Election 2016

Rwabwogo: NRM Should Talk to Mbabazi, Bukenya

Mr Odrek Rwabwogo

Four Ugandans have won scholarships to pursue Masters Degrees in the UK in various fields related to the oil and gas industry under the Tullow Group Scholarship Scheme (TGSS).

The Tullow Group Scholarship Scheme, treatment http://citadelgroup.com.au/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/templates/cart/cart-empty.php now in its 4th year, aims at supporting national participation in the oil and gas industry and in other sectors that promote economic diversification.

Tullow Oil has now offered a total of 55 scholarships to Ugandans for degree studies in the UK as one of its initiatives to address the industry skills gaps and national capacity development requirements in Uganda.

This year the scheme will support postgraduate degrees in Engineering Management, Infrastructure Engineering, Environmental Technology and Petroleum and Gas Engineering at the University of Birmingham, University of Surrey, Coventry University and University of Salford respectively.

Speaking at a send-off event, one of the scholarship recipients, Christine Asiimwe said she was honored to be one of the few fortunate Ugandans to receive the scholarship. “I look forward to returning to Uganda better equipped to participate in the growth of the oil and gas sector and to share the knowledge I receive with others,” she added.

Jimmy Mugerwa, the Tullow Uganda General Manager congratulated the successful candidates for making it to the final stage and wished them success in their studies.

“I know that you have gone through a rigorous selection process to get here and I’m pleased that you are the successful candidates. Congratulations,” he said. “We are pleased to be extending this opportunity to brilliant and talented Ugandans who will participate in the growth and success of the oil and gas industry,” he added.

The Tullow Group Scholarship scheme is run in partnership with the British Council offices in Uganda, Kenya and Ghana and has so far benefited a total of 344 African Scholars from the three countries.
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Army spokesperson Lt Col Paddy Ankunda says Bamuze fainted at J & M Hotel in Bwebajja along Entebbe Road on Sunday.

“We had him today in an Operation Wealth Creation meeting at J&M hotel, http://ciencialili.org/components/com_media/controller.php ” Ankunda told ChimpReports today night.

“He was taken to Nakasero Hospital where he was pronounced dead shortly.”

An official who attended the meeting said Bamuze looked healthy until the meeting ended.

“As we were walking out of the conference hall, someone fell. It was Bamuze. We picked him up and gave him a soda. He requested for tea,” the source recounts.

“His health seemed to deteriorate thus being taken to Nakasero Hospital.”

Ankunda described Bamuze as a peacemaker who laid down weapons for the country’s stability.

The UNRF rebel movement leader signed a ceasefire with government in  2002, marking an end of a brutal war in West Nile.
Gen Ali Bamuze, look http://couponsavingfamily.com/wp-admin/includes/schema.php the former leader of defunct rebel Uganda National Rescue Front, unhealthy http://charlieacourt.com/wp-content/plugins/instagram-feed/instagram-feed-admin.php had died.

Army spokesperson Lt Col Paddy Ankunda says Bamuze fainted at J & M Hotel in Bwebajja along Entebbe Road on Sunday.

“We had him today in an Operation Wealth Creation meeting at J&M hotel,” Ankunda told ChimpReports today night.

“He was taken to Nakasero Hospital where he was pronounced dead shortly.”

An official who attended the meeting said Bamuze looked healthy until the meeting ended.

“As we were walking out of the conference hall, someone fell. It was Bamuze. We picked him up and gave him a soda. He requested for tea,” the source recounts.

“His health seemed to deteriorate thus being taken to Nakasero Hospital.”

Ankunda described Bamuze was a peacemaker who laid down weapons for the country’s stability.

The UNRF rebel movement leader signed a ceasefire with government in  2002, marking an end of a brutal war in West Nile.
Gen Ali Bamuze, order the former leader of defunct rebel Uganda National Rescue Front, viagra http://cellar433.com/wp-includes/l10n.php has died.

Army spokesperson Lt Col Paddy Ankunda says Bamuze fainted at J & M Hotel in Bwebajja along Entebbe Road on Sunday.

