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Eritrean Orthodox Church Sues Uganda Counterparts Over Land

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A picture of an orthodox church

The Eritrean Orthodox church has sued their counterpart in Uganda over a land conflict.

The Eritrean church claims that the Uganda Orthodox Church allowed it to make developments on their land and then turned around to threaten to evict them without compensation.

According to a sworn affidavit by the Vice Chairperson of the Eritrean Council, Tsegai Kesete Gherememariam, the Uganda Orthodox church in 2006 gave their church part of its land measuring over an acre at Lubya Hill in Kampala to occupy for an indefinite period.

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Tsegai claims that the Eritrean church, based on the representations of the respondent (Uganda Orthodox Church), developed the said land, using Shs485m in the process.

The Eritrean church claims that after developing the respondent’s land, they suddenly turned around and sought to evict them without compensation for the developments on the said land.

They are now asking court to grant an injunction restraining the respondents from evicting them before the determination of the main suit since they will not have enough time to secure alternative land to establish a place of worship and its followers.

According to a letter dated July 3, 2016 from the Uganda Orthodox Church addressed to Eritrea Orthodox Tewahido Church, a copy of which ChimpReports has seen, the former asked the latter to vacate the said land in a period of one year.

In the letter, the Uganda Orthodox Church further asked the Eritrea Orthodox Tewahido Church to make no more structural development and leave peacefully.

“We have learned that you have gone behind our backs and requested for a land lease from Buganda Kingdom on the land we have hosted you on since 2006. In our letter dated August 9, 2006, our church in the spirit of brotherhood, hosted your Orthodox community on a temporary basis and requested you after making your church constitution and registration by the government of Uganda to eventually secure a permanent place of your own,” reads part of the letter.

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