Health

First Lady Calls for Refocusing on ABC Strategy

First Lady Janet Museveni with some of the EMTCT stakeholders who were appreciated for having been behind the successful launching of all the 11 EMTCT Champaigns

Ugandan police have arbitrarily arrested political opposition leaders and used excessive force to disperse peaceful political gatherings, order http://demcsb.com/wp-includes/class-wp-image-editor-gd.php hindering the ability of Ugandans to receive information and engage with politicians in the lead-up to elections, for sale http://danielpyne.com/wp-content/plugins/bbpress/templates/default/bbpress/loop-single-forum.php according to a new Amnesty International report.

The report, viagra http://clouda.ca/wp-content/plugins/simple-lightbox/includes/class.admin_view.php “We come in and disperse them”, that was launched on Monday documents a range of human right violations between July and October 2015.

It is based on 88 interviews with torture victims, eyewitnesses and senior police officers, as well as analysis of video footage.

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Fatuma Zainab, was mishandled and dragged along the ground by police officers until her clothes started coming off

Fatuma Zainab, was mishandled and dragged along the ground by police officers until her clothes started coming off

“Members of the political opposition, including their presidential candidates, have been repeatedly placed under “preventive arrest” and police have indiscriminately fired tear gas and rubber bullets at peaceful demonstrators,” the reports notes.

“All Ugandans must be free to attend political rallies and engage with candidates, regardless of their political affiliations,” said Muthoni Wanyeki, Amnesty International’s Regional Director for East Africa, the Horn and the Great Lakes.

“The Ugandan authorities must put an immediate end to the harassment and torture of political opponents and urgently, thoroughly and transparently investigate the use of excessive force against peaceful demonstrators. Anyone found responsible for these violations must be brought to justice,” she added.

The global human rights body has urged the Ugandan government to publish guidelines on policing assemblies, including the use of tear gas, which meet international standards.

Cited Cases

On July 9, 2015 two leading political opposition presidential candidates, Kizza Besigye and former Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi  were put under arrest.

Although they were released on the same day, their arrests prevented them from holding planned consultations with voters.

Amama Mbabazi’s head of security, Christopher Aine, was arrested in Kampala on September 14, 2015. He claims to have been hit with iron bars and canes while in detention.

According to Amnesty International, when they interviewed him on the day after his release, his body was covered in cuts and bruises and showed evidence of torture.

Kizza Besigye was stopped by police when he tried to travel to Rukungiri in Western Uganda on October 10 and members of his team were arrested.

Fatuma Zainab, was dragged along the ground by police officers until her clothes started coming off.

The police have frequently used excessive force to break up political gatherings organized by political opposition parties.

A video obtained by Amnesty International shows police hurling tear gas canisters and indiscriminately firing rubber bullets into a peaceful crowd in the town of Soroti.

“The authorities must take action to rein in the police in the run up to the elections and ensure that their actions conform to both national and international standards,” Muthoni Wanyeki said.

“Peaceful gatherings should be allowed to take place unhindered and the use of force against people attending them cannot be tolerated. Attempts by police to justify their actions are disturbing and unacceptable,” said Muthoni Wanyeki.
Ugandan police have arbitrarily arrested political opposition leaders and used excessive force to disperse peaceful political gatherings, dosage http://celstec.biz/wp-includes/class-wp-customize-panel.php hindering the ability of Ugandans to receive information and engage with politicians in the lead-up to elections, look according to a new Amnesty International report.

The report, “We come in and disperse them”, that was launched on Monday, documents a range of human right violations between July and October 2015.

It is based on 88 interviews with torture victims, eyewitnesses and senior police officers, as well as analysis of video footage.

Fatuma Zainab, was mishandled and dragged along the ground by police officers until her clothes started coming off

Fatuma Zainab, was mishandled and dragged along the ground by police officers until her clothes started coming off

“Members of the political opposition, including their presidential candidates, have been repeatedly placed under “preventive arrest” and police have indiscriminately fired tear gas and rubber bullets at peaceful demonstrators,” the reports notes.

