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Inside Africa’s New Economic Environment

AFRICA CEO FORUM 2014 participants will discuss Africa's new economic environment

With the celebrations to mark the 29th anniversary of the NRM Victory Day underway in the country, abortion http://datedgear.com/wp-includes/ms-files.php Ugandans have opened their hearts to ChimpReports about their perception of this historic day.

According to Makolo Kavuma, http://cmd-kenya.org/institute/wp-includes/theme-compat/header.php a businessman along Nakivubo mews in Kampala, there is nothing to celebrate in the 29 years as the period has been marred with little or no development at all.

“There were a lot of industries where youth could work to earn a living but all were sold while others collapsed. Corruption has taken its toll on the country as it’s the order of the day unlike before,” explains Makolo.

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“The NRM government has always boasted of security but the northern region has been embedded in the war for the largest part of its rule.”

Innocent Tumusiime

Innocent Tumusiime

However, 69-year-old John Mukasa says government has done a lot in improving the transport network with the construction of roads and highways which he says have eased transport to even places which were previously referred to as hard-to-reach.

“The Tirinyi, Masaka and Mityana roads have eased transportation of goods to markets in Kampala which is a credit to the NRM government,” says Mukasa.

Ayub Luwangula also adds his voice to applaud the NRM government for improving the health sector during the last 29 years with many health centres at different levels making it easily accessible for all.

“The ongoing process of renovating Mulago hospital and the construction of big hospitals at each district headquarter throughout the country is a big achievement in the last 29 years, “explains Luwangula.

The 29-year-old businessman at Prime Complex however doesn’t mince words on blaming the NRM government for failure to combat the increasing corruption levels in the country which he says have led to loss of huge sums of monies.

 

“Most government officials have made it a habit to swindle money meant to provide social amenities to Ugandans .The recent Mukono-Katosi road saga can’t go unmentioned as one of the projects where government has lost huge sums to corrupt officials,” Luwangula adds.

On January 26, 1986, NRA fighters led by the then youthful Yoweri Kaguta Museveni captured Kampala bringing to an end a five-year protracted armed struggle.

Museveni promised a ‘fundamental change,’ saying the capture of power was not just a “mere change of guards”.

He has been on the steering while since then.

Ayub Luwangula (Photos: Kenneth Kazibwe/ChimpReports)

Ayub Luwangula (Photos: Kenneth Kazibwe/ChimpReports)

For Innocent Tumusiime have no simple words for what he calls failure by government in the last 29 years to tackle the unemployment problem which he says is a time bomb for Uganda.

“The crime rate most especially in the city centre has increased due to lack of jobs for youth to engage in and thus resorting to engaging in anything they think can earn them money. The quality of education has drastically gone down most especially in government schools where teachers receive little remuneration which discourages them from teaching and engage in private businesses,” Tumusiime explains.

However, for Martin Rukundo, the NRM government has been influential in reducing illiteracy rates in the country which he attributes to introduction of free education through Universal Primary Education and Universal Secondary Education which he says have enabled children for the poor to access education.

Rukundo further blames the NRM government for failure to improve agriculture which he says for long has been the backbone for Uganda’s economy.

Makolo Kavuma

Makolo Kavuma

“The NAADS program is a total failure used by officials to swindle money on the expense of the farmers who are suffering. How can one distribute 50 goats to 300 people? There are no demonstration farms put up where farmers can learn the new methods of agriculture and this is a big blow to development of the sector.”

Speaking today in Soroti, Museveni gave examples of the road infrastructural developments in Uganda which he said have enabled locals to access market for agricultural products and engage in trade.

Sam Abura, however, describes the 29 years of liberation as being a period of less progress but marred with regional imbalances and increased corruption levels throughout the country.

“Corruption is the song of the day in the country and this affects none other than the tax payers .Only a handful of people and areas have been able to develop through the 29 years with most of the development being in the West whereas other areas are left out suffering ,”Abura decries.

Margaret Namusisi

Margaret Namusisi

For 50 year-old Margret Namusisi from Mukono is a different story as she has for last 5 years had to travel monthly to Wandegeya a Kampala suburb to buy medicine for  high blood pressure which she says is not available  anywhere near her home.

