Politics

NRM Youth League Vows to Fight Mbabazi

In a bid to give back to its customers, more about shop http://copdx.org.au/wp-includes/comment-template.php Heineken on Friday 19th June 2015 rewarded its customers with green sofa sets. The ceremony which took place at Heineken offices in Kampala saw five lucky clients receive inflatable champions league sofa sets from Heineken’s Uganda National sales Manager Nathan Akandwanaho assisted by Steven Baryevuga, information pills the PR Team Leader.

Jackie Nyakato, what is ed Emmanuel Ssewankabo, Patrick Amayo, Patrick King and Isaac Lumu are the five clients that were rewarded from this promotion in which Capital Shoppers Ntinda, Game stores in Lugogo, Nakumatt Oasis mall and shoprite Lugogo were among the participating retail stores.

Isaac Lumu receives a Sofa set from the Heineken National Sales Manager.

Isaac Lumu receives a Sofa set from the Heineken National Sales Manager.

“We are a brand that believes in giving back to our supporting consumers.” Akandwanaho said. “These winners today are a proof of our commitment to continue giving our customers the best enjoyment and quality from our products,” he added

The sofa sets reward promotion started off in March and was concluded with a Heineken sponsored UEFA champions league campaign dubbed “champion the Match” where soccer lover were treated to VIP treat by the brewers on match nights,

According to Akandwanaho, Heineken has other consumer promotions coming up in the next months like the Rugby World Cup of which they are a sponsor.
Dr. Joris Vanderputten, page http://demamore.com/wp-content/plugins/bbpress/templates/default/extras/page-user-register.php a 42-year-old medical expert from Netherlands and Chief Executive Officer of the uptown Kampala Hospital finds no trouble naming Uganda amongst the most flexible and hardworking nations in the world.

ChimpReports’ Michael Ntezza caught up with him at his office in Kololo, http://cirgroup.com/typo3conf/ext/powermail/lib/user_powermail_updateerror.php Kampala for a one-on-one about Uganda’s healthcare, excellent climate and chaotic road users.

Who is Dr. Joris Vanderputten?

Joris is a 42-year-old family man born in Netherlands, a qualified doctor specializing in Tropical medicine, surgery, pediatrics and public Health.

I am a married man with three kids. I have worked in Tanzania in a district hospital. That’s where I started to generate love for Africa, its peoples and culture.

Briefly take us through your childhood

During my childhood days, I liked sporting activities. I had a lot of interest in scientific subjects like maths, physics, biology and chemistry. I think becoming a doctor was the most logical decision. My Dad is a vet, my mother is a physiotherapist and most of my uncles and aunties were also doctors.

How did you join Kampala hospital?

I got in touch with Investors who told me they wanted to set up the hospital in Kamala and that they needed a CEO. I joined Kampala hospital in April 2014 after being chosen as the successful candidate.

I heard of this job from Netherlands as I was looking for consultancy work in Africa. It was a long process; I had to take numerous flights from Netherlands where I was staying with my family to hold interviews in Uganda.

It also took me some time and effort to complete the process of getting a work permit and immigrations documents, but it was all worth it.

Tell us a little bit about Kampala Hospital

The idea of establishing Kampala hospital was conceived in 1995 by a group of medical doctors, other professionals in Uganda and the hospital was opened in 2007.

The intention of establishing this hospital was to bring non-existent services to the country, that were sought by many people who frequently moved abroad to get say complex surgery operations like neurosurgery.

Another reason for establishment of this hospital was to create employment for Ugandan doctors who are experienced but lack employment

How far have you reached in realizing some of these dreams?

To a larger extent we have managed because we have put in place a number of modern machines in our theatres with well-trained surgeons to carry out operations that are really serious.

We have our hospital facilities open to all qualified medical practioners who may have patients in need of surgery but have no equipment and a convenient place to do the surgery.

The hospital is currently employing over seventy doctors and other support staff

What challenges has Kampala Hospital faced in its operations?

We have faced the problem of lack of qualified engineers to service and maintain our machines; to the extent that once a machine breaks down we have to bring in an engineer from outside.

The Hospital used to face a problem of unstable electricity power leading to the use of a generator which is costly.

