Crime & Investigation

Woman Beheaded In Her House

Reducing inequalities and the creation of work are critical for human development in the region, about it http://cooperatition.org/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-users-list-table.php according to the 2015 Human Development Report.

The report, http://creativecommons.org/wordpress/wp-includes/class-wp-comment.php “Work for Human Development” was launched on Monday in Ethiopia by Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Dessalegn, http://crcpallc.com/templates/uneedo_j25/warp/helpers/asset.php the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Helen Clark, and UNDP’s Director of the Human Development Report Office, Selim Jahan.

It promotes sustainability, equitable and decent work for all, through encouraging governments to consider work beyond jobs, such as unpaid care, voluntary, creative work and more.

Since 2000, Sub-Saharan Africa has experienced the fastest annual growth rates in the Human Development Index (HDI) among all regions – growing at an annual rate of 1.7 percent between 2000 and 2010 and 0.9 percent between 2010 and 2014.

However Sub-Saharan Africa, on average, remains in the low human development category and HDI levels are still low: a shortage of good work opportunities is preventing many from reaching their full potential and making decent livelihoods.

“Africa is experiencing higher levels of wellbeing and economic growth. Now governments must focus on better working conditions to improve lives and livelihoods, supporting the creation of jobs to sustain people and communities, and providing preconditions for greater labour participation by women and young people,” said Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant Administrator and Director of UNDP’s Regional Bureau for Africa.”

The creation of work and the expansion of choices in the region are crucial for tackling inequality, according to the 2015 report.

“Fast technological progress and deepening globalization are changing what work means today and how it is done.” said Selim Jahan, lead author of the report.

Sub-Saharan Africa has 500 million of people living in multidimensional poverty – that is three of every five in the region.

In addition, gains in human development, especially in health and education, are more unevenly distributed in Sub-Saharan Africa than in any other region in the world, as recorded by the Inequality-adjusted HDI.

According to the report, the region is facing a high cohort of young people in Africa due to population growth, addressing low literacy rates and building skills can help young people secure work opportunities.

“In a changing world, enhancing human development through work requires policy interventions. Unless action is taken, many people, particularly those already marginalized, might be left behind,” he added.

According to the Gender Inequality Index, women in Sub-Saharan Africa are severely disadvantaged.

The report also says women have fewer opportunities than men for paid work in the region.

It urges for efforts to improve women’s lives by ensuring equal pay, tackling the harassment and the social norm that exclude so many women from paid work.
Reducing inequalities and the creation of work are critical for human development in the region, troche according to the 2015 Human Development Report.

The report, healing “Work for Human Development” was launched on Monday in Ethiopia by Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Dessalegn, viagra order the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Helen Clark, and UNDP’s Director of the Human Development Report Office, Selim Jahan.

It promotes sustainability, equitable and decent work for all, through encouraging governments to consider work beyond jobs, such as unpaid care, voluntary, creative work and more.

Since 2000, Sub-Saharan Africa has experienced the fastest annual growth rates in the Human Development Index (HDI) among all regions – growing at an annual rate of 1.7 percent between 2000 and 2010 and 0.9 percent between 2010 and 2014.

However Sub-Saharan Africa, on average, remains in the low human development category and HDI levels are still low: a shortage of good work opportunities is preventing many from reaching their full potential and making decent livelihoods.

“Africa is experiencing higher levels of wellbeing and economic growth. Now governments must focus on better working conditions to improve lives and livelihoods, supporting the creation of jobs to sustain people and communities, and providing preconditions for greater labour participation by women and young people,” said Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant Administrator and Director of UNDP’s Regional Bureau for Africa.”

The creation of work and the expansion of choices in the region are crucial for tackling inequality, according to the 2015 report.

“Fast technological progress and deepening globalization are changing what work means today and how it is done.” said Selim Jahan, lead author of the report.

Sub-Saharan Africa has 500 million of people living in multidimensional poverty – that is three of every five in the region.

In addition, gains in human development, especially in health and education, are more unevenly distributed in Sub-Saharan Africa than in any other region in the world, as recorded by the Inequality-adjusted HDI.

According to the report, the region is facing a high cohort of young people in Africa due to population growth, addressing low literacy rates and building skills can help young people secure work opportunities.

“In a changing world, enhancing human development through work requires policy interventions. Unless action is taken, many people, particularly those already marginalized, might be left behind,” he added.

According to the Gender Inequality Index, women in Sub-Saharan Africa are severely disadvantaged.

The report also says women have fewer opportunities than men for paid work in the region.

It urges for efforts to improve women’s lives by ensuring equal pay, tackling the harassment and the social norm that exclude so many women from paid work.
Police in Kabarole and the district Chief Administrative Officer [CAO] have disagreed on the campaign program of one of the Presidential Candidates Col Dr Kizza Besigye of the Forum for Democratic Change (FDC).

