E.A Live News

Slaughter of 11 people in Bujumbura Shocks World

Bujumbura, the capital of Burundi, has been rocked by political violence for months. Photo: Phil Moore/IRIN

Presidential candidate Amama Mbabazi’s wife, advice http://creechsgarden.com/components/com_k2/templates/default/category.php Jacqueline Mbabazi is recuperating after several weeks of illness, shop http://ckls.org/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-site-settings-v1-2-endpoint.php Chimp Corps report.

Jacqueline was rushed to a hospital in London last month over an illness that was not disclosed by the family.

According to latest pictures, Jacqueline is seen in a group of close relatives having tea in London.

Header advertisement

They include Hope Ruhindi – Jacqueline’s controversial sister.

Jacqueline surrounded by close relatives in London

Jacqueline surrounded by close relatives in London

However, she is evidently frail.

Family members told ChimpReports on Monday morning that Jacqueline would soon return to Uganda.

Speaking at his first post-nomination rally at Nakivubo Stadium on November 3, Mbabazi confirmed that indeed her wife was ill.

He said he had spent time with her in the hospital but expressed hope she was on the road to recovery.
Kampala Affairs and Presidency Minister Frank Tumwebaze has spoken out on the controversial KCCA Amendment Bill whose tabling in Parliament has touched off a political firestorm, order http://cooperativenet.com/wp-content/plugins/nextgen-gallery/products/photocrati_nextgen/modules/nextgen_admin/adapter.fs_access_page.php saying the proposed amendments are aimed at streamlining governance and operations of the city authority.

“In as much as the Capital City has experienced significant reforms under the administration of Kampala Capital City Authority, there is inadequacy in the aspect of governance, which has, to a great extent, impeded the smooth operations of KCCA,” said Tumwebaze in an elaborate statement on Monday morning.

“The amendments I am proposing, which have been approved by cabinet, are meant to cure such lacunas like on procedure for elections and in many other provisions of the same law,” he added.

The tabling of the law sparked fears of a political attempt to block controversial opposition politician Erias Lukwago form contesting again as Mayor after being removed from the same position by a government-instituted commission on contested grounds of misconduct and incompetence.

The proposed legislation saw the Electoral Commission defer the nomination of the Lord Mayor until guidelines for the same are provided by the Kampala Affairs Minister.

But Tumwebaze expressed shock that, “These colleagues of mine including the former Lord Mayor, Erias Lukwago are now raving and ranting about the Bill as if it pertains to a person in the name of Erias Lukwago.”

He added: “This Bill like I have stated hereinabove deals with matters to do with general governance questions in accordance with the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda. Let us not misrepresent the bill before even telling the public about its contents as was the case with the land amendment bill some years back.”

Below is Tumwebaze’s statement in full:

Clarification on the recently tabled KCCA amendment bill and on the issue of Regulations for the election of The Lord Mayor

I am writing to clarify certain distortions I have been reading since the KCCA amendment bill was tabled on the floor of parliament.

First is the issue of the minister for Kampala not making regulations that will guide the conduct of mayoral elections and second; is the question of why table the amendment bill now?

Regulations for any law are always intended to operationalise its provisions that may not have been written in detail. The regulations come in to give clarity on procedure and practice of how the provisions of a certain law will be implemented.

In this case therefore, I could not make the said regulations when the law they were meant to operationalise had a lot of provisions that were lacking and needed review.

Instead I had to undertake a process of amending the law which many other stakeholders including Parliament were rightly calling for.  Regulations alone cannot cure the effects of bad law. The solution is to amend the law and cure the lacunas and ambiguities sustainably.

Section 82(1) of the KCCA Act which provides for those regulations states;

“The Minister may, by statutory instrument, make regulations for the better carrying into effect of the provisions of this Act.

Notwithstanding the generality of subsection (1), the Minister may make regulations for—

-Prescribing an area within the Capital City to be the central business district;

-Prescribing particulars to be contained in the quarterly summary reports of procurements and disposals made by the Capital City Contracts Committee;

-The election of representative of professional bodies;

-In consultation with the Electoral Commission, regulating the election of Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor;

-The election of representatives of professional bodies;

-On recommendation of the Police Authority, regulating the Metropolitan Police Force;

-The reporting procedure of Contracts Committee;

-The delegation of powers of Contracts Committee;

The Minister shall, as soon as practicable after the publication of a statutory instrument made under this section, cause the instrument to be laid before Parliament.”

