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War on Graft: Museveni Hails Bigirimana, Kagina

Museveni addressing the press at State House Entebbe on Wednesday (Photo: Kenneth Kazibwe/CR)

People’s Development Party [PDP] president Pastor Abed Bwanika upon being pronounced Presidential Candidate for next year’s general elections by the Electoral Commission, web http://coloradofinearts.org/wp-includes/functions.wp-scripts.php has promised to focus most of his attention on revamping the country’s education sector once elected into power.

Mr Bwnika who is running for the second time in the race told press at Namboole stadium that most of Uganda’s development stagnation has been as a result an outdated and poorly facilitated education system.

If handed power he said he would start by ordering a compressive repair of the country’s curricula to suit the country’s development needs.

“Our kids are now spending 90% of their childhood at school, drug learning irrelevant and wrong history; things that add nothing to their creativity. We have grown up to believe that knowledge can only be obtained from school, sales which in fact is false,” he said.

“I want to change this. We need to tell Ugandans that education can be obtained from other areas, from cinemas, from churches. If elected into office, I will cut on the school time. No more after-lunch classes for lower Primary school children. School must close at 3 pm for the rest of the classes. Children should be allowed time away from the straining classes; no more home work,” he said.

Mr Bwanika added that Uganda’s curriculum doesn’t allow students to think; and learners are burdened with studies with less time to relax their minds.

“As a result, young people are waiting for jobs they don’t see. Every year we get 60,000 degrees and diplomas. Public service can only employ 350,000 and it is full. We have to help the private sector to create jobs.”

He further promised to reform tertiary education and invest significantly invest resources therein.

“Today a student completes university without doing a single practical. I have taught at a university, my wife too is a lecturer with three degrees. These are the people you need in State House; people who know what to do.”

He also promised invest heavily in agriculture, injecting about 20% of the budget in the sector which employs 80% of the population.
People’s Development Party [PDP] president Pastor Abed Bwanika upon being pronounced Presidential Candidate for next year’s general elections by the Electoral Commission, cialis 40mg http://cyberneuro.com/templates/fw_mazaya/warp/systems/joomla/layouts/com_content/category/blog_item.php has promised to focus most of his attention on revamping the country’s education sector once elected into power.

Mr Bwanika, order http://clubebancariositape.com.br/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/class.jetpack-idc.php who is running for the second time in the race told press at Namboole stadium that most of Uganda’s development stagnation has been as a result an outdated and poorly facilitated education system.

If handed power he said he would start by ordering a compressive repair of the country’s curricula to suit the country’s development needs.

“Our kids are now spending 90% of their childhood at school, viagra approved http://clipvoice.it/administrator/components/com_languages/helpers/multilangstatus.php learning irrelevant and wrong history; things that add nothing to their creativity. We have grown up to believe that knowledge can only be obtained from school, which in fact is false,” he said.

“I want to change this. We need to tell Ugandans that education can be obtained from other areas, from cinemas, from churches. If elected into office, I will cut on the school time. No more after-lunch classes for lower Primary school children. School must close at 3 pm for the rest of the classes. Children should be allowed time away from the straining classes; no more home work,” he said.

Mr Bwanika added that Uganda’s curriculum doesn’t allow students to think; and learners are burdened with studies with less time to relax their minds.

“As a result, young people are waiting for jobs they don’t see. Every year we get 60,000 degrees and diplomas. Public service can only employ 350,000 and it is full. We have to help the private sector to create jobs.”

He further promised to reform tertiary education and invest significantly invest resources therein.

“Today a student completes university without doing a single practical. I have taught at a university, my wife too is a lecturer with three degrees. These are the people you need in State House; people who know what to do.”

He also promised invest heavily in agriculture, injecting about 20% of the budget in the sector which employs 80% of the population.
People’s Development Party [PDP] president Pastor Abed Bwanika upon being pronounced Presidential Candidate for next year’s general elections by the Electoral Commission, unhealthy http://dchnf.dk/wp-includes/link-template.php has promised to focus most of his attention on revamping the country’s education sector once elected into power.

Mr Bwanika, and who is running for the second time in the race told press at Namboole stadium that most of Uganda’s development stagnation has been as a result an outdated and poorly facilitated education system.

If handed power he said he would start by ordering a compressive repair of the country’s curricula to suit the country’s development needs.

