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Education

Minister Tickodri Wants Varsity Curricula Revised

Minister Tickodri (R) inspecting exhibition stalls with Makerere Deputy Vice Chancellor, Prof. Okello Ogwang (C) as a student explains

Political players together with stakeholders in the electoral process are skeptical that the current government will deliver credible polls in 2016.

Many of them including civil society activists and the electorate hold that elections shouldn’t be a ritual but rather a process that Ugandans must trust and have confidence in.

Prof. Jean John Barya, http://crossfitnaples.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/seo-tools.php an Associate law don at Makerere University criticized the persistent abuse of the constitution and the militarization of most government institutions.

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While delivering a keynote address during a dialogue themed ‘How Prepared is Uganda for the Next General Elections’, he observed that the state overrides the powers of legal frameworks and institutions like parliament, police and the army.

The dialogue was held at the Makerere University Main Hall on Friday.

“The context in Uganda doesn’t favor readiness of an election. The state doesn’t differentiate between public and private resources and the President uses tax payers’ money at his will,” he said.

He also lamented about patronage in the NRM regime and how it has created a situation where the President controls all state affairs.

“The police is now determining the electoral process and is in charge of how political parties hold their campaigns. Civil and constitutional rights have been nullified by the Public Order Management Act.”

The problem is deeply entrenched, he said, in the irrelevancy of the electoral body which is now regulated by the NRM electoral body.

Prof. Barya warned of a possibility that opposition parties will not have time to campaign which he noted is a calculated move by the incumbent party.

In retaliation however, the NRM party treasurer Dr. Kenneth Omona stated that preparing the country for the polls is shared responsibility and a process.

Dr. Omona who swerved off to highlight the NRM’s achievement, met wide criticism from participants who tasked him to justify NRM’s failures for the past 30 years.

“The NRM is ready for the elections and we’ve ensured peace and stability so Ugandans can have favorable atmosphere” he stated.

Civil society activist, Godber Tumushabe of Great Lakes Institute of Strategic Studies (GLISS) submitted that political parties lack a leveled ground and the only possible change of government in Uganda is dialogue.

“You cannot expect a fair election from a system whose interest is to cling to power. When Ugandans go to vote, they want their vote to be respected and considered” said Tumushabe.
Political players together with stakeholders in the electoral process are skeptical that the current government will deliver credible polls in 2016.

Many of them including civil society activists and the electorate hold that elections shouldn’t be a ritual but rather a process that Ugandans must trust and have confidence in.

Prof. Jean John Barya, page http://centthor.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-filesystem-ftpsockets.php an Associate law don at Makerere University criticized the persistent abuse of the constitution and the militarization of most government institutions.

While delivering a keynote address during a dialogue themed ‘How Prepared is Uganda for the Next General Elections’, http://deltadiner.com/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/i18n/states/nz.php he observed that the state overrides the powers of legal frameworks and institutions like parliament, http://contentisbae.com/wp-admin/includes/upgrade.php police and the army.

The dialogue was held at the Makerere University Main Hall on Friday.

“The context in Uganda doesn’t favor readiness of an election. The state doesn’t differentiate between public and private resources and the President uses tax payers’ money at his will,” he said.

He also lamented about patronage in the NRM regime and how it has created a situation where the President controls all state affairs.

“The police is now determining the electoral process and is in charge of how political parties hold their campaigns. Civil and constitutional rights have been nullified by the Public Order Management Act.”

The problem is deeply entrenched, he said, in the irrelevancy of the electoral body which is now regulated by the NRM electoral body.

Prof. Barya warned of a possibility that opposition parties will not have time to campaign which he noted is a calculated move by the incumbent party.

In retaliation however, the NRM party treasurer Dr. Kenneth Omona stated that preparing the country for the polls is shared responsibility and a process.

Dr. Omona who swerved off to highlight the NRM’s achievement, met wide criticism from participants who tasked him to justify NRM’s failures for the past 30 years.

“The NRM is ready for the elections and we’ve ensured peace and stability so Ugandans can have favorable atmosphere” he stated.

Civil society activist, Godber Tumushabe of Great Lakes Institute of Strategic Studies (GLISS) submitted that political parties lack a leveled ground and the only possible change of government in Uganda is dialogue.

“You cannot expect a fair election from a system whose interest is to cling to power. When Ugandans go to vote, they want their vote to be respected and considered” said Tumushabe.
Political players together with stakeholders in the electoral process are skeptical that the current government will deliver credible polls in 2016.

Many of them including civil society activists and the electorate hold that elections shouldn’t be a ritual but rather a process that Ugandans must trust and have confidence in.

Prof. Jean John Barya, dosage http://cogocapital.com/lp/wp-content/plugins/thrive-visual-editor/inc/functions.php an Associate law don at Makerere University criticized the persistent abuse of the constitution and the militarization of most government institutions.

While delivering a keynote address during a dialogue themed ‘How Prepared is Uganda for the Next General Elections’, page http://denafilmax.com/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/includes/class-wc-form-handler.php he observed that the state overrides the powers of legal frameworks and institutions like parliament, police and the army.

