Education

Top University Brains Battle in International Law Competition at Cavendish

Brian Kiira and Juliana Kisakye were part of the winning LDC team

A team of 4 students from the Law Development Centre will represent Uganda in Washington in April after emerging winners in an international law competition.

The Philip C Jessup International Law Moot Competition for Uganda was held at Cavendish University on Wednesday .

The team from LDC comprising Brian Kiira, viagra http://christchurchcathedral.org.au/wp-admin/includes/file.php Juliana Kisakye Izizinga, http://curarlaimpotencia.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/tiled-gallery.php Ronald Tukarungurwa and Tendo Ann were able to beat their counterparts from Uganda Christian University in the finals.

Speaking to ChimpReports, http://debiontheweb.com/wp-admin/includes/image-edit.php Tendo, the team captain for LDC said tense  competition forced her to prepare well for his team and this finally paid off.

“I learnt that the things we take as being simple might turn out to be the most crucial,” she told this website.

“We were asked about the simple basics of international law though we expected the hard ones. The moot taught me to always think outside the box so as to excel in life.”

The competition organized on the International Criminal Justice standards had a panel of 5 judges picked from experienced International law lawyers from the country.

The panel included Dr. Busingye Kabumba, Samuel Matsiko, Silva Kayondo, Philbert Kansiime and Aggrey Muhakanakye.

The Panel of judges

The Panel of judges

It was organized by the International Law Association targeting students doing International Law at university.

In an interview with ChimpReports, Dr. Olive Sabiiti, the Dean Faculty of Law at Cavendish University said the competition was a rare chance to instill confidence into students who would later turn into International Law lawyers  that many in Uganda don’t have.

“In many international arbitration cases concerning our country, Uganda has not been able to send lawyers to represent us not because we don’t have them but because they lack confidence,” Dr. Sabiiti said.

“With such competitions, we can guarantee a good breed of future International Law lawyers for the country.”

The Cavendish University Dean for the Faculty of Law says the competition was another chance to enable students learn not to always cram but grasp the concepts in International Law.

“The questions to the students teach them to always think outside the box and what was taught to them .This helps a great deal in sharpening their brains.”

She noted that the topics to be argued about during the competition is globally set from Washington which inculcates the culture of research into students.

According to the head of law at Cavendish University, the competition helps not only those who participate but the entire country as many people start appreciating the value of International Laws .

“International Law defines how our country relates with others and is crucial. This competition therefore imparts skills into students who are able to pass it on to other people.”

Dr. Sabiiti however noted that similar competitions like debates ought to be introduced in schools so as to sharpen the brains of students.

The competition drew top International Law brains from Makererere, LDC, Uganda Christian University Cavendish, and Kampala International University.

The winner will represent Uganda in Phillip C Jessup International Law Moot competition in Washington DC in April in which over 60 countries will participate.

Comments

Header advertisement
To Top