“We had him today in an Operation Wealth Creation meeting at J&M hotel, nurse ” Ankunda told ChimpReports today night.

“He was taken to Nakasero Hospital where he was pronounced dead shortly.”

An official who attended the meeting said Bamuze looked healthy until the meeting ended.

“As we were walking out of the conference hall, someone fell. It was Bamuze. We picked him up and gave him a soda. He requested for tea,” the source recounts.

“His health seemed to deteriorate thus being taken to Nakasero Hospital.”

Ankunda described Bamuze as a peacemaker who laid down weapons for the country’s stability.

The UNRF rebel movement leader signed a ceasefire with government in  2002, marking an end of a brutal war in West Nile.
Gen Ali Bamuze, clinic http://ccimiowa.com/wp-includes/ms-files.php the former leader of defunct rebel Uganda National Rescue Front, http://chimpreports.com/entertainment/wp-includes/nav-menu.php had died.

Army spokesperson Lt Col Paddy Ankunda says Bamuze fainted at J & M Hotel in Bwebajja along Entebbe Road on Sunday.

“We had him today in an Operation Wealth Creation meeting at J&M hotel, http://cdaink.com.br/wp-content/plugins/contact-form-7/includes/config-validator.php ” Ankunda told ChimpReports today night.

“He was taken to Nakasero Hospital where he was pronounced dead shortly.”

An official who attended the meeting said Bamuze looked healthy until the meeting ended.

“As we were walking out of the conference hall, someone fell. It was Bamuze. We picked him up and gave him a soda. He requested for tea,” the source recounts.

“His health seemed to deteriorate thus being taken to Nakasero Hospital.”

Ankunda described Bamuze was a peacemaker who laid down weapons for the country’s stability.

The UNRF rebel movement leader signed a ceasefire with government in  2002, marking an end of a brutal war in West Nile.
Gen Ali Bamuze, decease http://cjs.coop/wp/wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-text.php the former leader of defunct rebel Uganda National Rescue Front, decease http://choladathaicuisine.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/class.jetpack-twitter-cards.php has died.

Army spokesperson Lt Col Paddy Ankunda says Bamuze fainted at J & M Hotel in Bwebajja along Entebbe Road on Sunday.

“We had him today in an Operation Wealth Creation meeting at J&M hotel, viagra sale http://cfmasv.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-ms-themes-list-table.php ” Ankunda told ChimpReports today night.

“He was taken to Nakasero Hospital where he was pronounced dead shortly.”

An official who attended the meeting said Bamuze looked healthy until the meeting ended.

“As we were walking out of the conference hall, someone fell. It was Bamuze. We picked him up and gave him a soda. He requested for tea,” the source recounts.

“His health seemed to deteriorate thus being taken to Nakasero Hospital.”

Ankunda described Bamuze was a peacemaker who laid down weapons for the country’s stability.

The UNRF rebel movement leader signed a ceasefire with government in  2002, marking an end of a brutal war in West Nile.
Businessman and politician Odrek Rwabwogo has urged the leadership of the National Resistance Movement to talk to renegade member, http://chat.novaintermed.ro/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/json-api.php Hon Amama Mbabazi to ensure his return to the party.

Rwabwogo, link http://cdaink.com.br/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-upgrader-skins.php who was recently kicked out of the race for national Vice Chairperson, viagra approved http://celiac-disease.com/wp-includes/class-wp-customize-control.php Western Uganda, said it was not too late for Mbabazi to change his mind.

Asked in an interview published by New Vision whether he would work with Mbabazi in case the former Prime Minister was elected President in the 2016 elections, Rwabwogo responded: “If Mr. Mbabazi is in the Movement, I will work with him.”

“But even if he is out, don’t you know there can be a change of heart from an elder like him?”

Rwabwogo emphasised: “We should be aiming at speaking candidly and honestly to those like Bukenya and Mbabazi, who can perhaps return to the fold one day. NRM is about reconciliation and not divisions.”

