Politics

Parliament Demands Constitutional Amendments

Cecilia Ogwal says the Executive does not seem to be bothered by the proposed constitutional amendments

Ecobank Group CEO Albert Essien  gave the keynote address in Munich at the 4th Conference on Managing Risk in Africa, look http://citizenspace.us/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-ms-sites-list-table.php offering strategies for managing risk in Africa’s growth markets.

Against the backdrop of what he outlined as a generally positive outlook for Africa, stomach http://copdx.org.au/wp-admin/includes/export.php he advised investors against viewing Africa as one, but rather 54 countries with different growth prospects, different infrastructure, trade agreements, tax regulations, culture and levels of technological development.

Mr Essien urged investors “to be prepared to engage with African countries on a long-term basis and avoid abrupt changes in investment focus because of perceived instability in certain markets.”

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Africa’s growth outlook continues to be robust despite rising headwinds for the continent’s economies.

The continent has emerged as a frontier market driven by high commodity and oil prices, stable macro-economic environments, large investments from the BRIC economies and rising internal consumer spending.

But growth headwinds are now coming to the fore – traditional export markets in Europe remain stagnant, China’s growth is slowing and the oil price is falling – both of which will negatively impact the growth outlook of Africa’s extractive industries-dominated economies.

Security concerns have also risen in the past year.

Essien on Wednesday encouraged managing risks associated with doing business in Africa, including fiscal and monetary policy issues such as foreign exchange restrictions, transparency and compliance, political instability and corruption and resource and infrastructure challenges.

The Ecobank Group CEO offered executives overseeing market entry strategy in Africa six key considerations that they would have to contend with.

These, he said, were: “understanding the local business culture; assessing which markets represent the best balance of risk and reward; finding and vetting appropriate local partners; understanding local market regulations; local environmental factors; and levels of technological development.”

Mr Essien highlighted several market entry risks, which he enumerated as: political risk, reputational risk, operational risk and physical risk to staff and assets

He encouraged scenario planning as a good way to anticipate what future trends might emerge and what their impact and probability might be.

“Whatever risks are identified, they are best viewed holistically rather than in isolation. New market entrants will need to develop a clear risk appetite and weigh the opportunity against the cost of risk mitigation, which can be expensive,” Mr Essien said.
The first peer-review meeting for the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) under the Africa for Results (AfriK4R) initiative kicked off in the Kenyan capital Nairobi this week, viagra order http://ciudad-deporte.com/wp-content/plugins/ml-slider/inc/slide/metaslide.image.class.php ChimpBusiness reports.

The three-day meeting is aimed at evaluating the efforts of eight COMESA member states and associated country Tanzania in improving policy convergence and results-oriented policies and programs in the region, find http://contenthog.com/pr/wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-text.php with a focus on accelerating the implementation of development interventions.

Speaking at the opening on behalf of Kenya’s Devolution and Planning Cabinet Secretary Anne Waiguru, website http://confusedcoconut.com/wp-includes/rss-functions.php Principal Secretary Eng. Peter Mangiti stressed the need for development interventions with a transformative impact.

He also challenged country delegates to plan and implement better in order to “make sure development drivers are impacting people’s lives at least possible cost”.

Kipyego Cheluget, Assistant General Secretary for Programmes at the COMESA Secretariat, made a passionate appeal to member states to show commitment to achieving results and help scale up the benefits of regional integration.

In her presentation on COMESA and its Tripartite Free Trade Agreement (FTA), Anne Ndirangu, Chief of Monitoring and Evaluation at the COMESA Secretariat, emphasized that “regional integration is the way forward for Africa”; echoing the sentiments of Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for East African Affairs Phylis Kandie, who was represented by Integration Secretary Barrack Ndegwa. The Tripartite FTA is slated for launch by mid-2015.

During his speech on behalf of Gabriel Negatu, Director of the Bank’s East Africa Regional Resource Center (EARC), Stefan Muller called on delegates to address the issue of “soft” infrastructure which would help “build strong and accountable institutions and create a performance culture that permeates the management of public affairs and accelerates regional integration”.

Trade facilitation

Victoria Chisala, AfCoP Coordinator and Results Division Manager of Quality and Results at the Bank, reiterated both AfCoP and AfDB’s commitment to supporting regional integration efforts in the COMESA region.

