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Drunken Bodaboda Riders Cautioned

At 7:00pm on Wednesday, pilule http://coeurdepirate.com/wp-admin/includes/class-theme-upgrader-skin.php Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza attempted to fly back to Bujumbura.

As his delegation prepared suitcases for loading on the plane, viagra approved http://civilianpeaceservice.ca/wp-includes/rss-functions.php a telephone call from Bujumbura came in; warning that landing at the airport would be difficult as an elite military unit loyal to Gen Godefroid Niyombare had taken charge.

Diplomatic sources say Nkurunziza had earlier received assurance from General Prime Niyongabo, help http://cirgroup.com/typo3conf/ext/tt_address/class.tx_ttaddress_tcefunc_selecttreeview.php that he was in control of the situation.

“Nkurunziza was determined to return to Bujumbura. But Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete told him to cancel the plan as it clearly jeopardised his life,” said a highly placed source.

At around 7:30pm, Gen Niyombare directed the switching off of security lights at Bujumbura airport.

The airport was shut down and aviation staff directed to return home.

Several flights to Bujumbura were redirected to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport.

Most government telephone lines were switched off for the better part of Wednesday night in what appeared a move to block communication between Nkurunziza and his political and military supporters in Bujumbura.

According to latest intelligence, Nkurunziza spent Wednesday night at Serena Hotel, Dar es Salaam.

On Thursday morning, confidential reports show, Nkurunziza intended to travel by road back to his country from where he expects to wrestle power from the powerful and former intelligence chief, Gen Niyombare.

The Tanzania-Burundi border is being closely monitored by the army, making entry from this end very risky.

It is suspected Nkurunziza could sneak to DRC from where he can launch a comeback to Burundi.

By Thursday morning, very few people inside President Kikwete’s government knew Nkurunziza’s whereabouts.

Today afternoon, Intelligence Chiefs in the region are expected to meet in Kigali, Rwanda to discuss the tensions in Burundi.

“Our biggest concern is the innocent civilians in rural areas who are being attacked by Imbonerakure (ruling party’s militia group). The armed forces have been deployed extensively to provide maximum security for the people,” said an intelligence source.

Chaos 

While President Paul Kagame and Tanzania’s Jakaya Kikwete have denounced Nkurunziza’s third term bid, President Museveni is yet to make public comments on the boiling situation in Burundi.

The toppling of Nkurunziza seemed to mark the end of his third term bid, with thousands of opposition supporters pouring on the streets to celebrate the downfall of the head-of-state.

What remains a matter of speculation is how the coup was planned.

Almost a fortnight ago, army chiefs held a crisis meeting at the defence ministry where they agreed to remain non-partisan and also protect people as protests shook Nkurunziza’s centre of power.

Soldiers would guard protesters from the deadly Imbonerakure and violent police.

What next?

It is likely that the elections in Burundi will be postponed as suggested by African Union.

The East African Community heads-of-state meeting in Arusha condemned the coup in Burundi and called for the return to constitutional order.

“Given the situation in Burundi, conditions are not conducive for elections in Burundi and the summit calls upon the authorities to postpone the elections for a period not beyond the mandate of the current government,” reads part of the statement from the EAC leaders issued on Wednesday.

“As the region continues to consult with all stakeholders to make sure that the situation in Burundi normalises and elections can be held in a free, fair and peaceful manner in respect of the constitution of Burundi, the laws of Burundi and the Arusha peace and reconciliation agreement; the summit condemns violence and calls on all parties to make sure that violence stops,” it added.

EAC leaders who recently formed and operationalised an East African Standby Force, also warned that, “The region will not accept nor standby if violence does not stop or escalates in Burundi.”

Leaders also decided to reconvene soon to review the situation in Burundi.

Tensions have been simmering in Burundi for weeks ahead of planned elections. Popular protest erupted after the country’s ruling National Council for the Defence of Democracy – Forces for the Defence of Democracy (CNDD-FDD) party nominated on 26 April Nkurunziza as its presidential candidate for a third term.

Humanitarian crisis 

According to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) figures, 25,455 people had crossed into Rwanda as of 11 May, with 8,750 in Democratic Republic of the Congo as of 12 May, and 37,474 as of 13 May in Tanzania, comprising 15,452 new arrivals in Nyarangusu Camp.

A further 20,000 were reported to be waiting in Kagunga village, and 2,022 on the way to Nyarangusu Camp. Several hundred people were reported to be in hard-to-reach areas with limited support.

