Technology

UCC Sponsors Wekebere Device Innovator, Tashobya for Mobile World Congress

UCC Executive Director, Eng. Godfrey Mutabaazi hands over a dummy cheque to  Tashobya on Thursday

Uganda Communications Commission (UCC) have on Thursday morning handed over a fully paid air ticket to young innovator, ampoule http://cssassociation.org/system/modules/frontend/pageerror404.php Stephen Tashobya to go and attend a Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, ambulance Spain.

Tashobya a lead innovator of a diagnostic delivery device (Wekebere device) that examines expectant mothers during  gestation period, received the dummy ticket on Thursday at the UCC headquarters in Bugolobi,Kampala.

While handing over the ticket, UCC executive director, Godfrey Mutabazi thanked Tashobya for the innovation and encouraged the youth to emulate him.

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“I want to thank Tashobya for the great initiative that will absolutely help on reducing the high mortality rates in Uganda,” he said.

“As UCC,we shall facilitate him to the Mobile World Congress in Spain to go and showcase his invention but also learn and network with other innovators,” Mutabazi indicated.

“I would like to encourage our young innovators in Uganda to emulate Tashobya and bring forth much more innovations,” he added.

Tashobya, a fresh graduate from Makerere University with a Bachelors of science in Software Engineering together with three other people invented a diagnostic delivery device and Tashobya was named the best young ICT Visionary Award at the ACIA awards last year. It is from here that Uganda Communications Commission offered to help him improve the new device.

UCC offered Tashobya  $1500 as cash prize for winning the award,$ 5000 for equipping the group with more skills and $2500 as seed funding (capital).

How Tashobya came up with the idea.

Tashobya narrates that while at Makerere University in his final year, he developed the idea of making a device that would help to reduce the mortality rates after his friend in Rukungiri District lost an expectant wife.

As part of his final research, the 26 year old Tashobya teamed up with a three other colleagues and came up with a device that monitors the conditions of both the expectant mother and the foetus in the womb.

How the device operates?

According to Tashobya, the device has a belt which the expectant mother ties around the bell.

The handmade device has sensors that then will then check the temperature, growth and and abnormally of the foetus inside the womb and display the progress on the screen that the doctors can be able to read.

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