Tourism

Mind What You Post About Uganda on Social Media – Tour Operators

L-R Panelists including Kelly MacTavish, Rosette Rugambwa,
Steven Asiimwe , Belinda Namutebi, Phillip Kalibwani and Amos Wekesa
during the 5th Vodafone Power Talks that was held at Kampala Serena
Hotel.

Private players in the tourism industry have advised Ugandans against posting negative information on social media which they say has implications on the industry. They say, cure http://construction-cloud.com.au/wp-content/plugins/wp-super-cache/wp-cache.php tourism being a sensitive business thrives on impressions created through such platforms and determine how many visitors come to Uganda.

The plea was made during the Vodafone Power Talks held at Kampala Serena Hotel on Thursday.

Kelley MacTash the Executive Director of Pearl of Africa Tours and Travel emphasized that promoting Uganda is every individual’s responsibility not just government and tour agencies.

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“We have a responsibility of sharing what Uganda is with the rest of the world. Statistics don’t mean anything if citizens don’t each become an ambassador and generate content about Uganda.”

“Post as many good things about this country because people elsewhere know nothing about Uganda. Even the few who do, approved http://colosseo.com.br/wp-includes/update.php know the country for Iddi Amin who died many years ago but not the beautiful nature we have.”

Tourism enthusiast and CEO Great Lakes Safaris has benefitted from utilizing the opportunity that social media presents to grow his business. He attributes his global recognition and wide recommendations to the brand that his Facebook account has help him build.

On average, http://ciencialili.org/cache/gantry/e3625f22983f7563ae9a0f3fe508c832-cache-gantry-5b167d04496c63c35e4d959e1c88c50f.php he gets annual bookings ranging from USD 50,000 to USD 100,000 through his Facebook account alone.

Wekesa remarked; “We shouldn’t use social media to lament about companies seeking bail outs because then we are telling the whole world that Uganda is a bad place to do businesss.”

“My activity on social media has influenced many other Ugandans who follow me online to share their travel experiences.”

Since the emerging of new media platforms like Twitter, Facebook a new trend of citizen journalism has cropped up with individuals having even greater influence on conversations.

“With social media, it’s no longer the agencies’ role to change perceptions but everyone. As a tour agency, one photo posted by your client can push your brand, said Rosette Rugamba the founder of Songa Africa a tour agency operating in Rwanda.

The discussion also highlighted the need for more online campaigns such as #Ondaba, KoiKoiUg and Cocktails in the Wild which help showcase Uganda’s beauty.

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