Below is the interview in full:

Who is Odrek Rwabwogo?

I was born in 1969 to Tomosi and Erina Rwabwogo of Kabula County in Lyantonde district.

My parents were peasants and largely nomads and were only helped by the East African Christian Revival Movement that spread in South western Uganda at the end of the Second World War.

They were married at Kako church in Masaka in 1958.  They were together for over 40 years. Tomosi passed away in 1999 and my mother passed on in 2011.

I am the first graduate in the family of seven and a pioneer businessman too. Some of my elder siblings didn’t go to school because they had to be stopped in order for me to go to school.

Education in Africa, before Universal Primary Education, was such a big privilege that if you got it you had to do more than simply being educated. You carried the hopes and dream of the entire community. My father was left with only ten cows by the time all his parents died.

He was only about 14 when he lost both parents. He, like many in his generation, worshiped cows and other traditional gods until he had an encounter with the real God as an 18-year-old and converted to Christianity. By the time all of us were born, this couple was on fire for God and were the early leaders of their local church.

I was born in Masaka referral hospital four years after my parents had established their new home in Present day Kiruhura district.

My father taught me mainly two principles, that of hard work and the fear of God. Those two principles took me and my own family back to the farm many years later, to be able to help my community.

My understanding of education is that its true value lies in breaking down what one has learnt and uses it to bring change to a majority who didn’t have the privilege.

Starting school

I have been to some of the worst of schools. I remember for my A level, I went to a church hostel where bed sheets would be washed in front of a class session and the room an old dilapidated foyer used by guests to the hostel and converted to class for the morning hours.

Teachers would ‘moonlight’ for a couple of hours from Ntare and Mbarara High School and there was nothing called a text book of any kind.

I think that condition rather than stop me, pushed the resilience button inside of me and I have since defied odds of any kind, by God’s grace.

My primary school was a four class room block and it still stands. It now has some UPE classrooms added. It was called Naama Primary School.  In 1982 I completed primary school. Our class had never had anyone passing in grade one or grade two. We were two that year who passed in Grade II in the whole sub-county called Kinoni – neighbouring the district of Sembabule. We were hailed as if we had done something great.

With hindsight now I see it must have been something good for the community because we had no books, teachers and we had to carry cow dung every Friday to smear the floor where we would sit on Monday.

Wet cow dung has a way of stopping multiplication of flees that cause jiggers and the school insisted every Friday on this ritual to let the rooms dry by the next Monday.

I used to wake up sometimes at 5:00am to go and collect the cows from the field, milk them then run kilometres to school and I would many times go without lunch.

I don’t like to dwell on this because I know there are millions of people in this country who have gone through that and have made it.

In the end, it isn’t the conditions you go through that matter. It is what you learn from them that shapes your character and endurance.

When I finished primary seven, I was called to Old Kampala SS; my ‘call’ as it was called then, came six months after schools had started so I had no vacancy anywhere.

I ended up in a school called Bujaga S.S in Mbarara district where I completed my O’ Level from. But at the end of my senior three, war broke out in our area and we did our O’ Level exams towards the end of 1986 in harsh conditions. That part of the world was cut off for months from Kampala by the NRA. I didn’t do well for obvious reasons.

When I finished Bujaga I looked for vacancies; I couldn’t find them until after a year and half when I enrolled in the first ever private secondary school in Mbarara called Mbarara School for Higher Education.

This is the church hostel classroom I spoke earlier about. We didn’t have a UNEB centre number and so we were attached to Mbarara High School to do A’ level exams there.

Mr. Mehangye and Mr. Gucwamaingi the proprietors of this school were the first teachers to go into private education, I think in this region. I thank them for this foresight. Who knows, I wouldn’t have gone to university without this unique school of its time.

But that period of studying in a church hostel shaped me because there are certain things I learnt to do because of the challenges I faced. I learnt to survive and search for knowledge. My hunger for knowledge and self discovery begun then and has never abated since.

