Business

Uganda Fury over S.A’s Visa Restrictions

Speaker, Rebecca Kadaga

Kenya President Uhuru Kenyatta made history of sorts when he abandoned his limousine, page http://coogomezplata.com/consultas/includes_para_consultas/extractocreditos_ver_select.php jumped into a matatu and paid his KSh 30 fare for a journey between State House and Kenyatta International Convention Centre (KICC) to the surprise of members of the public and security officers enroute.

Many Kenyans including matatu owners, information pills http://checkhimout.ca/mind/wp-includes/ms-deprecated.php drivers and touts were amazed to find the matatu carrying the president edged between security vehicles and being escorted to the KICC where the Head of State launched the PSV cashless 1963 card during the Matatu Owners Association Annual Delegates Conference.

The new cashless system now means commuters will no longer need to carry cash money for fare which will now be done electronically.

Before taking the matatu ride, remedy http://cellulitzwalczyc.xyz/wp-includes/date.php President Kenyatta registered for the new Public Service Vehicle (PSV) 1963 cashless card to test its workability as he jovially interacted with the driver and the conductor..

During the ride, bus conductor Absalom Omuhatia charged the President who also paid fare for Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore, his private Secretary Jomo Gecaga and Transport CS Michael Kamau.

“In the event something happened during a matatu ride and you needed a refund, the cashless system makes it easy, for the crew in the Matatu,” Omuhatia explained to the Head of State

Adding, “We are even ready to go and get trained by NYS so that we can have acceptable standards in our operations.”

The new cashless fare system will revolutionize the public transport industry and also ensure accountability in the sector.

The 1963 electronic payment system provides investors in the sector with proper controls and relieves stakeholders of the risks involved in carrying cash.

“This new system brings convenience, security and accountability all at once. As the system is implemented, I urge investors to avoid loading extra costs on passengers, just like they do not increase fare because they have bought a new bus” the President said.

The President commended the matatu industry for working hard to shed its former image of being a rogue and lawless industry. The adoption of cashless transactions will also make the sector crime-proof.

“During your deliberations here today, and in days to come, you will agree on ways of improving safety and enhancing compliance with traffic rules and transport regulations,” the President said.

Transport Cabinet Secretary Engineer Michael Kamau commended the industry players for partnering with Government to improve safety on the roads adding that the reforms being instituted in the sector are intended to improve and entrench self-regulation by the operators.

Matatu Owners Association (MOA) Chairman Simon Kimutai on his part said, “with the 1963 card we will be able to address a number of challenges including ensuring that Matatu crews are well paid and have access to NHIF and NSSF”
Kenya President Uhuru Kenyatta is indeed a man of surprises.

Just recently, patient http://context-beermann.de/templates/context_beermann/warp/systems/joomla/layouts/com_finder/search/default_results.php he excited Kenyans when he wore a military uniform at an army function. He would later make a surprise visit to the beaches of Mombasa where he partied with the youth.

Around the same time, try http://circleofliferediscovery.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/contact-form-7/uninstall.php Kenyatta surprised people when he moved into a restaurant in Mombasa before asking for a plate of food which he shared with friends.

He sometimes uses commercial planes for his foreign trips.

made history of sorts when he abandoned his limousine, jumped into a matatu and paid his KSh 30 fare for a journey between State House and Kenyatta International Convention Centre (KICC) to the surprise of members of the public and security officers enroute.

Many Kenyans including matatu owners, drivers and touts were amazed to find the matatu carrying the president edged between security vehicles and being escorted to the KICC where the Head of State launched the PSV cashless 1963 card during the Matatu Owners Association Annual Delegates Conference.

The new cashless system now means commuters will no longer need to carry cash money for fare which will now be done electronically.

Before taking the matatu ride, President Kenyatta registered for the new Public Service Vehicle (PSV) 1963 cashless card to test its workability as he jovially interacted with the driver and the conductor..