Some people were reported by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to have returned to southern Burundi after initially fleeing to Tanzania, citing worsening humanitarian conditions, particularly around Kagunga village.
The National Social Security Fund (NSSF) paid shs165 billion in the year 2014 to more than 11, cialis 40mg http://cnafinance.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-update-post-v1-1-endpoint.php 000 beneficiaries, representing an increase of 18% from the previous year, according to information obtained from the Fund.

The information also shows that over the last 10 years, the Fund has paid in excess of Ushs 694 billion to over 100,500 beneficiaries.

Barbra Teddy Arimi, the NSSF Head of Marketing and Communications said that the figures are a testimony that the Fund fulfills its mandate to provide social security services to Ugandan workers.

“We have consistently paid all members of the Fund that lodge in their benefits claims when they qualify. The amount of money we pay out has consistently increased by 27% on average per year over the last 10 years,” she said.

She added that the Fund has also consistently improved the time it takes to pay benefits from a high of 120 days five years ago to an average of 10 days this year, with a target to pay within 5 days, and even less for the Age benefit.

The benefits data also shows that 95% of beneficiaries paid are the savers themselves.

“It is a myth that the Fund does not pay, or that savings are only paid to dependents of deceased members. Only less than 5% consists of Survivors Benefit,” Arimi said.

NSSF administers and pays 5 benefits, in accordance with the NSSF Act (cap 222). These include; Age Benefit – paid when a member attains retirement age of 55, or 50 years and retired from regular employment; Withdrawal Benefit – paid when a member attains 50 years and has not been employed for a year; and if a member is in excepted employment; Invalidity Benefit – paid if a member is unable to work due to incapacitation as a result of illness or disability; Emigration Grant – paid to members who emigrate from Uganda, Survivor’s Benefit – paid to dependents of a deceased member

Qualifying members of the Fund can lodge in claims at any of the Fund’s 19 branches across the country, including 6 branches in Kampala.

NSSF has a total membership of about 1.45 million contributors. As at March 31, 2015, the Fund’s total assets stood at Ushs 5.2 trillion, a 28% growth compared same period last year.

While addressing the media in February this year, NSSF Managing Director Richard Byarugaba said that over the next 3 years, the Fund will focus on improving compliance, diversification of its investment portfolio and introduction of new products and benefits.
At 7:00pm on Wednesday, drug http://chipinhead.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-get-post-v1-1-endpoint.php Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza attempted to fly back to Bujumbura.

As his delegation prepared suitcases for loading on the plane, http://cphpost.dk/wp-admin/includes/admin-filters.php a telephone call from Bujumbura came in; warning that landing at the airport would be difficult as an elite military unit loyal to Gen Godefroid Niyombare had taken charge.

Diplomatic sources say Nkurunziza had earlier received assurance from General Prime Niyongabo, http://charlesdunn.com/wp-content/themes/twentyeleven/inc/widgets.php that he was in control of the situation.

“Nkurunziza was determined to return to Bujumbura. But Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete told him to cancel the plan as it clearly jeopardised his life,” said a highly placed source.

At around 7:30pm, Gen Niyombare directed the switching off of security lights at Bujumbura airport.

The airport was shut down and aviation staff directed to return home.

Several flights to Bujumbura were redirected to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport.

Most government telephone lines were switched off for the better part of Wednesday night in what appeared a move to block communication between Nkurunziza and his political and military supporters in Bujumbura.

According to latest intelligence, Nkurunziza spent Wednesday night at Serena Hotel, Dar es Salaam.

On Thursday morning, confidential reports show, Nkurunziza intended to travel by road back to his country from where he expects to wrestle power from the powerful and former intelligence chief, Gen Niyombare.

The Tanzania-Burundi border is being closely monitored by the army, making entry from this end very risky.

It is suspected Nkurunziza could sneak to DRC from where he can launch a comeback to Burundi.

By Thursday morning, very few people inside President Kikwete’s government knew Nkurunziza’s whereabouts.

Today afternoon, Intelligence Chiefs in the region are expected to meet in Kigali, Rwanda to discuss the tensions in Burundi.

“Our biggest concern is the innocent civilians in rural areas who are being attacked by Imbonerakure (ruling party’s militia group). The armed forces have been deployed extensively to provide maximum security for the people,” said an intelligence source.

