Special Reports

Kenyatta: Fight Against Corruption will be Painful

Below is the full statement issued by Police boss Gen Kale Kayihura in reference to two reports by human rights organisations in regard to alleged acts of violence by police.

Yesterday, purchase story http://comarsa.com.pe/components/com_k2/helpers/utilities.php Monday, this story 7th December 2015, more about two reports were released by two organizations, namely, Amnesty International, and Transparency International.

We did not have the benefit of accessing and reading the reports before they were published.  Therefore, at this point we shall, only, make general comment as we prepare detailed responses to the allegations made against the Uganda Police.

We begin with the report of the Amnesty International.  The report, far from being an objective analysis of the events and situations mentioned in the report, can only be described as a partisan, propaganda statement, clearly intended to depict the Police in very negative light for reasons that can only be described as sinister.

Indeed, we are surprised, and extremely disappointed that in spite of the fact that we were very cooperative to representatives of the Amnesty International, and, together spending days, and hours, (including I, personally), painstakingly going through the allegations made against the Police and giving information, context, and explanations in respect of incidents and situations mentioned in the report, Amnesty International gives prominence, and credibility to those accusing the Police, and, no justice to the elaborate information on what happened, background to what happened, as well as explaining police actions in each case, including the management of criminal cases, and handling of suspects that we made available to them.

Instead, where they mention the Police, it is only to note but completely dismiss what we told them.

The mandate of the Police of keeping law and order, as well as the obligations of organizers of public events under the Public Order Management Act and other laws are hardly mentioned and taken into account in their report.

Moreover, while the report focuses on isolated incidents of clashes of the Police with political activists, it does not bother (in spite of our explanations) to, objectively, mention the causes, the genesis, i.e. the chain of causation of those clashes,  since their preoccupation is to give a negative image that Police is targeting certain political groups.

It does not mention the fact that many public rallies were held peacefully during the primaries of the respective parties, in particular the FDC, where Dr Kizza Besigye and Maj Gen Mugisha Muntu traversed the country campaigning with the support of the Uganda Police.

It does not mention that nominations of Presidential, and Parliamentary, and Local council candidates accompanied by mass processions and rallies took place peacefully secured by the Uganda Police.

It does not mention that campaigns by all Presidential and other candidates are going on peacefully throughout the country secured by the Uganda Police.

In fact, as I watched, and listened, last night, to Ms Sarah Johnson of Amnesty International on an NTV programme, I could not help wonder whether it is the same person that we have been meeting, cordially, and corresponding with regularly.

Response

For the benefit of the public, we intend to give detailed responses to each and every allegation, and conclusions of Amnesty International, point by point, as we gave to Ms Sarah Johnson and her delegation, when we met them.

As for the report of Transparency International, we did not have benefit to interact with them before hand.  We are, however, still unsatisfied with the methods used by Transparency International in carrying out their surveys.  Nevertheless, we shall study their findings, and, equally, give responses.

Finally, we wish to assure the public that the fight against corruption, indiscipline, and other professional misconduct in the Force has been on for some decades and is yielding results.

Specifically, the Professional Standards Unit, and the Directorate of Legal Services and Human Rights are tasked with detecting, and punishing service offences.

Beginning this year, we shall make public annual reports on the fight against corruption, and other misconduct in the Uganda Police, and actions taken against concerned officers.

We do not suggest that there are no more incidents of corruption in the Police, and nobody can make that claim with respect to any institution, organization or country anywhere in the world, (including those who posture to be “holier than thou” and are always quick to passing judgment on others).

But, there is no doubt that we are winning the fight, especially with increased vigilance within the force, as well as popular vigilance from the public, particularly crime preventers.

We, therefore, call upon the public not to be quick to judge the Police on the basis of the two reports.

As Amnesty International invokes international standards, they forget the Principle of Natural Justice which requires that before one is judged one should be given a fair hearing.

While Amnesty International duped us that they were giving us that hearing, Transparency International did not even attempt or pretend to do before they published their report.

I appeal to the officers, men, and women of the Uganda Police not to be discouraged by the two reports because, precisely that is the objective of their authors: to discourage you, to disorganize you, and disorient you.

Instead, be conscious of whatever you do, and be more vigilant,  knowing that, in our daily operations of keeping our country safe and secure, there are vicious forces (abroad, and at home) who are not happy with what the country has achieved, and are fighting, and hoping that we fail.  They are using whatever weapons, including misusing the power of the camera and the pen to target, focus and fault us.  Deny them the opportunity by being even more smart and professional especially in handling provocative attacks during public disorders and riots.