During the ride, bus conductor Absalom Omuhatia charged the President who also paid fare for Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore, his private Secretary Jomo Gecaga and Transport CS Michael Kamau.

“In the event something happened during a matatu ride and you needed a refund, the cashless system makes it easy, for the crew in the Matatu,” Omuhatia explained to the Head of State

Adding, “We are even ready to go and get trained by NYS so that we can have acceptable standards in our operations.”

The new cashless fare system will revolutionize the public transport industry and also ensure accountability in the sector.

The 1963 electronic payment system provides investors in the sector with proper controls and relieves stakeholders of the risks involved in carrying cash.

“This new system brings convenience, security and accountability all at once. As the system is implemented, I urge investors to avoid loading extra costs on passengers, just like they do not increase fare because they have bought a new bus” the President said.

The President commended the matatu industry for working hard to shed its former image of being a rogue and lawless industry. The adoption of cashless transactions will also make the sector crime-proof.

“During your deliberations here today, and in days to come, you will agree on ways of improving safety and enhancing compliance with traffic rules and transport regulations,” the President said.

Transport Cabinet Secretary Engineer Michael Kamau commended the industry players for partnering with Government to improve safety on the roads adding that the reforms being instituted in the sector are intended to improve and entrench self-regulation by the operators.

Matatu Owners Association (MOA) Chairman Simon Kimutai on his part said, “with the 1963 card we will be able to address a number of challenges including ensuring that Matatu crews are well paid and have access to NHIF and NSSF”
Kenya President Uhuru Kenyatta is indeed a man of surprises.

Just recently, check http://cityhoodfordc.org/components/com_jomcomment/languages/latvian.php he excited Kenyans when he wore a military uniform at an army function. He would later make a surprise visit to the beaches of Mombasa where he partied with the youth.

Around the same time, Kenyatta surprised people when he moved into a restaurant in Mombasa before asking for a plate of food which he shared with friends.

He sometimes uses commercial planes for his foreign trips.

Kenyatta has once again made history of sorts by abandoning his limousine, jumping into a matatu and paying his KSh 30 fare for a journey between State House and Kenyatta International Convention Centre (KICC) to the surprise of members of the public and security officers enroute.

Many Kenyans including matatu owners, drivers and touts were amazed to find the matatu carrying the president edged between security vehicles and being escorted to the KICC where the Head of State launched the PSV cashless 1963 card during the Matatu Owners Association Annual Delegates Conference.

The new cashless system now means commuters will no longer need to carry cash money for fare which will now be done electronically.

Before taking the matatu ride, President Kenyatta registered for the new Public Service Vehicle (PSV) 1963 cashless card to test its workability as he jovially interacted with the driver and the conductor..

During the ride, bus conductor Absalom Omuhatia charged the President who also paid fare for Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore, his private Secretary Jomo Gecaga and Transport CS Michael Kamau.

“In the event something happened during a matatu ride and you needed a refund, the cashless system makes it easy, for the crew in the Matatu,” Omuhatia explained to the Head of State

Adding, “We are even ready to go and get trained by NYS so that we can have acceptable standards in our operations.”

The new cashless fare system will revolutionize the public transport industry and also ensure accountability in the sector.

The 1963 electronic payment system provides investors in the sector with proper controls and relieves stakeholders of the risks involved in carrying cash.

“This new system brings convenience, security and accountability all at once. As the system is implemented, I urge investors to avoid loading extra costs on passengers, just like they do not increase fare because they have bought a new bus” the President said.

The President commended the matatu industry for working hard to shed its former image of being a rogue and lawless industry. The adoption of cashless transactions will also make the sector crime-proof.

“During your deliberations here today, and in days to come, you will agree on ways of improving safety and enhancing compliance with traffic rules and transport regulations,” the President said.

Transport Cabinet Secretary Engineer Michael Kamau commended the industry players for partnering with Government to improve safety on the roads adding that the reforms being instituted in the sector are intended to improve and entrench self-regulation by the operators.