Looking at the phrasing of Section 82 (1) above, one can clearly see that even the requirement of making regulations by the minister is not a mandatory one which clearly tells it all, that the law indeed requires review.

The amendments I am proposing therefore, and which have been approved by cabinet, are meant to cure such lacunas like on procedure for elections and in many other provisions of the same law.

Can the electoral commission therefore, in the circumstances conduct the mayoral elections without the said regulations? That is a matter for the Attorney general to advise.

Broadly why are we amending the law?

In 2005, Article 5 of the Constitution was amended to reflect the special status of Kampala as the Capital City of Uganda, which means that Kampala ceased to be a district under the Local Government system, and that the Capital City was therefore to be administered by the Central Government.

That provision is in the constitution and it’s supreme. Any other law made under the same constitutional provision must not contradict it or attempt to undermine the spirit of the constitution framers in as far the administration of Kampala is concerned.

The objective of the aforesaid constitutional amendment was to introduce reforms to the governance of the Capital City in a bid to address the numerous issues that Kampala faced at that time, for example poor transport infrastructure, traffic congestion, uncontrolled developments, flooding, unregulated transport industry, illegal street trading,  corruption, poor service delivery etc…

In order to give effect to the new status of Kampala under Article 5 of the Constitution, Parliament enacted the Kampala Capital City Act, 2010 which came into force on the 1st of March 2011.

The provisions of the Kampala Capital City Act 2010 prescribe, among others, the administration of Kampala by the Central Government, the establishment of the Kampala Capital City Authority (hereinafter referred to as the KCCA) as the governing body of the city, the composition of the Authority, election, removal and powers of the Lord Mayor, Deputy Lord Mayor and members of the Authority.

The amendments I am proposing therefore, and which have been approved by cabinet, are meant to cure such lacunas like on procedure for elections and in many other provisions of the same law.

In as much as the Capital City has experienced significant reforms under the administration of Kampala Capital City Authority, there is inadequacy in the aspect of governance, which has, to a great extent, impeded the smooth operation of KCCA.

Since 25th November 2013, KCCA has run without a Lord Mayor following his removal by the Authority Councillors using the power given to them under Section 12 of the KCCA Act.

The removal has since been a subject of contestation in the courts of law and debate in Parliament, the media and other public fora. While the removal of The Lord Mayor is provided for in the same law, there was no provision for who and how the functions of the removed Lord Mayor will be performed in both his/her absence and that of the deputy Lord Mayor.

The law should never be made to create an absurdity. This is what partly the amendment seeks to cure.

The KCCA (Amendment) Bill, 2015 which is a culmination of two years of preparation intends to strengthen and streamline the governance of the city, by drawing clear lines of distinction between roles of policy makers and administrators.

The apparent fusion of roles has also contributed largely to the governance problem.

The amendments will also enhance the current provisions in the law, providing for the Metropolitan Physical Planning Authority to engender better planning in the Greater Kampala Metropolitan Area; remove the borrowing limit of the KCCA as long as any such borrowing is compliant with the Public Finance Management Act; and to correct the latent errors and ambiguity in composition of the Authority/Council and nomenclature of institutions and offices.

Lukwago

I have been reading online with consternation the behaviour of my colleagues in the Opposition and some sections of the media in the last three days following the tabling of the Bill for the First Reading.

These colleagues of mine including the former Lord Mayor, Erias Lukwago are now raving and ranting about the Bill as if it pertains to a person in the name of Erias Lukwago.

This Bill like I have stated hereinabove deals with matters to do with general governance questions in accordance with the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda.

Let us not misrepresent the bill before even telling the public about its contents as was the case with the land amendment bill some years back.

Assurance made to Parliament by leader of government business

The amendment bill is not just work of one night.  It has been a process. In December 2014, the Right Honourable Prime Minister made an assurance to Parliament of Government’s intention to deal with the governance question in Kampala through amendment of the law.

He was overwhelmingly supported not to mention the one month deadline the speaker gave him to have the amendment bill presented.

This call by Parliament to have the law amendment had been re-echoed by many other legitimate stake holders of Kampala.

It is therefore dishonest on the part of my colleagues in the Opposition to state that this was an after-thought following Erias Lukwago’s decision to stand for the Lord Mayor position in Kampala.

That is false. Whether Lukwago stands or doesn’t, streamlining the governance framework of Kampala capital city remain our noble duty.

The other inaccurate claim, I have heard is that this Bill is about disenfranchisement of the people of Kampala.

