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Kayihura: Why Museveni Trusts Me

Gen Kayihura hands the Community Policing Flag to President Yoweri Museveni at the Police centenary celebrations last year

The Inspector of Police Gen. Kale Kayihura has angrily confronted his critics, who attribute most of his registered achievements at the helm of the Police Force, to his ‘close personal relationship’ with President Yoweri Museveni.

Gen Kayihura stressed today that all the credit he has earned from President Yoweri Museveni had been by merit and not personal.

A vividly enraged Kayihura described as unfair and annoying, the arguments by some Ugandans that government‘s recent increased support to the police force was all thanks to his private ties with the President.

According to Forum for Democratic Change’s Hon Ssemujju Nganda, the Uganda Police Force would have remained untransformed and poorly funded, as it was over the past decades, if it was someone else at its helm.

Nganda, who also sits at the Parliamentary Defence and Internal Affairs Committee, says he personally supported Kayihura’s appointment, because only then would the old, unmotivated and impoverished force be transformed.

But Gen Kale stressed today that President Museveni admired him only as a professional officer, and not as personal buddy.

“I don’t know why people don’t see my achievements as the IGP and give credit to me,” said the General while appearing on the Capital Gang, a popular radio talk show.

“The President likes me. He likes my projects and he supports them because they are good initiatives. For instance our textile project he recently launched.”

Gen Kale added that he is also a good lobbyist as an individual, which explains why the force had managed to squeeze additional allocations from the Ministry of Finance, Parliament and of course with the consent of a gratified President Museveni.

Ever since the he took over from the former IGP, Katumba Wamala, a decade ago, General Kayihura has seen the force grow to more than 40,000 policemen, acquire better training, modern field equipment,  gear, vehicles, ambulances, fire trucks among others.

The welfare of the ordinary policemen has also slothfully by steadily improved, though a number of initiatives, by the IGP.

While celebrating the Force’s 100 years anniversary in October last year, President Museveni described Kayihura as a brave officer who had followed in the footsteps of his father John Kale, a reputed anti colonial crusader.

Explaining the unprecedented rise in the funding allocations to the force ever since he took over, Kayihura said that much of it was by coincidence.

“When I came in, we were at the end of an insurgency in the north. The then Humanitarian Action Plan under the OPM required that police presence in the region is restored and maintained. So we he had to recruit; and that attracted resources.”

But the biggest milestone in the police force’s enhanced share, Kayihura said, was the outbreak of the various riots in Kampala starting with the September 2009 Kabaka riots.

“Even Parliament appreciated that we didn’t have the capacity to handle public order, because we didn’t have the right equipment. Our anti-riot force had only 500 men. We needed teargas. We had to be funded; even if it was someone else at the helm.”

Gen Kayuhura however, expressed disgust at some individuals especially, opposition MPs who sit in the same parliament that approves Police funding, but later go on to concoct false theses about his personal ties with the President


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