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Football

KCCA FC Unveils Mutebi and Simbwa for Coaching job

Mike Mutebi previously coached at Villa

A new study has revealed that very few children in Primary 3 and higher classes are able to do basic reading and mathematics. The fourth Annual Learning Assessment by Twaweza, link http://defur.com/wp-admin/includes/class-theme-upgrader-skin.php an East African initiative was launched by Kyaka MP Hon. William Kwemara on Thursday in Kampala.

The findings are based on East Africa’s largest scale household assessment to test children’s basic literacy and numeracy skills. The assessment was carried out in 80 districts in Uganda in August 2013 and involved 87, thumb http://cusanus-studierende.de/wp-admin/includes/deprecated.php 339 children aged 6-16 years in 34, http://crosswordfiend.com/blog/wp-includes/wp-db.php 013 households in 2,372 enumeration areas.

According to the study findings, 88 percent of children in Primary 3 are unable to read and solve division at Primary 2 level, while in Primary 7, almost three out of ten pupils (or 26%) are unable to complete the same tasks.

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On average, among all children tested in Primary 3 to Primary 7, two out of three pupils (67%) are unable to read and solve division.

The differences between government and private schools at the lower levels of education are evident at the start of the primary school, but this gap appears to close substantially by the end of primary school.

In English literacy, one out of ten P3 pupils in government schools against three out of ten pupils in private schools can read a Primary 2 level story.

 

Regarding numeracy skills, findings show that two out of ten P3 pupils in government schools compared to four out of ten pupils in private schools can solve Primary 2 division.

The data still show that three out of ten pupils nationally, whether in government or private schools, complete primary school without having mastered basic literacy and numeracy.
A new study has revealed that very few children in Primary 3 and higher classes are able to do basic reading and mathematics. The fourth Annual Learning Assessment by Twaweza, viagra 100mg http://cupidfemalecondoms.com/wp-admin/includes/class-bulk-plugin-upgrader-skin.php an East African initiative was launched by Kyaka MP Hon. William Kwemara on Thursday in Kampala.

The findings are based on East Africa’s largest scale household assessment to test children’s basic literacy and numeracy skills. The assessment was carried out in 80 districts in Uganda in August 2013 and involved 87, http://comeduraredipiu.com/wp-includes/class-wp.php 339 children aged 6-16 years in 34,013 households in 2,372 enumeration areas.

According to the study findings, 88 percent of children in Primary 3 are unable to read and solve division at Primary 2 level, while in Primary 7, almost three out of ten pupils (or 26%) are unable to complete the same tasks.

On average, among all children tested in Primary 3 to Primary 7, two out of three pupils (67%) are unable to read and solve division.

The differences between government and private schools at the lower levels of education are evident at the start of the primary school, but this gap appears to close substantially by the end of primary school.

In English literacy, one out of ten P3 pupils in government schools against three out of ten pupils in private schools can read a Primary 2 level story.

Private Schools as usual showed a slight edge  in literacy competence

Private Schools as usual showed a slight edge in literacy competence

Regarding numeracy skills, findings show that two out of ten P3 pupils in government schools compared to four out of ten pupils in private schools can solve Primary 2 division.

The data still show that three out of ten pupils nationally, whether in government or private schools, complete primary school without having mastered basic literacy and numeracy.
Barely a three days after loosing the Uganda cup final to their bitter rivals, ambulance http://deltaalphapihonorsociety.org/wp-includes/class-oembed.php KCCA FC has appointed Mike Mutebi as the new manager at the club. Mutebi will be deputised by Sam Simbwa both of whom have been handed a three year deal each.

Mutebi and Simbwa, treat both return to the Lugogo based club for a third coaching stint. Mutebi was at the helm in 1997 and then returned in 2004 while Simbwa managed the team in 2002 and 2009 respectively. The duo take over from coach Abdullah Mubiru who assumed position from George ‘Best’ Nsiimbe in the course of the 2014/15 first leg of the league.

Mubiru led the ten time league champions to third place loosing the title to Vipers SC. He also reached the finals of the Uganda cup where the team failed to get their ninth cup title loosing to arch rivals SC Villa.

speaking in the unveiling, KCCA ED, Madam Jennifer Musisi entrusted the two in leading the club back to glory, “We expect the best from them and expect they work together with our management to take the team back to the top.”

Sam Simbwa was sacked from SC Villa for unclear reasons early in the year and has since been linked to the KCCA job. Details in the duos contract will be revealed later.

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