I would like to reassure the people of Kampala and Uganda at large, that this is not the case. To disabuse the notion being peddled, I would like to make a couple of comments.

The issue of disenfranchisement is overstretched by the naysayers. The Council presided over by the Lord Mayor or Division Mayor is no different from the Parliament of Uganda.

Currently, the Lord Mayor and Division Mayors perform the role of a Speaker in the Council. They convene and chair council meetings as their main function.

This is different from the set-up of the district council where a separate speaker is elected from the councillors to head council and not the LC5 chairperson.

The LC5 chairperson heads the executive committee. In the case for Kampala, The Lord Mayor has no executive of a government to form and so is the chairperson and head of council.

What then is wrong with having the Lord Mayor elected by the same legislative council he/she chairs just like it is for the national parliament? Can we say that the people of Uganda are disenfranchised because they don’t vote for the speaker of Parliament through adult suffrage?

Mode of election

The rationale behind the proposal of changing the mode of election of the lord mayor and all other division mayors is for purposes of ensuring that the mayor and the deputy remain accountable to the Council that they chair, just like in the case of Speaker and Deputy Speaker of Parliament who are elected by Members of Parliament.

Besides, the law already vests the same Councils with authority to remove a Lord Mayor or Division Mayor. These Councillors are products of an electoral process conducted from the grassroots.

Ugandans do not convene at Parliament to elect a Speaker or Deputy Speaker. Their representatives in form of Members of Parliament elect the Speaker and Deputy Speaker. Where then is the disfranchisement?

Powers

The other distortion to this debate is the claim that the Central Government is targeting Erias Lukwago and wants to strip him of his powers.

The powers vested in a Lord Mayor are not personal and nothing is changing substantially with the proposed amendments.

In fact, if the proposal of having the Lord Mayor elected by the councillors is rejected and instead a separate position of speaker for the council is created in the law as some stakeholders I consulted had suggested, then the real powers of The Lord Mayor will indeed be stripped since he/she will no longer be the one to convene and chair council.

He will only be an ex-official member of council.  We are however not proposing this in the amendments but it’s another feasible option many other stake holders had mooted.

The amendments therefore, cannot be targeting a man called Erias Lukwago.  The law was never made for Him.  Erias Lukwago just like any other person is entitled to aspire to become a Lord Mayor.

However, what any person aspiring to be Lord Mayor needs to be reminded about is that he/she is not the primary administrator of the Capital City. The Central Government does so as per the Constitution.

The Lord Mayor and the council administer it on delegation by the central government.  Central Government policy therefore takes precedence.

That is why the minister responsible for the capital city is given veto powers under Section 79.  This is what Erias Lukwago has never appreciated, but it’s the bitter truth.

By and large, the amendment bill if passed into law, is intended to improve the City and enhance the operations of the Greater Kampala Metropolitan Area from a physical planning perspective and generally bring about integrated planning in the face of rapid urbanization. It is generally for the common good of all Kampala people.

The amendments therefore should be looked at broadly. Focusing them on one political individual is wrong.  The mode of election being proposed is not only for the office of The Lord Mayor. Division Mayors too shall also be affected.

The amendments will further build synergies among the local authorities and Government agencies in physical planning development.

Whereas the Kampala Capital City Act, 2010 provides, in Section 21 for establishment of a Metropolitan Physical Planning Authority (MPPA), the law does not prescribe its character whether as a body corporate or not, and does not provide for its secretariat or financing.

Yet its (MPPA) establishment is very urgently needed for purposes of harmonizing the broad development of Kampala and its neighbours. Without integrated planning in the metropolitan area, Kampala city will slowly develop into a dangerous bubble waiting to burst.

These are some of the fundamental issues the amendments are focusing on as opposed to the claim of targeting one person.

Fortunately, the bill is now before parliament. Whoever has issues with our proposals and/or has better alternatives to offer, can go and table them before the committee for inclusion in the bill.

We however need urgently to rise above political sentiments and start thinking about Kampala as our Capital City with a special status granted by the Constitution. Its image therefore, is our mirror as a nation. It defines who we are.

Some of us have chosen to stand firm in the face of provocation, intimidation and character assassination from those opposed to the various reforms we have been making.

We however get encouraged when we hear some people acknowledging the positive changes.

We shall remain focused to those positive changes and commit to do more. You can’t make a good omelette without breaking some egg shells.

That is why for us in Kampala it has been a struggle but for good causes and it’s been worth fighting.

Frank K. Tumwebaze (MP)?