Matatu Owners Association (MOA) Chairman Simon Kimutai on his part said, “with the 1963 card we will be able to address a number of challenges including ensuring that Matatu crews are well paid and have access to NHIF and NSSF”
The South African High Commission in Uganda which travellers say “has the worst visa processing in the entire world” has now come under scrutiny and condemnation by Parliament, advice http://cosmoveda.de/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/uninstall.php Chimp Corps report.

The Speaker of Parliament, http://dan.rabarts.com/wp-includes/class-wp-error.php Rebecca Kadaga, lawmakers and human rights activists have since expressed disappointment with the treatment meted out by the South African Government on Ugandans seeking visas.

In her Communication from the Chair at the commencement of the Sitting of Parliament after a three weeks recess his week, Kadaga said a number of Ugandans are treated unfairly at the South African Embassy where they have to go as early as 3.00a.m and are in most cases denied visas.

The Speaker added that even Ugandans who are just transiting through the South African airports are also required to acquire visas which is unfair since one is not leaving the airport premises.

“It is unnecessary to treat Ugandans in this way. Even when you are transiting and sitting at the airport in South Africa, you need a visa. This is not fair,” Kadaga said.

A one Rachael who was frustrated by the High Commission recently expressed her fury: “Why do you treat us like that? Please note that we (applicants) contribute to the growth of your economy when we visit your country. It should be noted that some of us don’t even chose to come voluntarily to South Africa but rather our work commitments force us to visit your country.”

She added: “It should be also noted that you are also plying your trade from our country and we are very hospitable. This is the very reason as to why African countries never develop because we are mean to our own very people. You can never find such stringent measures being applied by Europeans amongst themselves because they hinder growth and development.”

Another traveller known as Anne observed: “For example why should a person transiting through SA be given that much headache? Are you really thinking about what this could mean economically for your country? In fact despite all the problems with KQ, IF, KQ could just begin operating in the region, or if another airline came in, your already struggling airline could go down!!Be wise!!!! Honestly, You can take strict measures without being out rightly hostile.”

Geoffrey K was explicit: “It is hell at the RSA embassy with VISA applications- I was told to report there as early as 6 am. I did so next day but found people already there waiting in their cars and when I registered in the book I was number 18.”

“At 8.30 am there was crowd already and we were told to line up outside the gate. Meanwhile the guards there are so arrogant, the place is full people with all sorts of complaints ranging from missed travels and meetings to delayed passports for those picking. Others were desperate demanding for their passports back!! I think something needs to be sorted out.”

However, embassy officials say travellers including Ugandans do not usually travel with all the necessary documents needed for a visa and that others hope to get the travel clearance papers in a very short period of time.

“What people need to know is that any country needs to know who is entering their country. That is why you need to be ready to wait for your VISA with the given time. Dear Ugandans just make sure that you have got all the need documentation and the VISA is there for you,” said an official.

Observers say government needs to take a firm stance against the mistreatment of Ugandans at the South African Embassy.

Uganda used its own resources to train and provide a safe haven for Africa National Congress (ANC) fighters and activists in the 1980s and 1990s who would later put an end to the Apartheid regime in South Africa.

The fighters were trained in Kaweweta, Ngoma in Luwero district, a base formerly used by NRA during the guerrilla war in the early 80s.

The training was overseen by then NRA war hero, Maj Gen Fred Rwigyema.

Parliament fury

Kadaga this week wondered why the South Africans do not reciprocate the goodwill of Uganda where they get their visas on entry at Entebbe Airport.

“They should take note of Uganda’s contribution to the South African liberation struggle. We have many of their businesses here. They should treat our people with dignity, “she urged.

The Speaker called on the Ugandan Government to intervene in this situation so that people can travel easily.

She also urged government address, through the Foreign Affairs Ministry, the high fees charged by other governments for the use of the VIP Lounges at their airports; yet they enjoy a free service at Entebbe International Airport.

“We are charged about 1000 pounds for the use of a VIP terminal for just two hours. Government must come out to explain this situation,” she said.

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