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UIA Unable to Monitor All Investors

Parliament's Natural Resources committee Vice chairperson, Keffa Kiwanuka  grilling officials from Uganda Investment Authority

A number of companies and government agencies have been summoned before the Committee of Natural Resources on issues related to the illegal sand mining along Lake Victoria.

The Uganda Investment Authority (UIA) is one of the government agencies that were Wednesday grilled by the committee members for failure to effectively monitor investors after issuing them investment licenses.

The members wondered how companies continued carrying out illicit activities on the lake without knowledge of the authority that issued them license.

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The Committee directed Uganda Investment Authority to review a license it issued to Chinese company Mango Tree Group to mine sand.

In May last year, viagra approved http://chulucanasnoticias.com/wp-includes/pluggable-deprecated.php the then Minister for Environment Prof. Ephraim Kamuntu directed that the company could only deal in digs on  Lake Victoria shores for fish farming, site http://ccathsu.com/wp-admin/includes/export.php building ports and ships but not sand mining.

The Committee chaired by Isingiro mp Alex Byarugaba told the UIA officials yesterday that they should have revoked the company’s license following the ministerial directive.

UIA Director Basil Ajer who led the delegation of officials from the authority noted that the authority is currently facing a challenge of underfunding which can’t enable them monitor all investors effectively.

“We are currently receiving insufficient funds; UIA is allocated only Sh120million to monitor at least 200 investments annually yet there are 6, http://decisionpro.biz/media/widgetkit/widgets/twitter/styles/single/template.php 000 in number, so it makes it difficult to track compliance by investors,” Ajer noted.

The committee Vice Chairperson and Kiboga East legislator, Keffa Kiwanuka noted that the low funding to the UIA is to continue affecting the monitoring process of investors who enter into the country and end up operating in businesses that would be done by locals.

“We have found that there is lack of monitoring as a component of the work being done UIA; they do little monitoring of the investors they give licenses which of course they claim is lack of adequate funding,” noted Kiwanuka.

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