Minister for the Presidency and

Kampala Capital City
The fifth annual Joint Sector Review (JSR) of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development commenced on Thursday at Speke Resort Munyonyo, salve http://cotro.com/wp-includes/atomlib.php Kampala.

The two- day JSR is aimed at assessing progress in achieving Sector Strategic Objectives, remedy http://central-alarm.com/wp-admin/includes/export.php identify strengths and weakness of policy implementation during the last financial year, health and assessing the extent of the achievement of the undertakings for the JSR 2014.

F.A Kabagambe Kaliisa, the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Energy was the guest honor at the opening session.

The Review brought together members of the Natural Resources Committee of Parliament, the Chairpersons of the Parliamentary Committees of Budget and the National Economy; Sector Development Partners; Resident District Commissioners and Chief Administrative Officers of selected districts where the sector undertakes a number of activities among others.

In his opening speech, the Permanent Secretary recognized the contribution of the Development Partners, Private Sector, Institutions / Agencies affiliated to the Ministry and all stakeholders towards the Energy and Mineral Development Joint Sector Review.

According to Kabagambe, as part of the Budget formulation process for the next year (2016/17), the Joint Sector Review will examine past performance of the Financial Year 2014/15 and the first part of this Financial Year 2015/16 and jointly agree on budget priorities for Financial Year 2016/2017 and priorities in the medium term.

While explaining the objective of the review, Kaliisa said it’s would account to the stakeholders how the ministry has used government resources at their disposal in service delivery.

He further said the review would agree on the Sector Priorities and solicit for support from stakeholders, to enable them achieve the set targets over the medium and long term.

The Joint sector review is also aimed at informing stakeholders about the huge potential of energy and mineral resources in bringing about socio-economic transformation of the country.

‘Since Government of Uganda has identified the Energy and Mineral Development Sector as a key priority sector, we need the support of all stakeholders including Development Partners to achieve the set targets over the medium and long term,” Kabagambe urged.

He advised leaders from districts to clearly appreciate developments in the sector and give required support especially in the area of compensation for the people affected by the developments.

“During this review, the details of those projects will be disseminated and agreement will be made with district leaders on how to carry them forward, i.e. we need to dialogue and build consensus with you on a number of key areas,” the permanent Secretary said.

The participants were also briefed on Governance, Energy Planning, Management and Infrastructure Development, Oil and Gas sub-sector (Upstream, Midstream and Downstream), as well as Mineral sub-sector.

Also present at the Joint sector review was the Prime Minister of Uganda, Rt. Hon. Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda, the Ministers of State –MEMD, Hon. Simon D’Ujanga and Hon. Peter Lokeris and Members of Parliament.
The fifth annual Joint Sector Review (JSR) of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development commenced on Thursday at Speke Resort Munyonyo, sickness http://coffinpump.com/wp-content/plugins/ubermenu/ubermenu.php Kampala.

The two- day JSR is aimed at assessing progress in achieving Sector Strategic Objectives, visit this identify strengths and weakness of policy implementation during the last financial year, buy more about and assessing the extent of the achievement of the undertakings for the JSR 2014.

F.A Kabagambe Kaliisa, the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Energy was the guest honor at the opening session.

The Review brought together members of the Natural Resources Committee of Parliament, the Chairpersons of the Parliamentary Committees of Budget and the National Economy; Sector Development Partners; Resident District Commissioners and Chief Administrative Officers of selected districts where the sector undertakes a number of activities among others.

In his opening speech, the Permanent Secretary recognized the contribution of the Development Partners, Private Sector, Institutions / Agencies affiliated to the Ministry and all stakeholders towards the Energy and Mineral Development Joint Sector Review.

According to Kabagambe, as part of the Budget formulation process for the next year (2016/17), the Joint Sector Review will examine past performance of the Financial Year 2014/15 and the first part of this Financial Year 2015/16 and jointly agree on budget priorities for Financial Year 2016/2017 and priorities in the medium term.

While explaining the objective of the review, Kaliisa said it’s would account to the stakeholders how the ministry has used government resources at their disposal in service delivery.

He further said the review would agree on the Sector Priorities and solicit for support from stakeholders, to enable them achieve the set targets over the medium and long term.

The Joint sector review is also aimed at informing stakeholders about the huge potential of energy and mineral resources in bringing about socio-economic transformation of the country.

‘Since Government of Uganda has identified the Energy and Mineral Development Sector as a key priority sector, we need the support of all stakeholders including Development Partners to achieve the set targets over the medium and long term,” Kabagambe urged.