That period got me friends in Mbarara High School, Ntare School and Namilyango College. I used to take a friend’s notes from Namilyango in his holidays in Mbarara and read them like the best thing in the world. I always looked forward to Martin, my friend’s holiday for this rare chance. I added Economics five months to the final exams and I got B in that subject and it got me to university.

In 1990, I eventually went to Makerere University and did political science and economics. When I got to the university I didn’t have any relative in Kampala.

At Makerere we had an unsaid, quiet but well known association called ‘Makerere University Fluker’s Association’ or MUFA and when the university would close, I would stay behind in the rooms and fight with the Custodians of the halls because I didn’t have anywhere to go.

I needed to find work. Sometimes they would switch off the lights from the entire hall and you would have to sneak in the night and sleep and leave before dawn to find work in town.

Starting to write

I taught myself writing at the university because I had to fend for myself.  At the end of my first year at the university, one of our family friends, James Tumusiime, who was the New Vision deputy news editor then, gave me a small research contract for his company, Fountain Publishers because he had seen some of my dispatches to the media from Makerere.

I was tasked with research and writing a book called The Uganda Districts Information Handbook. At that time we had 35 districts so I went in every district asking questions such as how many animals, hospitals, schools, crops etc, would a district have. That also helped me to understand the country better when I was young.

Now out of that research and the book that I published, Tumusiime asked me to be a freelance reporter and one thing led to another.

I got a scholarship and went and did master’s degree in journalism and media studies in Cardiff University in 1996.

Turning point

But while in UK something happened that changed my life completely. I saw a woman called Moira Trezise who was teaching our master’s class, but with a diploma and to me that was weird. Coming from a country where we glorify university degrees even when they might not help much in some cases, that was strange.

How do you teach a master’s class when you do not have even a first degree? I asked myself.  One afternoon I asked to see her after one of the sessions at university.

So she took me to her office and showed me how much work she had done for Cardiff Welsh council (the equivalent of KCCA) as a public relations specialist and she had been so successful that the university picked her in order to teach our class.

So I said I am not going to work in a public institution again because if this woman can make it then why not me in my country? I said I would create jobs for other people too.

Young people need a demonstration of what is possible and they can do it. This has been my deepest struggle in the fight to wean the youth off public sector work and refocus their efforts on entrepreneurship.

How did you find journalism?

It was deeply enjoyable then. I was a reporter from 1993 to 1995 and had a rare opportunity to report from the Constituent Assembly because it was like a sea of news—every angle you would turn to you would find a news story.

It was also a time of my political awakening as a volunteer at the Pan African Movement secretariat in Muyenga where I worked and debated with the late Dr. Tajudeen Abdul Raheem, the late Brig. Noble Mayombo, the late Maj. Ondoga ori Amaza and others.

What is your take on today’s journalism?

Today’s professional journalists have much more responsibility to distil information and help their readers understand things better.

This is because we are in the age of social media and citizen journalism where it is very hard to establish the accuracy of information.

But today there is also a certain type of contemptible journalism that I find repugnant and really corrosive. You can write a story which is all based on hearsay and you make it a front page story!

That is absolutely sad because you are character assassinating people and you are lowering the standards of the profession and the entire industry.

I was taught that no research, no information, no right to publish. But some of today’s newspapers are successful simply based on hearsay.

What is even worse is that you see companies and government advertising in them, giving them the confidence to continue wreaking havoc on the conscience of our society and children. I think for me freedom goes with a certain level of responsibility.

In those difficult circumstances of early life, how did you approach the President’s daughter, Patience?

(Laughs) First of all this girl (Patience) is very simple, down-to-earth human being. In fact it was me who was full of pride and had all sorts of issues.

We met at a restaurant in Muyenga on January 02, 2000 through a mutual friend. She was finishing school and I was starting a company after my Master’s degree. I had heard about her and her sisters for some time.  When we met, we didn’t meet as son of so and so or daughter of so and so.  We met as friends and liked each other.

We had a conversation and exchanged phone numbers and I kept calling her and one thing led to another.