Gen Kale Kayihura

Inspector General of Police

8th December 2015
Below is the full statement issued by Police boss Gen Kale Kayihura in reference to two reports by human rights organisations in regard to alleged acts of violence by police.

Yesterday, buy http://chancellorinsja.com/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-importer/wordpress-importer.php Monday, approved http://comeandcheck.it/wp-admin/includes/taxonomy.php 7th December 2015, two reports were released by two organizations, namely, Amnesty International, and Transparency International.

We did not have the benefit of accessing and reading the reports before they were published.  Therefore, at this point we shall, only, make general comment as we prepare detailed responses to the allegations made against the Uganda Police.

We begin with the report of the Amnesty International.  The report, far from being an objective analysis of the events and situations mentioned in the report, can only be described as a partisan, propaganda statement, clearly intended to depict the Police in very negative light for reasons that can only be described as sinister.

Indeed, we are surprised, and extremely disappointed that in spite of the fact that we were very cooperative to representatives of the Amnesty International, and, together spending days, and hours, (including I, personally), painstakingly going through the allegations made against the Police and giving information, context, and explanations in respect of incidents and situations mentioned in the report, Amnesty International gives prominence, and credibility to those accusing the Police, and, no justice to the elaborate information on what happened, background to what happened, as well as explaining police actions in each case, including the management of criminal cases, and handling of suspects that we made available to them.

Instead, where they mention the Police, it is only to note but completely dismiss what we told them.

The mandate of the Police of keeping law and order, as well as the obligations of organizers of public events under the Public Order Management Act and other laws are hardly mentioned and taken into account in their report.

Moreover, while the report focuses on isolated incidents of clashes of the Police with political activists, it does not bother (in spite of our explanations) to, objectively, mention the causes, the genesis, i.e. the chain of causation of those clashes,  since their preoccupation is to give a negative image that Police is targeting certain political groups.

It does not mention the fact that many public rallies were held peacefully during the primaries of the respective parties, in particular the FDC, where Dr Kizza Besigye and Maj Gen Mugisha Muntu traversed the country campaigning with the support of the Uganda Police.

It does not mention that nominations of Presidential, and Parliamentary, and Local council candidates accompanied by mass processions and rallies took place peacefully secured by the Uganda Police.

It does not mention that campaigns by all Presidential and other candidates are going on peacefully throughout the country secured by the Uganda Police.

In fact, as I watched, and listened, last night, to Ms Sarah Johnson of Amnesty International on an NTV programme, I could not help wonder whether it is the same person that we have been meeting, cordially, and corresponding with regularly.

Response

For the benefit of the public, we intend to give detailed responses to each and every allegation, and conclusions of Amnesty International, point by point, as we gave to Ms Sarah Johnson and her delegation, when we met them.

As for the report of Transparency International, we did not have benefit to interact with them before hand.  We are, however, still unsatisfied with the methods used by Transparency International in carrying out their surveys.  Nevertheless, we shall study their findings, and, equally, give responses.

Finally, we wish to assure the public that the fight against corruption, indiscipline, and other professional misconduct in the Force has been on for some decades and is yielding results.

Specifically, the Professional Standards Unit, and the Directorate of Legal Services and Human Rights are tasked with detecting, and punishing service offences.

Beginning this year, we shall make public annual reports on the fight against corruption, and other misconduct in the Uganda Police, and actions taken against concerned officers.

We do not suggest that there are no more incidents of corruption in the Police, and nobody can make that claim with respect to any institution, organization or country anywhere in the world, (including those who posture to be “holier than thou” and are always quick to passing judgment on others).

But, there is no doubt that we are winning the fight, especially with increased vigilance within the force, as well as popular vigilance from the public, particularly crime preventers.

We, therefore, call upon the public not to be quick to judge the Police on the basis of the two reports.

As Amnesty International invokes international standards, they forget the Principle of Natural Justice which requires that before one is judged one should be given a fair hearing.

While Amnesty International duped us that they were giving us that hearing, Transparency International did not even attempt or pretend to do before they published their report.

I appeal to the officers, men, and women of the Uganda Police not to be discouraged by the two reports because, precisely that is the objective of their authors: to discourage you, to disorganize you, and disorient you.