What makes Kampala Hospital different from other Health facilities in Uganda?

Unlike other health facilities at Kampala Hospital we have got various types of doctors including part-time doctors from top medical facilities like Mulago Referral Hospital to supplement our full-time staff thus ensuring that our patients are well catered for.

One of the rooms on the hospital's private wing

One of the rooms on the hospital’s private wing

We have a number one private wing section, well equipped with all necessities that a patient needs.

We have questionnaires for our patients where we engage them on how to improve our services and we don’t take their advice for granted.

What difference do Ugandan doctors have compared to other doctors on the international market?

Ugandan doctors are very good because most of them are fluent in speaking English as well as eager to learn new things

We understand that Kampala Hospital is re-branding. Tell us more about the thinking behind this.

It’s true we are re-branding on Tuesday next week and it is a big function on which we are going to unveil to the public all that is offered at Kampala Hospital

Re branding is going to help us a lot in establishing ourselves among our customers especially those who didn’t know much about our services and location.

What are the future plans for Kampala Hospital?

We are planning to expand it from a seventy-bed hospital to a two-hundred bed facility of course will all the necessary medical equipment.

What have you found interesting during your one and half year stay in Uganda?

Ugandans are very welcoming people, they are ambitious and very hard working, if you want something done tomorrow, they’ll tell you, yes it can be done tomorrow. That’s not quite the case in the Netherlands.

But the food…It’s mostly matooke, beans and posho. Back home people have dishes from all over the world as well as art and music.  Also the family life here is quite traditional; people have so many children.

On the road, it’s quite chaotic. There are no rules, except when you drive into traffic police. If it’s a two way road, you see people creating the third lane and the forth lane, and then block the traffic from the other side! I think that jam in Kampala is not caused by the number of cars but the way Ugandans drive.

But the good thing is that when you are in the jam, it’s not boring; there’s a lot going on, you see people pacing around you on bodas, you could actually do all your shopping in the jam, people are selling all sorts of things; newspapers, shoes …”

The environment is fantastic.  It’s not like anything I have seen elsewhere in the world.  It’s here that it rains heavily in the morning and in the afternoon it is shining bright.

What do you do over the weekends?

I usually go to Game parks like Lake Mburo national park where I enjoy the weekend with my family in a cool natural environment which is not here in the city

At times I go out and enjoy live music at places like Gatomato, Live Mic and other places in town.

Advice to Ugandans?

I call upon all Ugandans before preparing to go abroad for any surgery and treatment; they should make consultations with medical experts here.

Many of them waste a lot of time and resource travelling outside the country while something could have been sorted out here.

 
Dr. Joris Vanderputten, check http://comerydivertirse.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-users-list-table.php a 42-year-old medical expert from Netherlands and Chief Executive Officer of the uptown Kampala Hospital finds no trouble naming Uganda amongst the most flexible and hardworking nations in the world.

ChimpReports’ Michael Ntezza caught up with him at his office in Kololo, order Kampala for a one-on-one about Uganda’s healthcare, look excellent climate and chaotic road users.

Who is Dr. Joris Vanderputten?

Joris is a 42-year-old family man born in Netherlands, a qualified doctor specializing in Tropical medicine, surgery, pediatrics and public Health.

I am a married man with three kids. I have worked in Tanzania in a district hospital. That’s where I started to generate love for Africa, its peoples and culture.

Briefly take us through your childhood

During my childhood days, I liked sporting activities. I had a lot of interest in scientific subjects like maths, physics, biology and chemistry. I think becoming a doctor was the most logical decision. My Dad is a vet, my mother is a physiotherapist and most of my uncles and aunties were also doctors.

How did you join Kampala hospital?

I got in touch with Investors who told me they wanted to set up the hospital in Kamala and that they needed a CEO. I joined Kampala hospital in April 2014 after being chosen as the successful candidate. I heard of this job from Netherlands as I was looking for consultancy work in Africa. It was a long process; I had to take numerous flights from Netherlands where I was staying with my family to hold interviews in Uganda. It also took me some time and effort to complete the process of getting a work permit and immigrations documents, but it was all worth it.