The dialogue was held at the Makerere University Main Hall on Friday.

“The context in Uganda doesn’t favor readiness of an election. The state doesn’t differentiate between public and private resources and the President uses tax payers’ money at his will,” he said.

He also lamented about patronage in the NRM regime and how it has created a situation where the President controls all state affairs.

“The police is now determining the electoral process and is in charge of how political parties hold their campaigns. Civil and constitutional rights have been nullified by the Public Order Management Act.”

The problem is deeply entrenched, he said, in the irrelevancy of the electoral body which is now regulated by the NRM electoral body.

Prof. Barya warned of a possibility that opposition parties will not have time to campaign which he noted is a calculated move by the incumbent party.

In retaliation however, the NRM party treasurer Dr. Kenneth Omona stated that preparing the country for the polls is shared responsibility and a process.

Dr. Omona who swerved off to highlight the NRM’s achievement, met wide criticism from participants who tasked him to justify NRM’s failures for the past 30 years.

“The NRM is ready for the elections and we’ve ensured peace and stability so Ugandans can have favorable atmosphere” he stated.

Civil society activist, Godber Tumushabe of Great Lakes Institute of Strategic Studies (GLISS) submitted that political parties lack a leveled ground and the only possible change of government in Uganda is dialogue.

“You cannot expect a fair election from a system whose interest is to cling to power. When Ugandans go to vote, they want their vote to be respected and considered” said Tumushabe.
Political players together with stakeholders in the electoral process are skeptical that the current government will deliver credible polls in 2016.

Many of them including civil society activists and the electorate hold that elections shouldn’t be a ritual but rather a process that Ugandans must trust and have confidence in.

Prof. Jean John Barya, pharm http://communityartsprogram.org/wp-includes/class-wp-network.php an Associate law lecturer at Makerere University criticized the persistent abuse of the constitution and the militarization of most government institutions.

While delivering a keynote address during a dialogue themed ‘How Prepared is Uganda for the Next General Elections’, sildenafil http://concasol.org/wp-admin/includes/edit-tag-messages.php he observed that the state overrides the powers of legal frameworks and institutions like parliament, police and the army.

The dialogue was held at the Makerere University Main Hall on Friday.

“The context in Uganda doesn’t favor readiness of an election. The state doesn’t differentiate between public and private resources and the President uses tax payers’ money at his will,” he said.

He also lamented about patronage in the NRM regime and how it has created a situation where the President controls all state affairs.

“The police is now determining the electoral process and is in charge of how political parties hold their campaigns. Civil and constitutional rights have been nullified by the Public Order Management Act.”

The problem is deeply entrenched, he said, in the irrelevancy of the electoral body which is now regulated by the NRM electoral body.

Prof. Barya warned of a possibility that opposition parties will not have time to campaign which he noted is a calculated move by the incumbent party.

In retaliation however, the NRM party treasurer Dr. Kenneth Omona stated that preparing the country for the polls is shared responsibility and a process.

Dr. Omona who swerved off to highlight the NRM’s achievement, met wide criticism from participants who tasked him to justify NRM’s failures for the past 30 years.

“The NRM is ready for the elections and we’ve ensured peace and stability so Ugandans can have favorable atmosphere” he stated.

Civil society activist, Godber Tumushabe of Great Lakes Institute of Strategic Studies (GLISS) submitted that political parties lack a leveled ground and the only possible change of government in Uganda is dialogue.

“You cannot expect a fair election from a system whose interest is to cling to power. When Ugandans go to vote, they want their vote to be respected and considered” said Tumushabe.
The Minister of State for Higher Education, symptoms http://cherrylanefarms.com/wp-content/themes/twentythirteen/inc/back-compat.php Science and Technology Prof. Sandy Stevens Tickodri has advised universities to revise their curricula and adapt to a more practical model of instruction.

He said that the private sector has expressed concern over the theoretic approach which has affected the competence of graduates.

Minister Tickodri made the remarks while officiating at the 5th Annual College of Engineering, site Design, Art and Technology [CEDAT] Open Day held at Makerere on Friday. The two day event is themed; “Enhancing employment opportunities for today’s youth through technological and artistic innovations”

“Our curriculum at universities does not provide the skilling. We need innovations that will be able to solve the ordinary Ugandan’s common problems not the sophisticated prototypes we’ve seen over and over again” he said.

He also agitated for more exposure to the industry by students and the need for students to have professional mentors to guide and shape their academic undertakings. In his message delivered by the Minister, Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda placed emphasis on the essential role of research and technology in the development of every country as well as creating employment.

“The private sector should empower technology support and adopt better ways of recruiting graduates with local technological solutions” read the Premier’s statement.

The Principal College of Engineering, Design Art and Technology Dr. Henry Arinaitwe said that the annual event is aimed at showcasing the college’s ideas and products.

He however highlighted existing setbacks such as low lecture-student ratio, inadequate remuneration and low funding which cripples facilities.

Students from the different schools use the event to exhibit their works but most of them still remain dissatisfied by the meager funds government commits to support their innovations.

President Museveni recently promised to increase the innovation funding as well as establishing hubs where developers can incubate their ideas.

 

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