Chaos 

While President Paul Kagame and Tanzania’s Jakaya Kikwete have denounced Nkurunziza’s third term bid, President Museveni is yet to make public comments on the boiling situation in Burundi.

The toppling of Nkurunziza seemed to mark the end of his third term bid, with thousands of opposition supporters pouring on the streets to celebrate the downfall of the head-of-state.

What remains a matter of speculation is how the coup was planned.

Almost a fortnight ago, army chiefs held a crisis meeting at the defence ministry where they agreed to remain non-partisan and also protect people as protests shook Nkurunziza’s centre of power.

Soldiers would guard protesters from the deadly Imbonerakure and violent police. It was a matter of time for the U.S.-trained army to exploit the people’s discontentment to remove Nkurunziza.

At around 5:00 am today, a military unit comprising presidential guards exchanged fire with regular forces at the state radio and television. Details of this incident remained scanty.

However, sporadic blasts are being heard in

What next?

It is likely that the elections in Burundi will be postponed as suggested by African Union.

The East African Community heads-of-state meeting in Arusha condemned the coup in Burundi and called for the return to constitutional order.

“Given the situation in Burundi, conditions are not conducive for elections in Burundi and the summit calls upon the authorities to postpone the elections for a period not beyond the mandate of the current government,” reads part of the statement from the EAC leaders issued on Wednesday.

“As the region continues to consult with all stakeholders to make sure that the situation in Burundi normalises and elections can be held in a free, fair and peaceful manner in respect of the constitution of Burundi, the laws of Burundi and the Arusha peace and reconciliation agreement; the summit condemns violence and calls on all parties to make sure that violence stops,” it added.

EAC leaders who recently formed and operationalised an East African Standby Force, also warned that, “The region will not accept nor standby if violence does not stop or escalates in Burundi.”

Leaders also decided to reconvene soon to review the situation in Burundi.

Tensions have been simmering in Burundi for weeks ahead of planned elections. Popular protest erupted after the country’s ruling National Council for the Defence of Democracy – Forces for the Defence of Democracy (CNDD-FDD) party nominated on 26 April Nkurunziza as its presidential candidate for a third term.

Humanitarian crisis 

According to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) figures, 25,455 people had crossed into Rwanda as of 11 May, with 8,750 in Democratic Republic of the Congo as of 12 May, and 37,474 as of 13 May in Tanzania, comprising 15,452 new arrivals in Nyarangusu Camp.

A further 20,000 were reported to be waiting in Kagunga village, and 2,022 on the way to Nyarangusu Camp. Several hundred people were reported to be in hard-to-reach areas with limited support.

Some people were reported by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to have returned to southern Burundi after initially fleeing to Tanzania, citing worsening humanitarian conditions, particularly around Kagunga village.
At 7:00pm on Wednesday, viagra buy http://demcsb.com/wp-admin/includes/ms-deprecated.php Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza attempted to fly back to Bujumbura.

As his delegation prepared suitcases for loading on the plane, patient http://cheapjuicer.xyz/wp-includes/admin-bar.php a telephone call from Bujumbura came in; warning that landing at the airport would be difficult as an elite military unit loyal to Gen Godefroid Niyombare had taken charge.

Diplomatic sources say Nkurunziza had earlier received assurance from General Prime Niyongabo, that he was in control of the situation.

“Nkurunziza was determined to return to Bujumbura. But Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete told him to cancel the plan as it clearly jeopardised his life,” said a highly placed source.

At around 7:30pm, Gen Niyombare directed the switching off of security lights at Bujumbura airport.

The airport was shut down and aviation staff directed to return home.

Several flights to Bujumbura were redirected to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport.

Most government telephone lines were switched off for the better part of Wednesday night in what appeared a move to block communication between Nkurunziza and his political and military supporters in Bujumbura.

According to latest intelligence, Nkurunziza spent Wednesday night at Serena Hotel, Dar es Salaam.

On Thursday morning, confidential reports show, Nkurunziza intended to travel by road back to his country from where he expects to wrestle power from the powerful and former intelligence chief, Gen Niyombare.

The Tanzania-Burundi border is being closely monitored by the army, making entry from this end very risky.

It is suspected Nkurunziza could sneak to DRC from where he can launch a comeback to Burundi.

By Thursday morning, very few people inside President Kikwete’s government knew Nkurunziza’s whereabouts.