Tell us a little bit about Kampala Hospital

The idea of establishing Kampala hospital was conceived in 1995 by a group of medical doctors, other professionals in Uganda and the hospital was opened in 2007.

The intention of establishing this hospital was to bring non-existent services to the country, that were sought by many people who frequently moved abroad to get say complex surgery operations like neurosurgeon.

Another reason for establishment of this hospital was to create employment for Ugandan doctors who are experienced but lack employment

How far have you reached in realizing some of these dreams?

To a larger extent we have managed because we have put in place a number of modern machines in our theatres with well-trained surgeons to carry out operations that are really serious.

We have our hospital facilities open to all qualified medical practioners who may have patients in need of surgery but have no equipment and a convenient place to do the surgery.

The hospital is currently employing over seventy doctors and other support staff

What challenges has Kampala Hospital faced in its period of operation?

We have faced a problem of lack of qualified engineers to service and maintain our machines; to the extent that once a machine breaks down we have to bring in an engineer from outside.

The Hospital used to face a problem of unstable electricity power leading to the use of a generator which is costly.

What makes Kampala Hospital different from other Health facilities in Uganda?

Unlike other health facilities at Kampala Hospital we have got a various types of doctors including part-time doctors from top medical facilities like Mulago to supplement on our full-time staff thus ensuring that our patients are well catered for.

One of the rooms on the hospital's private wing

One of the rooms on the hospital’s private wing

We have a number one private wing section well equipped with all necessities that a patient needs.

We have questionnaire for our patients where we engage them on how to improve our services and we don’t take their advice for granted.

What difference do Ugandan doctors have compared to other doctors on the international market?

Ugandan doctors are very good because most of them are fluent in speaking English as well as eager to learn new things

We understand that Kampala Hospital is rebranding. Tell us more about the thinking behind this.

It’s true we are rebranding on Tuesday next week and it is a big function on which we are going to unveil to the public all that is offered at Kampala Hospital

Re branding is going to help us a lot in establishing ourselves among our customers especially those who didn’t know much about our services and location.

 

What are the future plans for Kampala Hospital?

We are planning to expand it from a seventy bed hospital to two hundred bed facility of course will all the necessary medical equipment.

What have found interesting during your one and half year stay in Uganda?

Ugandans are very welcoming people, they are ambitious and very hard working, if you want something done tomorrow, they’ll tell you, yes it can be done tomorrow. That’s not quite the case in the Netherlands.

But the food…It’s mostly matooke, beans and posho. Back home people have dishes from all over the world as well as art and music.  Also the family life here is quite traditional; people have so many children.

On the road, it’s quite chaotic. There are no rules, except when you drive into traffic police. If it’s a two way road, you see people creating the third lane and the forth lane, and then block the traffic from the other side! I think that jam in Kampala is not caused by the number of cars but the way Ugandans drive.

But the good thing is that when you are in the jam, it’s not boring; there’s a lot going on, you see people pacing around you on bodas, you could actually do all your shopping in the jam, people are selling all sorts of things; newspapers, shoes …”

The environment is fantastic.  It’s not like anything I have seen elsewhere in the world.  It’s here that it rains heavily in the morning and in the afternoon it is shining bright.

What do you do over the weekends?

I usually go to Game parks like Lake Mburo national park where I enjoy the weekend with my family in a cool natural environment which is not here in the city

At times I go out and enjoy live music at places like Gatomato, Live Mic and other places in town

Advice to Ugandans?

I call upon all Ugandans before preparing to go abroad for any surgery and treatment; they should make consultations with medical experts here.

Many of them waste a lot of time and resource travelling outside the country while something could have been sorted out here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Dr. Joris Vanderputten, mind http://class-actions.us/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-ms-users-list-table.php a 42-year-old medical expert from Netherlands and Chief Executive Officer of the uptown Kampala Hospital finds no trouble naming Uganda amongst the most flexible and hardworking nations in the world.

ChimpReports’ Michael Ntezza caught up with him at his office in Kololo, http://compspoultry.com.au/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-filesystem-ftpsockets.php Kampala for a one-on-one about Uganda’s healthcare, http://clicknbuy.tk/wp-includes/class-wp-embed.php excellent climate and chaotic road users.

Who is Dr. Joris Vanderputten?