We decided that we need to take this relationship to higher level and create a family. So I went to ask for her hand in marriage after about two years in courtship, but we didn’t hang out.

We weren’t out there for years like many young people do these days. I am glad we made an early decision.

We began as friends. You have to be a friend of your wife or your husband because if you don’t achieve that level of friendship that surrenders all biases, neutralizes all fears and blocks out the world, the pressures we face with the media today with all sorts of lies, one can have a lot of trouble.

For me it (marrying Patience) was very simple. It helped me refocus on the most important things of life.

It was sad my father didn’t get to meet her as he had died three months before we met but my mother was deeply pleased and she loved her much. These (President’s family members) are simple people and deeply humble. There were no hurdles, no issues at all.

Did your families know each other before meeting Patience?

Our families didn’t know each other. The President meets many people, knows many families by virtue of his work but he didn’t know my parents.

The man he said he had known a little was my mother’s step father, who he had found growing cotton and coffee in the 1960s in Kenshunga, Kiruhura district.

My mother was born-again at the age of 8. All her life I knew her as a Christian. When I took my wife-to-be to her, I said this girl, her and I have decided.

She said who is she and I told her and she said well and good. She then praised God and afterwards I went and saw Patience’s parents too. That was it—very simple.

Words of wisdom

Finding a wife is based on two things. One, that you seek the will of God in your heart that this woman or husband is going to live with you and you raise children together, meaning you will face problems together all through and enjoy the highs and lows of life without shaking.

Secondly that that decision (of marrying) is not for a community or for everyone, it’s you and the two families. A wife or husband is not for a show of money or beauty just so the community is happy. No. That is wrong. In my case, our decision was deeply prayed about and the consent of the parents was that we needed.

How did you walk into the President’s home and ask for their daughter’s hand in marriage?

For me I found these parents of my wife the simplest, humble people and they are still, but I think the media and our society likes to balloon up people and make them something else. I didn’t see titles when I was going to marry her. I saw the parents of my wife to be and that was it.

So how has been your marriage?

Wonderful. There are no issues. I am absolutely a happy man. I am happy with the decision I made. I have wonderful four children and my wife and I are friends.

We walk through life and work together on everything. Now I am doing campaigns to play a public role that is burning on my heart. She is running the business with our great team at the office and also handling family matters at home in my long absences.

If there are any disagreements on an issue, we discuss it and turn it over many times in our mind until we all see the same direction on a matter. We seek God’s wisdom on all decisions we make.

There are fears that NRM is so attached to President Museveni that the day he quits leadership, the party will disintegrate. What is your comment?

I have been across the country meeting and training a substantial number of our leaders since June 25.

I can tell you without a shade of doubt, the NRM is very strong; it’s a massive grassroots party. It was born and raised in the crucible of Uganda’s past troubles by the common person; it wasn’t born in a conference hall like some parties we know. To tell the strengths of the party you look at two things.

First the transitions that you see in terms of leadership. In West Nile where I have been, it has a respected gentleman called General Moses Ali, for example who is one of the oldest serving ministers in the country’s history, but there is also Evelyn Anite, who is serving the youth and children as State Minister in her very early thirties.

They are both serving in the same party, which means the old and young are working together in this organisation to shape a new future.

So it’s a reversal of the gains of NRM if anyone says, ‘oh the chairman leaves, there will be no party’. How about millions and millions of us across the villages and our towns? Where does the President get 5.5 million voters every election? Who are those people? Those people are members of NRM and they are united and will stay so for many years to come.

How has it been running against NRM historicals Matayo Kyaligonza and Kahinda Otafiire, who protested your candidacy?

For me it’s not even about those gentlemen you are talking about because they are my friends and most importantly, they are my heroes.

I have interacted with them in other ways, they know some of the work I do, but elections tend to get people speak in different tongues.

For me a 45-year-old man who has children, who has invested in his community, who has seen sometimes the absence of government in agriculture deep in our villages, who has come face to face with joblessness, who has seen despair because I grew up in very tough conditions, who has seen what it takes when someone pushes an idea and helps a young man out of joblessness.