Reports from the western district indicate that District Police Commander Musa Tibahikirana has defied the directive of the CAO Geoffrey Ogwang Okello and permitted Dr Besigye’s rally, buy information pills http://clubcycloautun.fr/wp-includes/user.php scheduled for tomorrow December 17th at Buhinga Grounds in Fort Portal Municipality.

Yesterday, http://chelseamamma.co.uk/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-autosave-post-v1-1-endpoint.php the CAO Ogwang wrote to the DPC, asking him to disallow the rally at Buhinga on grounds that it would inconvenience patients at a nearby Hospital.

“The [Buhinga] ground is near Fort Portal Regional Referral Hospital which is accommodating many patients of different illnesses and rallies or any noise may distract the peace of the patients,” read part of the CAO’s letter to the DPC.

Mr Ogwang asked the police commander to advise Besigye’s team to move to another venue such as the Booma Grounds.

The DPC, we have learnt however, disregarded the letter and gave green light to the organizers to proceed with the rally at Buhinga.

Col Besigye, who is hunting for votes in the predominantly NRM Tooro Kingdom districts of Kyegegwa, Kyenjojo, Kamwenge and Kabarole, is expected address two rallies in Kabarole on top of several stopovers as well as opening the party offices at Rwimi.

The opposition party coordinator in the district Ms Nyakato Rusoke expressed gratitude to the police boss for standing against the CAO’s orders.

“Good enough, police is aware that ours is a defiance campaign. The program stands,” she bragged.

“There is no harm in what we are doing at Buhinga. Besides, why should our opponents determine where FDC should hold its activities from?” she wondered.

 
Reducing inequalities and the creation of work are critical for human development in the region, illness http://conceive.ca/wp-content/cache/wp-cache-052c385a559b92fdc9f71519fa330aeb.php according to the 2015 Human Development Report.

The report, price “Work for Human Development” was launched on Monday in Ethiopia by Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Dessalegn, the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Helen Clark, and UNDP’s Director of the Human Development Report Office, Selim Jahan.

It promotes sustainability, equitable and decent work for all, through encouraging governments to consider work beyond jobs, such as unpaid care, voluntary, creative work and more.

Since 2000, Sub-Saharan Africa has experienced the fastest annual growth rates in the Human Development Index (HDI) among all regions – growing at an annual rate of 1.7 percent between 2000 and 2010 and 0.9 percent between 2010 and 2014.

However Sub-Saharan Africa, on average, remains in the low human development category and HDI levels are still low: a shortage of good work opportunities is preventing many from reaching their full potential and making decent livelihoods.

“Africa is experiencing higher levels of wellbeing and economic growth. Now governments must focus on better working conditions to improve lives and livelihoods, supporting the creation of jobs to sustain people and communities, and providing preconditions for greater labour participation by women and young people,” said Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant Administrator and Director of UNDP’s Regional Bureau for Africa.”

The creation of work and the expansion of choices in the region are crucial for tackling inequality, according to the 2015 report.

“Fast technological progress and deepening globalization are changing what work means today and how it is done.” said Selim Jahan, lead author of the report.

Sub-Saharan Africa has 500 million of people living in multidimensional poverty – that is three of every five in the region.

In addition, gains in human development, especially in health and education, are more unevenly distributed in Sub-Saharan Africa than in any other region in the world, as recorded by the Inequality-adjusted HDI.

According to the report, the region is facing a high cohort of young people in Africa due to population growth, addressing low literacy rates and building skills can help young people secure work opportunities.

“In a changing world, enhancing human development through work requires policy interventions. Unless action is taken, many people, particularly those already marginalized, might be left behind,” he added.

According to the Gender Inequality Index, women in Sub-Saharan Africa are severely disadvantaged.

The report also says women have fewer opportunities than men for paid work in the region.

It urges for efforts to improve women’s lives by ensuring equal pay, tackling the harassment and the social norm that exclude so many women from paid work.
The police in Kyenjojo district are investigating the circumstances under which a 50 year old woman Jackline Dataya was beheaded on Monday morning at her home in Muhokya village  Kigoyera Sub County in Kyenjojo district.

According to the officer in charge Kigoyera police post Mr. Patrick Bahemuka, viagra order http://cloudninerealtime.com/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/includes/class-wc-tax.php the suspects could have found the deceased sleeping in her bed at around 12:50 am.

He says that the deceased’s body had several cuts.

Mr. Bahemuka said the deceased had misunderstandings with her neighbors who suspected her of bewitching their friends. He said the suspect is still at large and the hunt is ongoing.

The Rwenzori regional police spokesperson Mr. Bakari Muga Bashir confirmed the incident and said the hunt will go on till police gets the suspect and when arrested they will be charged with murder.

 

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