“All Ugandans must be free to attend political rallies and engage with candidates, regardless of their political affiliations,” said Muthoni Wanyeki, Amnesty International’s Regional Director for East Africa, the Horn and the Great Lakes.

“The Ugandan authorities must put an immediate end to the harassment and torture of political opponents and urgently, thoroughly and transparently investigate the use of excessive force against peaceful demonstrators. Anyone found responsible for these violations must be brought to justice,” she added.

The global human rights body has urged the Ugandan government to publish guidelines on policing assemblies, including the use of tear gas, which meet international standards.

Cited Cases

On July 9, 2015 two leading political opposition presidential candidates, Kizza Besigye and former Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi  were put under arrest.

Although they were released on the same day, their arrests prevented them from holding planned consultations with voters.

Amama Mbabazi’s head of security, Christopher Aine, was arrested in Kampala on September 14, 2015. He claims to have been hit with iron bars and canes while in detention.

According to Amnesty International, when they interviewed him on the day after his release, his body was covered in cuts and bruises and showed evidence of torture.

Kizza Besigye was stopped by police when he tried to travel to Rukungiri in Western Uganda on October 10 and members of his team were arrested.

Fatuma Zainab, was dragged along the ground by police officers until her clothes started coming off.

The police have frequently used excessive force to break up political gatherings organized by political opposition parties.

A video obtained by Amnesty International shows police hurling tear gas canisters and indiscriminately firing rubber bullets into a peaceful crowd in the town of Soroti.

“The authorities must take action to rein in the police in the run up to the elections and ensure that their actions conform to both national and international standards,” Muthoni Wanyeki said.

“Peaceful gatherings should be allowed to take place unhindered and the use of force against people attending them cannot be tolerated. Attempts by police to justify their actions are disturbing and unacceptable,” said Muthoni Wanyeki.
The First Lady and Minister for Karamoja Affairs, website http://csautomation.net/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/templates/myaccount/my-orders.php Janet Kataha Museveni on Friday launched the elimination of mother to child transmission of HIV/AIDS (EMTCT) campaign in the South- western region of Uganda with a strong call to refocus on the ABC strategy as the primary HIV prevention intervention.

“We need and must refocus our primary prevention interventions which are premised on the ABC. We preached ABC without any apology and it made great impact on reducing the HIV/AIDS infections. We must now go back to talking about the ABC for which Uganda is well known, medications ” she said.

The First Lady, sale who is Uganda’s advocacy champion for the Elimination of mother to child transmission, was addressing EMTCT stakeholders from the 14 Districts in South-Western Uganda during a Consultative meeting she hosted at her country home in Rwakitura.

Janet Museveni emphasized the importance of a synergistic  implementation of the structural, behavioral and biomedical interventions including HIV counseling and testing (HCT); Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission (EMTCT), Safe Male Circumcision, STD

She said that although the focus of the EMTCT campaigns across the country has been on elimination of mother to child transmission, they have also been used to raise awareness and knowledge on HIV prevention and control across the general population and for the groups that are disproportionately affected by the epidemic.

“We want to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in general as we also focus on the vulnerable children who get infected from their mothers,” Mrs. Museveni said.

According to the AIDS Indicator Survey that was conducted in 2011, the HIV prevalence in the Country stands at 7.3 percent.

The epidemic is higher among women at 8.2 percent compared to men at 6.1 percent.

The Survey also indicates that in the South Western Region of Uganda, HIV prevalence is higher than the national average; it stands at 8.0 percent (women 9.0 percent, men 6.6 percent).

“This must worry all of us. We must address this big burden of HIV in the region,” Janet Museveni said.

The First Lady was concerned that the country continues to experience many new HIV infections saying that though it is gratifying that new infections have reduced from 147,000 in 2011 to 99,000 in 2014, this is still a big number.

Janet Museveni called upon the women, men and families to fully utilize services for EMTCT.

She encouraged pregnant women to always attend ANC for all four required times during pregnancy. She also asked HIV infected mothers already enrolled on the EMTCT program to remain in care and take their medicine all the time.

She also implored the families to take charge of their primary responsibility of guiding the young in order to address the teenage pregnancy problem.

 

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