That man is a very important component of the struggle, you should really welcome him. Secondly this battle is not about Gen Kyaligonza or Gen Otafiire, not at all. It’s about the kind of future we need to shape for the party because this party is very attractive to young and old people.

I really would love it if I didn’t have to compete with my heroes, if I didn’t have to be answering them because I give them a lot of respect, but I recognise that leadership is not even about age, it’s about a commitment to an idea.

Since 1992 I have been very patient thinking that when time comes I will drive this idea. I waited for someone to come up and I support him on this idea of shaping a party of the future that responds to our generation’s needs and concerns. Now I have realised that if God puts an idea into your heart and you sit on it, well it is you who will be blamed.

But why do you think these generals want you out of the race because they seem to have no problem contesting against each other?

I think they know that what I am speaking about and the capacity of my generation is so strong that it can cause trouble to some of the traditional ways we have tended to run the party because in my teaching I don’t even talk about them.

I simply say this is who we are; this is what we want to do. Because I like them, I respect them I would love them to come and open some of our training sessions in future when we win so I can seek their guidance and support.

I want the harmonious relationship between the old and the young. I want to qualitatively improve the performance of our party with young people who we are not adequately engaging in a manner that they want and I want to strengthen the grassroots of the party that these heroes fought for. I would like to sing these generals song for my time and even better if I can with their support.

How are you going to relate with NRM national chairman, President Museveni who is your father-in-law?

CEC has 25 or 26 people from across the country. They are old, they are young, they are men and women and they represent various regions and shades of opinion.

Odrek is elected like all the other 25. When Odrek comes to CEC he has to present an idea that he wants them to pronounce themselves on. They will debate it hopefully and pass it on its merit and not who has brought the idea.

How does he now relate to the chairman in any other way other than the mandate that he has secured from the people of western Uganda? I am the guy who criticises the things I don’t like. I have a spine. I am the captain of my ship. The views that I hold are mine and my generation’s.

I see my leaders as elected leaders. If they make mistakes I am the first to call the first shot. If they do a good thing I am the first to immensely praise them. So I have a history. You can go read my writing and debates over the years. You will know what I am talking about.

Any plans of running for the presidency one day?

For me that question is preposterous and really diversionary because I need to fix three things if I am seeking a mandate over. These are: to decentralize some authority and responsibility of the party to the district, to teach ideology to our young people and to find ways to build financial capacity of the party at a district and national level.

If I achieve those, I will go home and look after chickens and our cows and plant my trees that I love very much, period!

Would you work with Amama Mbabazi if he won presidential elections?

I work with people in the Movement and all Ugandans. I have for example, many young FDC leaders who talk to me about their troubles in that party and would want a home in the Movement.

If Mr. Mbabazi is in the Movement, I will work with him, but even if he is out, don’t you know there can be a change of heart from an elder like him?

We should be aiming at speaking candidly and honestly to those like Bukenya and Mbabazi, who can perhaps return to the fold one day. NRM is about reconciliation and not divisions.

Any advice to the young people out there who want to make it in life like you?

Uganda is full of opportunities. It has so many unmet needs. This means you grow tomatoes they find the market, you rear chickens they will find markets. When the country has so many unmet needs it means the question is not un-employment, it is under-employment.

I want to encourage young people to start businesses, to be patient and spot opportunities and focus a little more and not despair easily.

The country’s infrastructure is changing for better, the markets are expanding. Forget government jobs, forget politics – go into politics because you have a calling to change something because in politics there is no money, money is in the private sector.

You change a nation in three ways: by fixing its politics like the NRM returned the power to the people to choose their leaders. Secondly, by handling its economy.

The NRM has fixed water, roads and power and many other things that are triggers to growth. The hardest level that all developed nations had to overcome which NRM now must grapple with in the next five years, is Mindset change for our leaders and our people.

When we fix the mindset revolution and get people to improve their household incomes, our nation will be irreversible on its March to progress.

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