He advised leaders from districts to clearly appreciate developments in the sector and give required support especially in the area of compensation for the people affected by the developments.

“During this review, the details of those projects will be disseminated and agreement will be made with district leaders on how to carry them forward, i.e. we need to dialogue and build consensus with you on a number of key areas,” the permanent Secretary said.

The participants were also briefed on Governance, Energy Planning, Management and Infrastructure Development, Oil and Gas sub-sector (Upstream, Midstream and Downstream), as well as Mineral sub-sector.

Also present at the Joint sector review was the Prime Minister of Uganda, Rt. Hon. Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda, the Ministers of State –MEMD, Hon. Simon D’Ujanga and Hon. Peter Lokeris and Members of Parliament.
The fifth annual Joint Sector Review (JSR) of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development commenced on Thursday at Speke Resort Munyonyo, viagra sale http://chesapeakecatsanddogs.org/wp-admin/includes/class-theme-upgrader.php Kampala.

The two- day JSR is aimed at assessing progress in achieving Sector Strategic Objectives, this web http://cdaink.com.br/wp-admin/includes/meta-boxes.php identify strengths and weakness of policy implementation during the last financial year, http://ctrdv.fr/components/com_k2/k2.php and assessing the extent of the achievement of the undertakings for the JSR 2014.

F.A Kabagambe Kaliisa, the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Energy was the guest honor at the opening session.

The Review brought together members of the Natural Resources Committee of Parliament, the Chairpersons of the Parliamentary Committees of Budget and the National Economy; Sector Development Partners; Resident District Commissioners and Chief Administrative Officers of selected districts where the sector undertakes a number of activities among others.

In his opening speech, the Permanent Secretary recognized the contribution of the Development Partners, Private Sector, Institutions / Agencies affiliated to the Ministry and all stakeholders towards the Energy and Mineral Development Joint Sector Review.

According to Kabagambe, as part of the Budget formulation process for the next year (2016/17), the Joint Sector Review will examine past performance of the Financial Year 2014/15 and the first part of this Financial Year 2015/16 and jointly agree on budget priorities for Financial Year 2016/2017 and priorities in the medium term.

While explaining the objective of the review, Kaliisa said it’s would account to the stakeholders how the ministry has used government resources at their disposal in service delivery.

He further said the review would agree on the Sector Priorities and solicit for support from stakeholders, to enable them achieve the set targets over the medium and long term.

The Joint sector review is also aimed at informing stakeholders about the huge potential of energy and mineral resources in bringing about socio-economic transformation of the country.

‘Since Government of Uganda has identified the Energy and Mineral Development Sector as a key priority sector, we need the support of all stakeholders including Development Partners to achieve the set targets over the medium and long term,” Kabagambe urged.

He advised leaders from districts to clearly appreciate developments in the sector and give required support especially in the area of compensation for the people affected by the developments.

“During this review, the details of those projects will be disseminated and agreement will be made with district leaders on how to carry them forward, i.e. we need to dialogue and build consensus with you on a number of key areas,” the permanent Secretary said.

The participants were also briefed on Governance, Energy Planning, Management and Infrastructure Development, Oil and Gas sub-sector (Upstream, Midstream and Downstream), as well as Mineral sub-sector.

Also present at the Joint sector review was the Prime Minister of Uganda, Rt. Hon. Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda, the Minister of Energy and Mineral Development, Hon. Irene Muloni, the Ministers of State –MEMD, Hon. Simon D’Ujanga and Hon. Peter Lokeris and Members of Parliament.
The South Sudan President, sale http://clbattery.com/wp-includes/class-wp-rewrite.php Salva Kiir has retracted his earlier move on the unilateral decree increasing the number of States from 10 to 28.

On the 2nd of this month Kiir who prefers using his constitutionally mandated presidential decree in making critical decisions, http://cocomoonthesea.com/wp-includes/comment.php declared 18 new states while appearing on the national SSTV.

The minister of Information and Broadcaster, http://cyberstudio.biz/main/modules/mod_whosonline/tmpl/default.php Michael Makuei who accompanied the president, told the country that the matter was not going to be taken to the National Assembly and was expected to be effective in a period of a month.

The decree attracted a lot of condemnations from the opposition, civil society organizations and the international community.

The SPLAM In Opposition movement of Dr. Riek Machar said the move violated the country`s Constitution since the powers to change demarcation of states lie in Parliament and the state assemblies.