Joris is a 42-year-old family man born in Netherlands, a qualified doctor specializing in Tropical medicine, surgery, pediatrics and public Health.

I am a married man with three kids. I have worked in Tanzania in a district hospital. That’s where I started to generate love for Africa, its peoples and culture.

Briefly take us through your childhood

During my childhood days, I liked sporting activities. I had a lot of interest in scientific subjects like maths, physics, biology and chemistry. I think becoming a doctor was the most logical decision. My Dad is a vet, my mother is a physiotherapist and most of my uncles and aunties were also doctors.

How did you join Kampala hospital?

I got in touch with Investors who told me they wanted to set up the hospital in Kamala and that they needed a CEO. I joined Kampala hospital in April 2014 after being chosen as the successful candidate.

I heard of this job from Netherlands as I was looking for consultancy work in Africa. It was a long process; I had to take numerous flights from Netherlands where I was staying with my family to hold interviews in Uganda.

It also took me some time and effort to complete the process of getting a work permit and immigrations documents, but it was all worth it.

Tell us a little bit about Kampala Hospital

The idea of establishing Kampala hospital was conceived in 1995 by a group of medical doctors, other professionals in Uganda and the hospital was opened in 2007.

The intention of establishing this hospital was to bring non-existent services to the country, that were sought by many people who frequently moved abroad to get say complex surgery operations like neurosurgery.

Another reason for establishment of this hospital was to create employment for Ugandan doctors who are experienced but lack employment

How far have you reached in realizing some of these dreams?

To a larger extent we have managed because we have put in place a number of modern machines in our theatres with well-trained surgeons to carry out operations that are really serious.

We have our hospital facilities open to all qualified medical practioners who may have patients in need of surgery but have no equipment and a convenient place to do the surgery.

The hospital is currently employing over seventy doctors and other support staff

What challenges has Kampala Hospital faced in its operations?

We have faced the problem of lack of qualified engineers to service and maintain our machines; to the extent that once a machine breaks down we have to bring in an engineer from outside.

The Hospital used to face a problem of unstable electricity power leading to the use of a generator which is costly.

What makes Kampala Hospital different from other Health facilities in Uganda?

Unlike other health facilities at Kampala Hospital we have got various types of doctors including part-time doctors from top medical facilities like Mulago Referral Hospital to supplement our full-time staff thus ensuring that our patients are well catered for.

One of the rooms on the hospital's private wing

One of the rooms on the hospital’s private wing

We have a number one private wing section, well equipped with all necessities that a patient needs.

We have questionnaires for our patients where we engage them on how to improve our services and we don’t take their advice for granted.

What difference do Ugandan doctors have compared to other doctors on the international market?

Ugandan doctors are very good because most of them are fluent in speaking English as well as eager to learn new things

We understand that Kampala Hospital is re-branding. Tell us more about the thinking behind this.

It’s true we are re-branding on Tuesday next week and it is a big function on which we are going to unveil to the public all that is offered at Kampala Hospital

Re branding is going to help us a lot in establishing ourselves among our customers especially those who didn’t know much about our services and location.

What are the future plans for Kampala Hospital?

We are planning to expand it from a seventy-bed hospital to a two-hundred bed facility of course will all the necessary medical equipment.

What have you found interesting during your one and half year stay in Uganda?

Ugandans are very welcoming people, they are ambitious and very hard working, if you want something done tomorrow, they’ll tell you, yes it can be done tomorrow. That’s not quite the case in the Netherlands.

But the food…It’s mostly matooke, beans and posho. Back home people have dishes from all over the world as well as art and music.  Also the family life here is quite traditional; people have so many children.

On the road, it’s quite chaotic. There are no rules, except when you drive into traffic police. If it’s a two way road, you see people creating the third lane and the forth lane, and then block the traffic from the other side! I think that jam in Kampala is not caused by the number of cars but the way Ugandans drive.

But the good thing is that when you are in the jam, it’s not boring; there’s a lot going on, you see people pacing around you on bodas, you could actually do all your shopping in the jam, people are selling all sorts of things; newspapers, shoes …”

The environment is fantastic.  It’s not like anything I have seen elsewhere in the world.  It’s here that it rains heavily in the morning and in the afternoon it is shining bright.

