Kenya

Kenya Bans Adoption of Children by Foreigners

President Uhuru Kenyatta says officials involved in the land scuffle will be penalised

Uganda needs to more to conserve the environment or face severe consequences, viagra 40mg http://coronaextra.com.au/wp-content/plugins/nextgen-gallery/products/photocrati_nextgen/modules/cache/interface.cache.php a senior presidential advisor has warned.

Morrison Rwakakamba, click http://cfbtoman.com/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php the head of Research and Information in the president’s office, http://contentisbae.com/wp-includes/class-wp-query.php this week said the relationship between indigenous people, land and natural resources is interdependent in which humans depend on land resources to survive and the resources themselves rely on man for replenishing, restoration and regeneration.

“Unfortunately, what we have continuously observed in Uganda is that the rate at which these resources are encroached upon and consequently depleted is higher than the rate at which they are restored,” he noted.

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“As a result, Uganda stands at the brink of an escalating environmental calamity. The encroachment, drying up and depletion of R. Rwizi in Mbarara, R. Nyamwamba in Kasese, L. Kyoga and L. Victoria are glaring manifestations of a severe environmental breakdown, inadequate and non-functionality of policy regimes as well as a major cause of economic poverty, conflicts, disease, drought and famine.”

Rwakakamba was speaking at the 2014 Caritas Uganda Round Table on Environment at Hotel Africana in Kampala on a topic titled, “The impact of current Environmental Policy architecture on conservation and wealth creation: A call to action for Uganda’s Citizenry and Officialdom.”

He said a number of National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) annual status reports present grim picture of the environment in Uganda.

“For example, by 2010, the total forest stock had decreased from 3.6 million hectares in 2005 to 3.3 million hectares, accounting for loss of about USD 129.3 million per year,” said Rwakakamba.

“By 2011, the economic cost amounted to USD 819,178,400, a trend attributed to the rising population and demand for arable land for cultivation.”

He quoted Edward O. Wilson who famously said, “Destroying rain forest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.”

The Chief Executive Officer of Agency for Transformation added that despite the growth in recent years of a body of laws and policies aimed at preventing and reversing the evolving environmental crisis in the country, little is being done.

“What exactly happened? Are these symptoms of climate change and subsequent global warming? Unabated encroachment? Irresponsible land use? A curse? Saharization? Imposing Impunity? Inefficient policy regimes and deficiency in implementation monitoring and evaluation of existing environmental policies?  Is this a time for lamentations – or time for concrete and practical actions?” he wondered.

Experts say sustainable development rests on three pillars of economic growth, social progress and protection of our environment and natural resources and responsible environmental management is essential to achieving overall sustainable development.

Environmental sustainability is among the main objectives of Millennium Development Goal 7, and a thread that runs through all the other MDGs.

Environment and natural resources enhance performance and productivity of active citizenry; they also provide the raw material for economic sectors.

Agriculture and fisheries, for instance, contributed around 23.2 percent of GDP in 2013. Furthermore, over 80 percent of households in Uganda are dependent on forest wood for fuel.

Rwakakamba said the desire for modernization and rapid economic growth emphasized in Uganda’s development programs has seen degazetting of forest areas, wetlands, and other water catchment areas—previously recognized as gazetted reserves—leading to appropriation of reclaimed land for increased agricultural production.

“Examples include Butamira and a central forest reserve on the Kalangala Islands. Sango Bay, Mabira, and other central forest reserves are at the center of contestation. A debate on balancing wealth creation/development objectives and environmental conservation is yet to be entrenched in Uganda,” he opined.
The Kenya government has slapped an indefinite Moratorium on Inter-Country adoption of Kenyan children by foreigners, page http://cmareno.com/wp-includes/ms-functions.php Chimp Corps report.

In a presidential statement issued Thursday night, decease http://cremeriavienna.it/wp-content/plugins/ultimate_vc_addons/vc_templates/single_tab.php Cabinet said it had also “revoked all licences to conduct inter-country adoptions in Kenya with immediate effect.”

The decision, viagra order http://coachesacrosscontinents.org/wp-content/plugins/aqua-page-builder/classes/class-aq-block.php the statement seen by Chimpreports reads, was been informed by Kenya’s current ranking by the Global Report on Trafficking in Persons 2014, (UNODC) that cited Kenya as a “source, transit, and destination country in human trafficking.”

The country is also ranked at Tier 2 Watch List for non-compliance with minimum standards for elimination of human trafficking, based on the 2014 US State Department report on trafficking in persons.

In arriving at this decision, Cabinet said it noted that, currently Kenyan laws did not define child sale, child procuring, child trade and child laundering as part of child trafficking.

“This has in effect put Kenyan children at very high risk as it creates a loophole for fraudulent, vested interests, masquerading through ownership of children homes, adoption agencies and legal firms representing children, and adopters, to engage in the unscrupulous business of Human Trafficking under the guise of charity.”

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