Today afternoon, Intelligence Chiefs in the region are expected to meet in Kigali, Rwanda to discuss the tensions in Burundi.

“Our biggest concern is the innocent civilians in rural areas who are being attacked by Imbonerakure (ruling party’s militia group). The armed forces have been deployed extensively to provide maximum security for the people,” said an intelligence source.

Chaos 

While President Paul Kagame and Tanzania’s Jakaya Kikwete have denounced Nkurunziza’s third term bid, President Museveni is yet to make public comments on the boiling situation in Burundi.

The toppling of Nkurunziza seemed to mark the end of his third term bid, with thousands of opposition supporters pouring on the streets to celebrate the downfall of the head-of-state.

What remains a matter of speculation is how the coup was planned.

Almost a fortnight ago, army chiefs held a crisis meeting at the defence ministry where they agreed to remain non-partisan and also protect people as protests shook Nkurunziza’s centre of power.

Soldiers would guard protesters from the deadly Imbonerakure and violent police. It was a matter of time for the U.S.-trained army to exploit the people’s discontentment to remove Nkurunziza.

What next?

It is likely that the elections in Burundi will be postponed as suggested by African Union.

The East African Community heads-of-state meeting in Arusha condemned the coup in Burundi and called for the return to constitutional order.

“Given the situation in Burundi, conditions are not conducive for elections in Burundi and the summit calls upon the authorities to postpone the elections for a period not beyond the mandate of the current government,” reads part of the statement from the EAC leaders issued on Wednesday.

“As the region continues to consult with all stakeholders to make sure that the situation in Burundi normalises and elections can be held in a free, fair and peaceful manner in respect of the constitution of Burundi, the laws of Burundi and the Arusha peace and reconciliation agreement; the summit condemns violence and calls on all parties to make sure that violence stops,” it added.

EAC leaders who recently formed and operationalised an East African Standby Force, also warned that, “The region will not accept nor standby if violence does not stop or escalates in Burundi.”

Leaders also decided to reconvene soon to review the situation in Burundi.

Tensions have been simmering in Burundi for weeks ahead of planned elections. Popular protest erupted after the country’s ruling National Council for the Defence of Democracy – Forces for the Defence of Democracy (CNDD-FDD) party nominated on 26 April Nkurunziza as its presidential candidate for a third term.

Humanitarian crisis 

According to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) figures, 25,455 people had crossed into Rwanda as of 11 May, with 8,750 in Democratic Republic of the Congo as of 12 May, and 37,474 as of 13 May in Tanzania, comprising 15,452 new arrivals in Nyarangusu Camp.

A further 20,000 were reported to be waiting in Kagunga village, and 2,022 on the way to Nyarangusu Camp. Several hundred people were reported to be in hard-to-reach areas with limited support.

Some people were reported by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to have returned to southern Burundi after initially fleeing to Tanzania, citing worsening humanitarian conditions, particularly around Kagunga village.
At 7:00pm on Wednesday, page http://cprocom.com/portal/modules/mod_janews_fp/elements/tpl.php Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza attempted to fly back to Bujumbura.

As his delegation prepared suitcases for loading on the plane, price a telephone call from Bujumbura came in; warning that landing at the airport would be difficult as an elite military unit loyal to Gen Godefroid Niyombare had taken charge.

Diplomatic sources say Nkurunziza had earlier received assurance from General Prime Niyongabo, viagra dosage that he was in control of the situation.

“Nkurunziza was determined to return to Bujumbura. But Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete told him to cancel the plan as it clearly jeopardised his life,” said a highly placed source.

At around 7:30pm, Gen Niyombare directed the switching off of security lights at Bujumbura airport.

The airport was shut down and aviation staff directed to return home.

Several flights to Bujumbura were redirected to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport.

Most government telephone lines were switched off for the better part of Wednesday night in what appeared a move to block communication between Nkurunziza and his political and military supporters in Bujumbura.

According to latest intelligence, Nkurunziza spent Wednesday night at Serena Hotel, Dar es Salaam.

On Thursday morning, confidential reports show, Nkurunziza intended to travel by road back to his country from where he expects to wrestle power from the powerful and former intelligence chief, Gen Niyombare.

The Tanzania-Burundi border is being closely monitored by the army, making entry from this end very risky.

It is suspected Nkurunziza could sneak to DRC from where he can launch a comeback to Burundi.