Article 160 of the Transitional Constitution of South Sudan indicates that the alteration of demarcations can be proposed by the Council of Ministers which is chaired by the president but only decided by the National Assembly and the respective state assemblies.

The council of ministers of sat on Tuesday and reversed the express decision of not taking the matter to Parliament.

The Council chaired by president Kiir decided that the decree be taken to the National Assembly by the Attorney General and seek the legislative approval.

Minister Makuei told reporters in Juba on Wednesday that they (council of ministers) unanimously agreed that the matter be exhausted by Parliament.

“After deliberating on the 28 states for hours we thought it wise to get the views of our Members of Parliament too and the issue is going to be decided in Parliament any time.” Makuei said.

The 28 states declared by president Kiir are; Imatong, Nyamonong, Maridi, Amadi, Gbudwe, Juba, Terekeka, Yei River, Greater Bhar el Ghazal, Wau, Aweil, Lol, Aweil East, Twic , Gogrial East, Tonj, Eastern Lake, Western Lake, Greater Upper Nile, Northern Liech, Southern Liech, Ruweng, Eastern Nile, Jonglei, Western Nile,WesternBieh, Eastern Bieh, Latjor and Boma.
The South Sudan President, viagra buy http://chopcult.com/spiritofrebellion/templates/images/secure.php Salva Kiir has retracted his earlier move on the unilateral decree increasing the number of States from 10 to 28.

On the 2nd of this month Kiir who prefers using his constitutionally mandated presidential decree in making critical decisions, treat declared 18 new states while appearing on the national SSTV.

The minister of Information and Broadcaster, viagra 60mg http://comotenerunabuenaereccion.com/wp-content/plugins/seo-magico-pro/linkedin/linkedin_config.php Michael Makuei who accompanied the president, told the country that the matter was not going to be taken to the National Assembly and was expected to be effective in a period of a month.

The decree attracted a lot of condemnations from the opposition, civil society organizations and the international community.

The SPLAM In Opposition movement of Dr. Riek Machar said the move violated the country`s Constitution since the powers to change demarcation of states lie in Parliament and the state assemblies.

Article 160 of the Transitional Constitution of South Sudan indicates that the alteration of demarcations can be proposed by the Council of Ministers which is chaired by the president but only decided by the National Assembly and the respective state assemblies.

The council of ministers of sat on Tuesday and reversed the express decision of not taking the matter to Parliament.

The Council chaired by president Kiir decided that the decree be taken to the National Assembly by the Attorney General and seek the legislative approval.

Minister Makuei told reporters in Juba on Wednesday that they (council of ministers) unanimously agreed that the matter be exhausted by Parliament.

“After deliberating on the 28 states for hours we thought it wise to get the views of our Members of Parliament too and the issue is going to be decided in Parliament any time.” Makuei said.

The 28 states declared by president Kiir are; Imatong, Nyamonong, Maridi, Amadi, Gbudwe, Juba, Terekeka, Yei River, Greater Bhar el Ghazal, Wau, Aweil, Lol, Aweil East, Twic , Gogrial East, Tonj, Eastern Lake, Western Lake, Greater Upper Nile, Northern Liech, Southern Liech, Ruweng, Eastern Nile, Jonglei, Western Nile,WesternBieh, Eastern Bieh, Latjor and Boma.
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has condemned the recent killing of nine civilians and two police officers in Burundi’s capital Bujumbura, diagnosis http://contesta.fusolab.net/db_mysql.php amid exchanges of heavy gunfire in several neighbourhoods of the city.

A statement issued by Mr. Ban’s spokesperson on Thursday night indicated that the civilians, this web including a staff member of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) named Evariste Mbonihankuye, viagra were reportedly shot at close range.

The incident which took place Tuesday was the latest in a series of increased assassinations in the volatile country.

The Secretary-General demanded that Burundian authorities undertake a “rigorous and prompt investigation into the circumstances and motives behind these despicable crimes in order to ensure that their perpetrators are brought to justice.”

According to the United Nations, Burundi is facing its deepest political crisis since the end of the civil war, after President Pierre Nkurunziza’s decision to run for a controversial third term in office.

A broad array of actors warned that his attempt was unconstitutional and contrary to the spirit of the 2000 Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement for Burundi.

Since April 2015, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has registered more than 130 killings and hundreds of cases of arbitrary arrest and detention.

Almost on a daily basis, dead bodies riddled by bullets are found on the streets of Bujumbura.

There have been concerns that Burundi could be facing slow genocide.

Comments

Header advertisement
To Top