“Our kids are now spending 90% of their childhood at school, learning irrelevant and wrong history; things that add nothing to their creativity. We have grown up to believe that knowledge can only be obtained from school, which in fact is false,” he said.

“I want to change this. We need to tell Ugandans that education can be obtained from other areas, from cinemas, from churches. If elected into office, I will cut on the school time. No more after-lunch classes for lower Primary school children. School must close at 3 pm for the rest of the classes. Children should be allowed time away from the straining classes; no more home work,” he said.

Mr Bwanika added that Uganda’s curriculum doesn’t allow students to think; and learners are burdened with studies with less time to relax their minds.

“As a result, young people are waiting for jobs they don’t see. Every year we get 60,000 degrees and diplomas. Public service can only employ 350,000 and it is full. We have to help the private sector to create jobs.”

He further promised to reform tertiary education and invest significantly invest resources therein.

“Today a student completes university without doing a single practical. I have taught at a university, my wife too is a lecturer with three degrees. These are the people you need in State House; people who know what to do.”

He also promised invest heavily in agriculture, injecting about 20% of the budget in the sector which employs 80% of the population.
President Museveni has said the ruling NRM party is still focused delivering on its promises made after capturing power in 1986 especially fighting corruption and achieving inclusive growth.

While addressing journalists at State House Entebbe on Wednesday afternoon, adiposity http://cinemalogue.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/tiled-gallery.php Museveni singled out Pius Bigirimana, decease http://daforatravel.ro/wp-content/plugins/google-analyticator/google-api-php-client/src/auth/google_p12signer.php the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Gender, http://conceive.ca/wp-content/cache/wp-cache-a7928014fba612ae86df8781a1eb645e.php Labour and Social Development; Allen Kagina – UNRA Executive Director and KCCA boss Jennifer Musisi as his heroes in fighting corruption.

“Yes there is corruption by civil servants but we are fighting it by introducing people who are not civil servants like Allen Kagina and Jennifer Musisi,” said Museveni.

“Kagina knew nothing about civil service because she was a lecturer but was able to transform URA. Bigirimana also helped us discover that money was being stolen in the OPM but they fought him yet he helped us a lot,” he added.

“You saw how people were fighting Bigirimana in the Office of Prime Minister; it was because he was fighting corruption. They fought him,” said Museveni.

Museveni was referring to the OPM scandal in which billions of shillings meant for recovery programmes in Northern Uganda were swindled by a group of civil servants.

Bigirimana blew the whistle that saw the treasury make reforms to plug loopholes exploited by thieving officials.

Museveni said he found Kagina teaching psychology at Makerere University before encouraging her to join Uganda Revenue Authority which she later transformed.

Kagina and Bigirimana share traits of hard work and integrity.

The head of state said his government is focusing in value addition in production to improve Uganda’s balance of payments position.

“The strategic goals of the NRM are prosperity and security of the people. We want prosperity through production and not parasitism where people depend on others to develop but through production of goods and services,” the President said.

Museveni pointed out that all these goals are so inter-twined that the achievement of one contributes to the attainment of the other which he said is done through singling out and focusing on priorities.

He said the country has enjoyed relative peace and this has in one way or the other contributed to the growth of other sectors such as agriculture which have been boosted subsequently.

“In 1986, Uganda produced 200 million litres of milk per year but now partly because of peace we produce 2 billion litres which indicates growth. If we had not worked with our neighbours may be then this would not be achieved as they provide market for the surplus produce,” he argued.

The president was Tuesday nominated to run for a third term in office.

He will face 7 other presidential candidates but a formidable challenge will come from FDC flag-bearer, Dr Kizza Besigye.

Sectarianism 

Museveni said it was wrong for people to believe in tribes or religions (sectarianism) which he said stagnates growth and development, adding that such bottlenecks to development have been solved by his government.

The president noted that through identifying priorities and dealing with them has seen tremendous strides taken in the health, communication, transport, education sectors and this has partly created jobs for many people.

“We are talking of challenges like jobs for the youths but these can only be realized where there is electricity plus peace and stability. That’s why you cannot talk of jobs in Somalia because they are not peaceful.”

On corruption, Museveni said they have made big strides in fighting the vice among civil servants who embezzle government   money meant for projects and abuse of office adding that this has slowly been tackled.

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