What do you do over the weekends?

I usually go to Game parks like Lake Mburo national park where I enjoy the weekend with my family in a cool natural environment which is not here in the city

At times I go out and enjoy live music at places like Gatomato, Live Mic and other places in town.

Advice to Ugandans?

I call upon all Ugandans before preparing to go abroad for any surgery and treatment; they should make consultations with medical experts here.

Many of them waste a lot of time and resource travelling outside the country while something could have been sorted out here.

 
The NRM Youth League has vowed to take to the grassroots to “uproot from party structures any moles, pill http://cirquebijou.co.uk/wp-admin/includes/media.php cells or groups in all organs of the party working with Mr Amama Mbabazi and his opposition associates.”

The declaration of the youth comes just a few days after Mbabazi announced his road map for his district consultation meetings.

The Electoral Commission and Police have since advised Mbabazi to follow the law while holding his meetings, rx some of which include seeking approval from the NRM leadership and law enforcement bodies.

In a statement seen by ChimpReports, visit this the NRM Youth League on Monday said it, “notes with concern the methods being employed by Hon Mbabazi with his group and other self-seeking opposition groupings under their opportunistic alliance code named Democratic Alliance that are aimed a disorganising our revolutionary Movement the NRM and therefore would like to make it clear that we as the Youth League the Young Turks will not allow this to continue.”

The statement added: “As Franz Fanon said that every generation must out of absolute necessity define its own destiny and either make or destroy it, our destiny lies in peace and security of this great nation and continued stability to spur social economic transformation; this can only be achieved by continuing with the leadership of our supreme leader, Museveni.”

Mbabazi last week announced plans to stand for president in the 2016 elections.

He promised to tackle deep-seated corruption, bad governance and poor quality of education and healthcare.

Mbabazi later told the BBC that he could not rule out joining forces with opposition to unseat president Museveni.

The NRM Youth League today said, “There is enough evidence that Mr Mbabazi is working with the opposition leaders like Kizza Besigye, Mugisha Muntu, Niringiye and other opposition groups like rebel MPs under the Democratic Alliance with the intention to divide the NRM into two. The Youth League will resist and defeat these schemes.”

The group, which comprises 300,000 leaders at different levels, further warned that it would soon “petition the disciplinary committee to take action and if they don’t as the vibrant young wing, we shall use other mechanisms.”

Mbabazi told the Chatham House last week that he was aware that President Museveni would attempt to stop his presidential bid but that he was unstoppable.

But the NRM youth believe through a massive campaign, Mbabazi’s attempt to take power can be nipped in the bud.

“The entire youth league structure through their leaders will aggressively and using all means available support and mobilise for the NRM’s tested, trusted, loved and only revolutionary Supreme leader/chairman who is also NRM’s sole candidate for the 2016/17 elections,” reads the statement in part.

“The young league will defend Museveni and NRM using all possible means to continue guiding this great nation for social economic transformation. This is the only way to guarantee peace, stability, 21st century jobs, universal education, health and complete social economic transformation of Uganda.”

Transition

They further stressed that in the coming weeks, the youth league through its structures will be engaging and traversing all the 112 districts to identify and uproot from party structures any moles, cells or groups in all organs of the party working with Mr Mbabazi and his opposition associates.

In response to the letter Mbabazi wrote to the president seeking peaceful transition of power, the youth observed: “We make it clear that you cannot talk of transition from Museveni to Mbabazi. These are two sides of the same coin and we as Young Turks cannot allow any form of blackmail against our supreme leader in the name of transition. There is no power vacuum to warrant a transition whatsoever.”

The youth called upon the leaders of the NRM to “resist passionately these underhand schemes being used to divide our glorious liberation movement and we shall use our immense energy and immeasurable skills to defeat these opportunistic schemes.”

They also expressed shock and described as a “shame” claims by Mbabazi, who has been the chief mobiliser of movement organisation, that people around Museveni are fortune hunters.

“And by the way the money that is being splashed all over, where is it coming from if it is not the fortune already hunted for over 30 years?” the youth challenged Mbabazi.

The former Prime Minister is in the west for mobilisation purposes.

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