“Every time I spend not less than Shs14, 000 for transport to get medicine yet sometimes I don’t get it. Government has failed to equip the health facilities in the upcountry areas well. Most of the hospitals don’t have drugs and the only way out is going to private clinics which are always expensive,” Namusisi explains.
With the celebrations to mark the 29th anniversary of the NRM Victory Day underway in the country, order http://cognac-ambassador.com/wp-content/plugins/contact-form-7/modules/really-simple-captcha.php Ugandans have opened their hearts to ChimpReports about their perception of this historic day.

According to Makolo Kavuma, capsule a businessman along Nakivubo mews in Kampala, there is nothing to celebrate in the 29 years as the period has been marred with little or no development at all.

“There were a lot of industries where youth could work to earn a living but all were sold while others collapsed. Corruption has taken its toll on the country as it’s the order of the day unlike before,” explains Makolo.

“The NRM government has always boasted of security but the northern region has been embedded in the war for the largest part of its rule.”

Innocent Tumusiime

Innocent Tumusiime

However, 69-year-old John Mukasa says government has done a lot in improving the transport network with the construction of roads and highways which he says have eased transport to even places which were previously referred to as hard-to-reach.

“The Tirinyi, Masaka and Mityana roads have eased transportation of goods to markets in Kampala which is a credit to the NRM government,” says Mukasa.

Ayub Luwangula also adds his voice to applaud the NRM government for improving the health sector during the last 29 years with many health centres at different levels making it easily accessible for all.

“The ongoing process of renovating Mulago hospital and the construction of big hospitals at each district headquarter throughout the country is a big achievement in the last 29 years, “explains Luwangula.

The 29-year-old businessman at Prime Complex however doesn’t mince words on blaming the NRM government for failure to combat the increasing corruption levels in the country which he says have led to loss of huge sums of monies.

 

“Most government officials have made it a habit to swindle money meant to provide social amenities to Ugandans .The recent Mukono-Katosi road saga can’t go unmentioned as one of the projects where government has lost huge sums to corrupt officials,” Luwangula adds.

On January 26, 1986, NRA fighters led by the then youthful Yoweri Kaguta Museveni captured Kampala bringing to an end a five-year protracted armed struggle.

Museveni promised a ‘fundamental change,’ saying the capture of power was not just a “mere change of guards”.

He has been on the steering while since then.

Ayub Luwangula (Photos: Kenneth Kazibwe/ChimpReports)

Ayub Luwangula (Photos: Kenneth Kazibwe/ChimpReports)

For Innocent Tumusiime have no simple words for what he calls failure by government in the last 29 years to tackle the unemployment problem which he says is a time bomb for Uganda.

“The crime rate most especially in the city centre has increased due to lack of jobs for youth to engage in and thus resorting to engaging in anything they think can earn them money. The quality of education has drastically gone down most especially in government schools where teachers receive little remuneration which discourages them from teaching and engage in private businesses,” Tumusiime explains.

However, for Martin Rukundo, the NRM government has been influential in reducing illiteracy rates in the country which he attributes to introduction of free education through Universal Primary Education and Universal Secondary Education which he says have enabled children for the poor to access education.

Rukundo further blames the NRM government for failure to improve agriculture which he says for long has been the backbone for Uganda’s economy.

Makolo Kavuma

Makolo Kavuma

“The NAADS program is a total failure used by officials to swindle money on the expense of the farmers who are suffering. How can one distribute 50 goats to 300 people? There are no demonstration farms put up where farmers can learn the new methods of agriculture and this is a big blow to development of the sector.”

Speaking today in Soroti, Museveni gave examples of the road infrastructural developments in Uganda which he said have enabled locals to access market for agricultural products and engage in trade.

Sam Abura, however, describes the 29 years of liberation as being a period of less progress but marred with regional imbalances and increased corruption levels throughout the country.

“Corruption is the song of the day in the country and this affects none other than the tax payers .Only a handful of people and areas have been able to develop through the 29 years with most of the development being in the West whereas other areas are left out suffering ,”Abura decries.

Margaret Namusisi

Margaret Namusisi

For 50 year-old Margret Namusisi from Mukono is a different story as she has for last 5 years had to travel monthly to Wandegeya a Kampala suburb to buy medicine for  high blood pressure which she says is not available  anywhere near her home.

