Crime & Investigation

Police Warn of Looming Terror Attack

Police spokesperson, Fred Enanga

Tullow Oil plc (‘Tullow’ or the ‘Group’) has announced that it has settled its Capital Gains Tax (‘CGT’) dispute with the Government of Uganda and the Uganda Revenue Authority (‘URA’) with regard to its farm-downs to CNOOC and Total in 2012.

“Following constructive discussions with the Government of Uganda and the URA, more about http://cienciaaldia.com/wp-includes/wp-db.php Tullow has agreed to pay $250 million in full and final settlement of its CGT liability, what is ed http://cutteraviation.com/wp-includes/class-wp-user-query.php ” the oil company said in a statement on Monday.

“This sum comprises $142 million that Tullow paid in 2012 and $108 million to be paid in three equal instalments of $36 million. The first of these was paid upon settlement and the remainder will be paid in 2016 and 2017.”

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It remains unclear why Uganda government agreed to settle the matter outside court. The move will see Uganda lose about $1m.

Tullow disputed the URA’s assessment of $473 million of CGT payable following the farm-downs and appealed against the assessment before the Uganda Tax Appeals Tribunal (‘TAT’) and commenced an International Arbitration in September 2013.

In July 2014, the TAT rejected Tullow’s appeal and assessed Tullow’s CGT liability for the farm-downs at $407 million less $142 million previously paid.

In its 2014 accounts, Tullow recorded a contingent liability of $265 million in relation to the dispute.

Tullow subsequently appealed the TAT ruling to the Ugandan High Court and continued with its International Arbitration claim.

The organisation said following this settlement, both these legal proceedings have been withdrawn.

Commenting today, Aidan Heavey, Chief Executive said: “The settlement of this long-running dispute is good news for Tullow and Uganda.”

He added: “In recent months, the Government of Uganda has proposed welcome and necessary changes to its tax regime for oil and gas investments which it is hoped will enable substantive progress to be made towards the sanction of the Lake Albert oil development.”
Tullow Oil plc (‘Tullow’ or the ‘Group’) has announced that it has settled its Capital Gains Tax (‘CGT’) dispute with the Government of Uganda and the Uganda Revenue Authority (‘URA’) with regard to its farm-downs to CNOOC and Total in 2012.

“Following constructive discussions with the Government of Uganda and the URA, buy more about Tullow has agreed to pay $250 million in full and final settlement of its CGT liability, cure http://christiansforve.org.au/wp-admin/includes/meta-boxes.php ” the oil company said in a statement on Monday.

“This sum comprises $142 million that Tullow paid in 2012 and $108 million to be paid in three equal instalments of $36 million. The first of these was paid upon settlement and the remainder will be paid in 2016 and 2017.”

It remains unclear why Uganda government agreed to settle the matter outside court.

Tullow disputed the URA’s assessment of $473 million of CGT payable following the farm-downs and appealed against the assessment before the Uganda Tax Appeals Tribunal (‘TAT’) and commenced an International Arbitration in September 2013.

In July 2014, website like this the TAT rejected Tullow’s appeal and assessed Tullow’s CGT liability for the farm-downs at $407 million less $142 million previously paid.

In its 2014 accounts, Tullow recorded a contingent liability of $265 million in relation to the dispute.

Tullow subsequently appealed the TAT ruling to the Ugandan High Court and continued with its International Arbitration claim.

The organisation said following this settlement, both these legal proceedings have been withdrawn.

Commenting today, Aidan Heavey, Chief Executive said: “The settlement of this long-running dispute is good news for Tullow and Uganda.”

He added: “In recent months, the Government of Uganda has proposed welcome and necessary changes to its tax regime for oil and gas investments which it is hoped will enable substantive progress to be made towards the sanction of the Lake Albert oil development.”
Following an attack on the Somalia intelligence centre by suspected Al Shabaab insurgents, story http://couponadventures.com/wp-includes/feed-rss2-comments.php the police spokesperson Fred Enanga has warned that the extremists are planning to attack three other countries, cialis 40mg http://chasingjamesbeard.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/widgets/gravatar-profile.php Uganda inclusive.

Last week a suicide bomber rammed a car packed with explosives into the entrance of a Somali intelligence training center before armed attackers traded heavy gunfire with security guards as they tried to enter the building.

Al Shabaab claimed responsibility of the attack.

“Like we had earlier been tipped off by our intelligence that they (Al Shabaab) planned to hit Kenya, viagra http://cyancdesign.com/wp-admin/maint/repair.php Somalia, Ethiopia and Uganda, it happened in Somalia as the Ramadhan started,” Enanga told journalists on Monday afternoon.

“We suspect that they are planning to do the same here as the holy month continues and we urge the public to be vigilant against any suspected individual.”

According to the police mouthpiece, the insurgents have on several occasions tried to hit the country but have been thwarted by the security agencies, noting that there is need to be beef up security in the holy month as the terrorists would want to use the opportunity to strike.

“We admit being careless in terms of intelligence in 2010 and we were hit. We were not able to detect the terrorists who spent more than two months in the outskirts of the city in Najjanankumbi. We can’t afford to repeat the same mistake that led to loss of many lives,” Enanga later said in an exclusive interview with ChimpReports.

Enanga said that the 2010 incident taught great lessons to the security agencies adding that since then they have since thwarted two attacks, the recent being in September where suicide vests were recovered in Kampala.

“The initiative is not only on security organs but each one of us to always be vigilant and ensure safety precautions unlike in 2010 where there were no measure put in place especially at Kyadondo.”

On the night of July 11, 2010, Al Shabaab struck Kyadondo Rugby Grounds and Ethiopian Village Restaurant in Kabalagala, killing over 70 people who were watching the World Cup finals.

Over 15 people have since been apprehended and prosecuted in courts of law for masterminding the attacks.

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