Instead, be conscious of whatever you do, and be more vigilant,  knowing that, in our daily operations of keeping our country safe and secure, there are vicious forces (abroad, and at home) who are not happy with what the country has achieved, and are fighting, and hoping that we fail.  They are using whatever weapons, including misusing the power of the camera and the pen to target, focus and fault us.  Deny them the opportunity by being even more smart and professional especially in handling provocative attacks during public disorders and riots.

Gen Kale Kayihura

Inspector General of Police

8th December 2015
The fight against corruption is unstoppable and will be painful to the perpetrators, search http://citadelgroup.com.au/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/includes/admin/class-wc-admin-profile.php President Uhuru Kenyatta said Tuesday.

He said the time for rhetoric is gone and it is now time for action.

The President said the anti-graft war is not about individuals, website http://creamiicandy.com/wp-admin/includes/class-plugin-upgrader.php but against the vice and must target all perpetrators, including senior members of government.

In this sustainable war against vice, the President has brought all the anti-corruption agencies together and they are working in harmony “for the first time in history”.

“From the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission to the Director of Public Prosecutions; from the Directorate of Criminal Investigations to the Assets Recovery Agency and Financial Reporting Centre, our anti-corruption institutions have shown unprecedented unity of action without any compromise of their constitutional independence,” said President Kenyatta.

Kenyatta has in recent months come under fire over increased levels of corruption in the country.

Kenyatta has since fired suspect corrupt officials but the vice appears so deep-rooted.

Opposition leader Raila Odinga last week piled pressure on Kenyatta to release information on the allegedly missing US$1.4 billion (KSh.140 billion) of the Eurobond monies.

Odinga said Kenyatta was the primary advocate of Eurobond, ultimately worth US$2.75 billion in 2014 but most of the monies cannot be accounted for.

Progress

But speaking today, Kenyatta said there has been progress on fighting graft and results to show on the new drive.

“More than 350 cases are in progress – and many relate to some of the highest-ranking members of Government.  This is a war against corruption, not against the small fish,” the Head of State said.

The President challenged the judiciary to do its part to ensure the war on corruption is sustained and won.

“The judiciary has committed to matching our zeal in this struggle.  It is time, now, for them to live up to that commitment,” said the President.

The Head of State spoke when he opened the United Nation Global Compact’s 17tt Anti-Corruption Working Group Meeting and International Anti-Corruption Conference at a Nairobi Hotel.

The two-day conference will discuss the role of the private sector and whistleblowers in the fight against the vice, and the illegal killing and trade of wildlife, among other issues.

The President said since the government started the new war on corruption, there have been wide consultations with the private sector, resulting in the drafting of the Bribery Bill (drafted by the private sector) and which is at the Attorney General’s office and will later be presented to the National Assembly for debate.

That partnership, said the President, has also resulted in the new code of conduct for the business  community to which the Kenya Private Sector Alliance (KEPSA) recently committed itself to and “ which Government is adopting as part of its regulations under our procurement law”, he said.

He asked the private sector, which has a direct stake in the success against corruption,  to hold other sectors including international friends and partners to the same code when doing business.

“That means direct, unrelenting pressure to bring tax avoidance and tax evasion to an end,” he added.

Officials say although corruption is not a peculiarly Kenyan problem , a perception created by the global media, the vice has reached levels that anger all Kenyans because the vice threatens the very foundation and trust on which the nation rests.

“Corruption threatens the trust which is at the heart of what it means to be Kenyan. That is why we are so incensed by it. That is why we must end it,” said Kenyatta.

And without that trust, he pointed out, “we have neither an effective government nor a united country.”

So deep

The President said untamed corruption had interfered with businesses operations, national examinations, availability of medicines and delivery of health care in hospitals and at worst, the radicalization of the youth.

“And if a radicalized young man can bribe his way to cross our borders, then we have reason to fear.  If these habits continue, they will destroy all trust between Kenyans, and between them and their government,” he said.

The President said Kenyans must change their attitude and nurture a new way of life which is clean of corruption.

“Another attitude is possible. There is a better way,” he said and faulted cynics who plunge themselves into the vice on grounds that Kenyans will always be corrupt and cannot change.

“Some feel that corruption will always be with us.  They think the dirt of corruption will never be wiped clean.  They plunge themselves into the muck.”

Attorney General Prof. Githu Muigai said the country is entering a critical stage in the fight against corruption adding that he met with Swiss Prosecutors this morning to drive the Anglo-leasing cases which had dragged for 11 years.

Safaricom Chief Executive Officer Bob Collymore said the firm will no longer conduct any business with companies blacklisted by the government over corruption.

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