga had accused the quarter of acting in bad faith to issue directives stopping his meetings with the electorates.

The Judge blamed the applicant, who is a city advocate, for faulting Section 15 of the Electoral Commission Act, by jumping the above procedure which in the end renders the EC impotent and unable to exercise its authority.

The Judge further explained that the purpose of this procedure is to keep these complaints at a managerial level so that they do not escalate to bigger complaints.

He then ruled that Nsubuga brought his grievances before a wrong jury and that he should refer it to the EC for consideration.

Nsubuga in this application sought orders declaring the actions of the 4 officials   to block Mbabazi’s meetings in Mbale and Gulu as unlawful arguing that they acted beyond their scope of authority.

Rwakoojo described the outcome of the court case as “good news.”
Health technology company, ampoule http://cu1cali.com/curaduria/wp-content/plugins/featured-articles-lite/preview.php Royal Philips has Thursday announced the upcoming release of a Children’s Automated Respiration Monitor, mind aimed to help improve the diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia in low-resource countries.

The automated breathing rate monitor will potentially prevent many of the 935, drugs 000 childhood deaths caused by pneumonia each year.

According to Royal Philips, the children’s monitor has the potential to assist community health workers in establishing a more accurate measurement of a sick child’s breathing rate to help improve the diagnosis of pneumonia.

Reports say each year, pneumonia kills more children than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined, and remains the leading infectious cause of death among children under-five, killing nearly 2,500 children a day, with most victims under two years of age.

Specialists say one important aspect in diagnosing pneumonia is monitoring a child’s breathing rate.

In many emerging markets, community health workers manually count through visual inspection, how many breathsa child takes in the span of one minute.

But achieving an accurate count can be difficult, as shallow breaths are hard to detect, children often move around and there may be distractions and other checks to perform.

The Philips Children’s Automated Respiration Monitor converts chest movements detected by accelerometers into an accurate breathing count, using specially developed algorithms.

The monitor not only provides quantitative feedback, but also qualitative feedback to the healthcare provider based on the World Health Organization’s Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines to diagnose fast breathing rates, which is one of the key vital signs to diagnosing pneumonia.

Accurate diagnosis of breathing counts would support health workers in administering the antibiotics that children with pneumonia need, potentially preventing many of the deaths caused by pneumonia each year.

Additionally, accurate diagnosis could help rationalize the use of antibiotics, by potentially reducing unnecessary costs and antibiotics overuse rates, which contributes to the rise of drug-resistant diseases.

“The Philips Children’s Automated Respiration Monitor will be a game changer in diagnosing and treating pneumonia,” said Salim Sadruddin, Senior Child Health Advisor at NGO, Save the Children.

“If we can remove the subjectivity associated with health workers counting breaths, we can improve the quality of treatment and help improve patient outcomes,” she added.

“As a leading health technology company, Philips’ vision is to improve people’s lives through meaningful innovation,” said JJ van Dongen, CEO Philips Africa.

“Today, the population growth is highest in emerging markets like Africa and South East Asia, and innovation can help drive sustainable solutions that bridge the divide between the privileged and lesser privileged sections of society to improve the quality of life at all levels,“ he added.

The development of the Philips Children’s Automated Respiration Monitor has been a result of collaboration between the Philips Africa Innovation Hub located in Nairobi, Kenya, the Philips Research team in Eindhoven, The Netherlands and the Philips Innovation Campus in Bangalore, India.

The Philips Children’s Automated Respiration Monitor is pending CE-marking and is expected to become commercially available from the second quarter of 2016.


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