Throughout the meeting, 140 delegates representing government, civil society, private sector, parliament, as well as gender and youth organizations will share insights, best practices and solutions on key regional integration objectives, including the promotion of an attractive business climate; trade facilitation and improved public financial management; and the mainstreaming of a managing for development results (MfDR) culture in the COMESA Secretariat and its member states.

The event is organized under the Africa for Results (AfriK4R) Initiative; the flagship program of the African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results, housed within the Quality and Results Department of the Bank, in collaboration with COMESA and with support from EARC.

AfriK4R aims at building results capacity and accelerating regional integration through MfDR, and the AfriK4R-COMESA Peer Review Meeting represents the first major regional activity since the COMESA-CoP’s establishment in May 2012.

COMESA-CoP is the result of a partnership launched in 2012 between the African Community of Practice for Managing on Development Results (AfCoP-MfDR) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern States (COMESA) and aims at accelerating regional policy implementation through the use of MfDR tools and mainstreaming the use of results-based management principles.

The African Community of Practice (AfCoP) is a coalition of over 3,500 development leaders and practitioners from 68 countries globally. AfCoP members work for African governments, civil society, and as independent experts in the field. The African Development Bank (AfDB), in partnership with the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), is supporting AfCoP in mainstreaming MfDR on the continent with a focus on regional integration.

The Africa for Results (AfriK4R) initiative, AfCoP’s flagship program, aims to promote regional integration in Africa through the use of managing for development results (MfDR) principles and practices.

To date, 17 countries have committed to the AfriK4R initiative, namely Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Côte d’Ivoire, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The WAEMU and COMESA regional economic communities are also partners on the AfriK4R initiative.
The first peer-review meeting for the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) under the Africa for Results (AfriK4R) initiative kicked off in the Kenyan capital Nairobi this week, symptoms ChimpBusiness reports.

The three-day meeting is aimed at evaluating the efforts of eight COMESA member states and associated country Tanzania in improving policy convergence and results-oriented policies and programs in the region, check http://cgt06.fr/wp-admin/includes/widgets.php with a focus on accelerating the implementation of development interventions.

Speaking at the opening on behalf of Kenya’s Devolution and Planning Cabinet Secretary Anne Waiguru, prescription Principal Secretary Eng. Peter Mangiti stressed the need for development interventions with a transformative impact.

He also challenged country delegates to plan and implement better in order to “make sure development drivers are impacting people’s lives at least possible cost”.

Kipyego Cheluget, Assistant General Secretary for Programmes at the COMESA Secretariat, made a passionate appeal to member states to show commitment to achieving results and help scale up the benefits of regional integration.

In her presentation on COMESA and its Tripartite Free Trade Agreement (FTA), Anne Ndirangu, Chief of Monitoring and Evaluation at the COMESA Secretariat, emphasized that “regional integration is the way forward for Africa”; echoing the sentiments of Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for East African Affairs Phylis Kandie, who was represented by Integration Secretary Barrack Ndegwa. The Tripartite FTA is slated for launch by mid-2015.

During his speech on behalf of Gabriel Negatu, Director of the Bank’s East Africa Regional Resource Center (EARC), Stefan Muller called on delegates to address the issue of “soft” infrastructure which would help “build strong and accountable institutions and create a performance culture that permeates the management of public affairs and accelerates regional integration”.

Trade facilitation

Victoria Chisala, AfCoP Coordinator and Results Division Manager of Quality and Results at the Bank, reiterated both AfCoP and AfDB’s commitment to supporting regional integration efforts in the COMESA region.

Throughout the meeting, 140 delegates representing government, civil society, private sector, parliament, as well as gender and youth organizations will share insights, best practices and solutions on key regional integration objectives, including the promotion of an attractive business climate; trade facilitation and improved public financial management; and the mainstreaming of a managing for development results (MfDR) culture in the COMESA Secretariat and its member states.

The event is organized under the Africa for Results (AfriK4R) Initiative; the flagship program of the African Community of Practice on Managing for Development Results, housed within the Quality and Results Department of the Bank, in collaboration with COMESA and with support from EARC.

