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How ADF Commander Jamil Mukulu Eluded Death in DRC

Jamil Mukulu and the ADF high command (UN photos)

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Anguyo who is yet to earn a senior Uganda Cranes cap made his mark at Gor Mahia two years ago.

More undoubtedly is to follow.

 

 
A new United Nations report has revealed that a military camp where rebel Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) Supreme Commander, treat http://copdx.org.au/wp-includes/capabilities.php Jamil Mukulu was based, came under heavy gunfire from DRC forces just moments after the leader of the terrorist group had fled.

The ADF remains one of the most dangerous rebel groups in Eastern Congo, with battle-hardened and Islamic extremist fighters.

On 16 January 2014, the Congolese army launched Operation Sukola I against ADF. Advancing on several fronts, the army moved deep into ADF territory and pushed it out of many of its forest camps, sustaining and inflicting many casualties in the process.

Early in April, as the Congolese army was approaching Madina, said the UN investigation report, the site of the main camp and last stronghold of ADF, ADF split into two groups.

One group, led by ADF leader and sanctioned individual Jamil Mukulu, left the Madina camp at night, a few days before the Congolese army took over on 16 and 17 April.

Mukulu, whose main objective is to remove President Museveni from power and install a Muslim leader, departed with approximately 30 people, including some 17 senior ADF leaders and most of his family.

Among those in the Mukulu group were Richard Muzei (Mukulu’s son), Bisasso (chief of finance), Kikutte (a deputy army commander), Magezi Abdul (deputy of internal security, see annex 9), Benjamin Kisokeranyo (senior adviser to Mukulu) and several other long-term ADF commanders and members of the ADF society of elite leaders called “the 8,000” or Kanana.

“As of late November, the whereabouts of Mukulu and approximately 30 senior leaders and family members who left with him remain unknown,” said the report released recently.

“Based on testimonies from ADF ex-combatants, dependants and bazana, as well as sources in Beni, the Group believes that the Mukulu group remains in North Kivu, somewhere between the ADF former strongholds north-east of Beni town and the town of Butembo.”

The ADF commander was trained by Al Qaeda in the Middle East. UN maintains it’s yet to find evidence linking ADF to the global sponsors of terrorism.

In Uganda, Mukulu is accused of pressuring Muslim clerics in Uganda to recruit members for his force. Those who have resisted the pressure, according to police boss Gen Kale Kayihura, have been killed.

The police boss recently revealed that it was highly possible that most of the murdered Muslim clerics since 2012 have been gunned down by ADF insurgents.

“While we are not ruling out other motives in individual cases, there is strong evidence linking these murders to Al Qaeda affiliate ADF,” Kayihura explained while addressing journalists at the Police Headquarters in Naguru in early January.

“We have credible intelligence which indicates that the majority of these clerics have been targeted because of their refusal to embrace extremist theocratic ideology; one which promotes the use of violence and terrorism as a tool of social, religious and political change.”

Baluku group

United Nations said after the departure of the Mukulu group, Seka Baluku was in command of the remaining ADF. Baluku immediately began to evacuate the Madina camp, which at that time contained approximately 1,000-1,200 people. The Baluku group initially moved to camp AKBG, approximately 2 km north of the Madina camp.

The evacuation from Madina lasted several days, after which Baluku led everyone out of camp AKBG and deeper into the forest. There was no decisive battle for the Madina camp; the few dozen ADF defenders left behind withdrew when the Congolese army began its assault.

Many senior ADF leaders remained with the Baluku group including Hood Lukwago (army commander), Kalume (a deputy army commander), Nasser (chief of combat operations), Recoilance (chief of internal security), Muzzanganda (armorer), Adam (assistant armorer), Fezza (senior commander), Werason (training instructor), Rafiki (training instructor) and Mwanje (deputy chief of finance).

In May and June, the Congolese army pursued Baluku’s ADF group deeper into the forest.

According to the report, “The army repeatedly engaged ADF soldiers, who usually deployed away from the main group, although ex-combatants and a muzana told the Group that a surprise attack by the army in May killed dozens of ADF soldiers and civilians.”

By mid-June, Baluku’s group was growing weaker and smaller. In addition to losing people in combat, the group saw some of its members escape owing to the fact that ADF was in almost constant movement.

The Baluku group was also out of reach of food supplies and deliveries from the ADF network. ADF ex-combatants, dependants and bazana told the Group that ADF experienced a period of famine that started in late June and lasted into August. During that period, the Group estimates that at least 200 people, most of them children, starved to death.

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