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Child Beating is Not Illegal – Justice Batema

Resident Fort Portal High Court Judge Justice David Batema has clarified that Uganda has not yet enacted any law that bars a parent from punishing and disciplining his or her child.

According to Justice Batema, order http://compuaprende.com/components/com_community/templates/jomsocial/layouts/email.profile.activitycomment.text.php many people have misinterpreted the rights of children and used them to limit parents’ control over their young children.

This he said has paved way for the rampant acts of indiscipline and crime in society today.

“In most of the cases I’m handling in court, case http://comfortzonetoronto.com/wp-includes/vars.php parents reveal that they no longer have control and capacity to discipline their children because they fear to break the law. They fear that they could be arrested and sentenced if the beat their children, viagra sale http://cfbtoman.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/likes.php ” Justice Batema.

The Judge was on Friday speaking during the Pro-Bono day celebrations held at Booma Play ground in Fort Portal.

Jusitice David Batema, the Resident Judge Fort Portal High Court

Jusitice David Batema, the Resident Judge Fort Portal High Court

The day offers an opportunity to Human rights organisations and lawyers to interact on issues of human rights and give free legal services to citizens. It was commemorated under the theme “Justice for Children”.

The Judge clarified that the existing laws only imply to people who subject children to serious corporal punishments and gravely torture them.

He said, “I ask parents not to spare the rod but punish indiscipline children at home with a stick, not to torture and batter them.”

Laws protecting children in Uganda are enshrined in Article 34 of the 1995 National Constitution as well as the 1997 Children Act.

However, despite the passing of these laws, widespread ignorance of the law has contributed to the persistent violation of children’s rights in Uganda.

UNICEF observes that these laws are “scattered in various legalese documents and are largely inaccessible to duty bearers and child actors, those charged with responsibilities to enforce children’s rights are often unaware of their responsibilities.

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