AfriK4R aims at building results capacity and accelerating regional integration through MfDR, and the AfriK4R-COMESA Peer Review Meeting represents the first major regional activity since the COMESA-CoP’s establishment in May 2012.

COMESA-CoP is the result of a partnership launched in 2012 between the African Community of Practice for Managing on Development Results (AfCoP-MfDR) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern States (COMESA) and aims at accelerating regional policy implementation through the use of MfDR tools and mainstreaming the use of results-based management principles.

The African Community of Practice (AfCoP) is a coalition of over 3,500 development leaders and practitioners from 68 countries globally. AfCoP members work for African governments, civil society, and as independent experts in the field. The African Development Bank (AfDB), in partnership with the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), is supporting AfCoP in mainstreaming MfDR on the continent with a focus on regional integration.

The Africa for Results (AfriK4R) initiative, AfCoP’s flagship program, aims to promote regional integration in Africa through the use of managing for development results (MfDR) principles and practices.

To date, 17 countries have committed to the AfriK4R initiative, namely Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Côte d’Ivoire, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The WAEMU and COMESA regional economic communities are also partners on the AfriK4R initiative.
Members of Parliament have asked the government to lay before the House, troche http://cotro.com/wp-content/plugins/fusion-builder/inc/lib/inc/class-fusion-dynamic-js-compiler.php constitutional amendments that are required before the general elections in 2016.

Opposition say a new Electoral Commission (EC) should be established and a complete overhaul and review of existing technical staff returning and presiding officers be undertaken.

They want the new EC to be selected by a body called the National Consultation comprising of all stakeholders, following a process of open application, public hearings and scrutiny.

The issue was raised by Dokolo Woman Representative, Hon. Cecilia Ogwal during Prime Minister’s Question Time during the Parliamentary sitting on Wednesday.

Hon. Cecilia Ogwal said that Parliament through the Speaker had sought that these amendments are presented to the House since the beginning of this session in vain.

“Madam Speaker, you have asked for these amendments but the Executive does not seem to be bothered. Prime Minister, when are the constitutional amendments coming before the House,” she said.

The Speaker, Rt. Hon. Rebecca Kadaga also weighed in and demanded that the Premier informs the Members about the introduction of these amendments.

“I have been asked you before about when you will present the amendments for First Reading,” the Speaker told the Prime Minister.

The Prime Minister and Leader of Government Business, Rt. Hon. Ruhakana Rugunda said that Cabinet is in the final stages of handling the amendments but noted that the Attorney-General who is spearheading the process was out of the country.

“The Attorney General is leading a team which is in London handling the cases in the oil sector. Since he is the head of the sector on these reforms, it is right and prudent that we wait for his input before we come before the House”, Hon. Ruhakana Rugunda stated.

According to the proposals, a new EC should compile a new, clean and verifiable voters’ register which should include eligible Ugandans in the Diaspora and that this must be done in a transparent and accurate manner, and not based on the ongoing National Identity card project.

The opposition say the voters’ register should be accessible to all as a public document that can be inspected at no cost, adding, the military should have no involvement whatsoever in the electoral process.

The proposed reforms include a provision whereby law and order during elections shall exclusively be the responsibility of the Uganda Police Force under supervision of the EC and that “Police and military should vote in regular polling stations, and must not bear arms or wear uniforms during the process.”

Scapegoat

In a statement to Chimpreports recently, Presidency Minister, Frank Tumwebaze said opposition groups led mainly by Dr Kizza Besigye are using the “electoral reforms” as one of the scapegoats to cover up their “their glaring political weaknesses.”

“They (opposition) are vigorously trading in the so called electoral reforms campaign. Ideally that would mean that they have a set of proposals suggesting either policy or legal reforms. And these would be specific with clear justifications for the different mandated arms of government to look at and consider. Unfortunately these so called reforms are not anywhere articulated,” said Tumwebaze.

“It’s all about one and only one obsession of theirs: Museveni and Museveni nothing else. To them electoral reform means removing Museveni. One wonders whether beyond their anti-Museveni agenda, they have anything else crucial to offer to Uganda’s development trajectory. This eventually renders their whole crusade illogical,” the Minister added.

Tumwebaze said the opposition insists on disbanding the Electoral Commission yet they know the body was created by the Constitution and appointed with the approval of parliament.

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