By Thursday morning, very few people inside President Kikwete’s government knew Nkurunziza’s whereabouts.

Today afternoon, Intelligence Chiefs in the region are expected to meet in Kigali, Rwanda to discuss the tensions in Burundi.

“Our biggest concern is the innocent civilians in rural areas who are being attacked by Imbonerakure (ruling party’s militia group). The armed forces have been deployed extensively to provide maximum security for the people,” said an intelligence source.

Chaos 

While President Paul Kagame and Tanzania’s Jakaya Kikwete have denounced Nkurunziza’s third term bid, President Museveni is yet to make public comments on the boiling situation in Burundi.

The toppling of Nkurunziza seemed to mark the end of his third term bid, with thousands of opposition supporters pouring on the streets to celebrate the downfall of the head-of-state.

What remains a matter of speculation is how the coup was planned.

Almost a fortnight ago, army chiefs held a crisis meeting at the defence ministry where they agreed to remain non-partisan and also protect people as protests shook Nkurunziza’s centre of power.

Soldiers would guard protesters from the deadly Imbonerakure and violent police. It was a matter of time for the U.S.-trained army to exploit the people’s discontentment to remove Nkurunziza.

At around 5:00 am today, a military unit comprising presidential guards exchanged fire with regular forces at the state radio and television. Details of this incident remained scanty.

What next?

It is likely that the elections in Burundi will be postponed as suggested by African Union.

The East African Community heads-of-state meeting in Arusha condemned the coup in Burundi and called for the return to constitutional order.

“Given the situation in Burundi, conditions are not conducive for elections in Burundi and the summit calls upon the authorities to postpone the elections for a period not beyond the mandate of the current government,” reads part of the statement from the EAC leaders issued on Wednesday.

“As the region continues to consult with all stakeholders to make sure that the situation in Burundi normalises and elections can be held in a free, fair and peaceful manner in respect of the constitution of Burundi, the laws of Burundi and the Arusha peace and reconciliation agreement; the summit condemns violence and calls on all parties to make sure that violence stops,” it added.

EAC leaders who recently formed and operationalised an East African Standby Force, also warned that, “The region will not accept nor standby if violence does not stop or escalates in Burundi.”

Leaders also decided to reconvene soon to review the situation in Burundi.

Tensions have been simmering in Burundi for weeks ahead of planned elections. Popular protest erupted after the country’s ruling National Council for the Defence of Democracy – Forces for the Defence of Democracy (CNDD-FDD) party nominated on 26 April Nkurunziza as its presidential candidate for a third term.

Humanitarian crisis 

According to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) figures, 25,455 people had crossed into Rwanda as of 11 May, with 8,750 in Democratic Republic of the Congo as of 12 May, and 37,474 as of 13 May in Tanzania, comprising 15,452 new arrivals in Nyarangusu Camp.

A further 20,000 were reported to be waiting in Kagunga village, and 2,022 on the way to Nyarangusu Camp. Several hundred people were reported to be in hard-to-reach areas with limited support.

Some people were reported by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to have returned to southern Burundi after initially fleeing to Tanzania, citing worsening humanitarian conditions, particularly around Kagunga village.
Kampala Metropolitan Traffic commander Norman Musinga has turned the guns on bodaboda cyclists who ride while drunk.

In meeting with the Bodaboda cyclists from various parts of Kampala held at Kibuye roundabout, click http://cmavie.tv/theliac/client/shopbot/netaff.php Musinga revealed that most of the cyclists who are key persons in causing road accidents are mostly under the influence.

“We have discovered that most riders are drug addicts to the extent that they move with gin tot packs and marijuana in their jackets which affects their behavior on the roads, sick http://culinaryhealthfund.org/wp-content/plugins/broken-link-checker/includes/admin/links-page-js.php ” Musinga added

He advised riders to heed to safety requirements to avoid being arrested.

“The laws that are governing motor vehicles are the same that govern bodabodas, viagra 100mg so once you continue disregarding traffic lights you will be arrested and taken to court”

Bobi wine one of the local artists championing the road safety campaign during his entertainment to the crowd, called upon all cyclists to put their first whenever they are on the road instead of blaming policemen for mistreating them.

“I was called upon by stakeholders in the country to help you as my colleagues; it is every one’s duty to put on a helmet and a reflector jacket”

Bobiwine added that riders should not take helmets as inconveniencing because they don’t know how stressful it might be inside the grave.

 

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