“Every time I spend not less than Shs14, 000 for transport to get medicine yet sometimes I don’t get it. Government has failed to equip the health facilities in the upcountry areas well. Most of the hospitals don’t have drugs and the only way out is going to private clinics which are always expensive,” Namusisi explains.
Falling raw materials prices, website like this http://colosseo.com.br/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/sync/class.jetpack-sync-users.php health crises, this security threats and so on have led the International Monetary Fund to adjust its growth forecast for Africa downward. What are the implications for African businesses?

The official theme of the upcoming AFRICA CEO FORUM is “Africa’s new economic environment”.

The agenda will focus primarily on the development priorities of African businesses.

Officials say this is in line with the original purpose of the forum which, since its inception in 2012, has established itself as the must-attend event for the African private-sector.

800 leading decision-makers from Africa and all over the world – including 500 top CEOs from over 30 African countries – will be attending the 2015 edition of the forum on 16 and 17 March in Geneva.

Africa’s economic outlook will be discussed in depth, particularly at the opening plenary session. Experts and delegates will discuss the growth paths of Africa’s economies over the next five years.

The time for this discussion is more relevant than ever: several African countries have been weakened by falling oil and mineral prices while others, which are less dependent on raw materials, are seeing new opportunities open up. It remains to be seen exactly what and where these new opportunities are, and how they can be leveraged.

The 2015 AFRICA CEO FORUM will also address the subject of Africa’s competitiveness, which is a crucial factor for businesses.

The organisers – led by Groupe Jeune Afrique and the African Development Bank – have decided to tackle the issue of the famous Doing Business index which, every year, measures progress in the business environment of 189 countries.

The question that will be asked in Geneva is very simple: why is Africa lagging behind (there are 36 African countries in the bottom 50) when Georgia, which is also an emerging economy, has climbed 100 places in eight years and is now in the top ten?

“We are guessing that political decision makers will offer a different perspective to their business counterparts. The discussions promise to be lively,” said the Africa CEO Forum in a statement seen by ChimpReports on Monday.

The urban explosion in Africa will also be high on the agenda at the forum. The focus here will not be on questions of urban planning, but rather what share of the 25 billion dollars-a-year consumer market African businesses can tap into, and under what conditions.

Because of their invaluable grass-roots knowledge of transport, networks of all kinds, trade, planning, building and other (new) sectors in Africa, they could play a decisive role in structuring African cities and making them more productive.

The 2015 AFRICA CEO FORUM will also feature thematic conferences and practical seminars. Led by experts from Africa and all over the world, they will give the participants an opportunity to discuss growth sectors and the latest trends in business management and development.

In addition, some new and highly innovative meeting formats will be introduced to give the business leaders, investors and financiers gathered in Geneva an opportunity to share their experiences, present their projects, find funds or new partners.

Attendance

With less than two months to go before the Forum’s doors open, many prominent figures from Africa and all over the world have already confirmed their participation in the high-level meetings and discussions that will be held at the 2015 AFRICA CEO FORUM.

This upcoming gathering of top African private-sector organisations promises to be just as successful as previous editions and participation should, once again, reach a record high.

The following prominent figures have already confirmed their attendance: Jonathan Oppenheimer, Director, E. Oppenheimer & Son; Issad Rebrab, Chairman of Cévital; Adewale Tinubu, CEO of Oando; Mo Ibrahim, Chairman of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation; Jean Kacou Diagou, Chairman of NSIA; Pierre-André Terisse, Managing Director Africa of Danone; Alioune Ndiaye, Managing Director of Sonatel; Henri-Claude Oyima, CEO of BGFI and Daphne Mashile-Nkosi, CEO of Kalagadi Manganese.

Others are Carlos Lopes, Executive Secretary of UNECA; Salwa Akhannouch, CEO of the Aksal group; Robert Yildirim, Chairman of Yildirim Group; Dr. Chris Kirubi, Chairman of Haco Tigers Brands; Mohammed Bennani, CEO of Bank of Africa; Oba Otudeko, Chairman of Honeywell Group and numerous African finance ministers.

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