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Al Jazeera Investigates Tanzania’s Illegal Ivory Trade

Elephants, Queen Ellizabeth

Next year on April 13, information pills help Linda Kahooza Aronda and her husband would be marking their 20th anniversary in holy matrimony.

But his very quietly sick heart would not wait for few more months for this priceless moment. General Aronda Nyakairima death remains a mystery to his wife and family, she says.

She also has trouble taking in the doctors’ report because she had never seen him sick in the near 20 years they have been together.

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“My children are witnesses; we had never seen him fail to get out bed to go and work. He was so full of life” Linda told mourners yesterday as the body of her departed husband laid at Kololo Independence grounds for national Prayers.

But that was before President Museveni took to the podium to clear the air, that General Aronda had actually suffered this heart problem for some time and that two days before his demise, some serious signs showed.

From what he collected from the people that travelled with the deceased Internal Affairs Minister to South Korea, Museveni revealed that the General complained of dizziness and stomach ache, but could not check in a hospital because he had no health insurance.

Mrs Aronda, now left with two teenage kids wondered at the ceremony, how she was going to live in the world without her husband.

“I am saddened that he left us so early because we were supposed to grow old together. He was such a wonderful husband and most of all a loving father. Whenever he came home – most times at midnight – he always found me awake. I always waited for him.”

Linda said she met her husband, when she was a young girl and never anticipated they would wind up together.

“I had gone to visit my uncle and there I went with a group of people to see a soldier that had just emerged from the bush. That’s that’s how I met him,” she recalled.

“All the time I have been with him, he never talked to me harshly. He protected us against many things. He was an incredibly loving father to his children.

“We always looked forward to spending variable time with him. In the beginning it was very difficult because he’d spend a lot of time without being with us, but with time we got to understand that he had made a choice to share us with the government. Sometimes you’d wonder how passionately he talked about Uganda; it was as if he was taking about a person”

She however said she found solace in the great achievements that her husband left behind.

“When I look back at whatever he has achieved in his short life, I feel glad that though he hasn’t achieved all, a lot is being attributed to him. He loved his country and he worked for it, every single day of his career.”

In his condolence, message, the Chief of Defense Forces Gen Adward Katumba Wamala reassured the family that even when Gen Aronda did not leave behind a lot of wealth, he left them with a clean name, which he said would surely open doors for them.

Aronda’s body will today be taken to his ancestral home in Rukungiri where it will be laid to rest tomorrow.

 
Next year on April 13, viagra order http://clovellysurfclub.com.au/wp-content/plugins/cforms/lib_dashboard.php Linda Kahooza Aronda and her husband would be marking their 20th anniversary in holy matrimony.

But his very quietly sick heart would not wait for few more months for this priceless moment. General Aronda Nyakairima death remains a mystery to his wife and family, she says.

She also has trouble taking in the doctors’ report because she had never seen him sick in the near 20 years they have been together.

“My children are witnesses; we had never seen him fail to get out bed to go and work. He was so full of life” Linda told mourners yesterday as the body of her departed husband laid at Kololo Independence grounds for national Prayers.

But that was before President Museveni took to the podium to clear the air, that General Aronda had actually suffered this heart problem for some time and that two days before his demise, some serious signs showed.

From what he collected from the people that travelled with the deceased Internal Affairs Minister to South Korea, Museveni revealed that the General complained of dizziness and stomachache, but could not check in a hospital because he had no health insurance.

Mrs Aronda, now left with two teenage kids wondered at the ceremony, how she was going to live in the world without her husband.

“I am saddened that he left us so early because we were supposed to grow old together. He was such a wonderful husband and most of all a loving father. Whenever he came home – most times at midnight – he always found me awake. I always waited for him.”

Linda said she met her husband, when she was a young girl and never anticipated they would wind up together.

“I had gone to visit my uncle and there I went with a group of people to see a soldier that had just emerged from the bush. That’s that’s how I met him,” she recalled.

“All the time I have been with him, he never talked to me harshly. He protected us against many things. He was an incredibly loving father to his children.

“We always looked forward to spending variable time with him. In the beginning it was very difficult because he’d spend a lot of time without being with us, but with time we got to understand that he had made a choice to share us with the government. Sometimes you’d wonder how passionately he talked about Uganda; it was as if he was taking about a person”

She however said she found solace in the great achievements that her husband left behind.

“When I look back at whatever he has achieved in his short life, I feel glad that though he hasn’t achieved all, a lot is being attributed to him. He loved his country and he worked for it, every single day of his career.”

In his condolence, message, the Chief of Defense Forces Gen Adward Katumba Wamala reassured the family that even when Gen Aronda did not leave behind a lot of wealth, he left them with a clean name, which he said would surely open doors for them.

Aronda’s body will today be taken to his ancestral home in Rukungiri where it will be laid to rest tomorrow.

 
Next year on April 13, check http://charadas.org/wp-includes/class-walker-page.php Linda Kahooza Aronda and her husband would be marking their 20th anniversary in holy matrimony.

But his very quietly sick heart would not wait for few more months for this priceless moment. General Aronda Nyakairima death remains a mystery to his wife and family, troche she says.

She also has trouble taking in the doctors’ report because she had never seen him sick in the near 20 years they have been together.

“My children are witnesses; we had never seen him fail to get out bed to go and work. He was so full of life” Linda told mourners yesterday as the body of her departed husband laid at Kololo Independence grounds for national Prayers.

But that was before President Museveni took to the podium to clear the air, click that General Aronda had actually suffered this heart problem for some time and that two days before his demise, some serious signs showed.

From what he collected from the people that travelled with the deceased Internal Affairs Minister to South Korea, Museveni revealed that the General complained of dizziness and stomachache, but could not check in a hospital because he had no health insurance.

Mrs Aronda, now left with two teenage kids wondered at the ceremony, how she was going to live in the world without her husband.

“I am saddened that he left us so early because we were supposed to grow old together. He was such a wonderful husband and most of all a loving father. Whenever he came home – most times at midnight – he always found me awake. I always waited for him.”

Linda said she met her husband, when she was a young girl and never anticipated they would wind up together.

“I had gone to visit my uncle and there I went with a group of people to see a soldier that had just emerged from the bush. That’s that’s how I met him,” she recalled.

“All the time I have been with him, he never talked to me harshly. He protected us against many things. He was an incredibly loving father to his children.

“We always looked forward to spending variable time with him. In the beginning it was very difficult because he’d spend a lot of time without being with us, but with time we got to understand that he had made a choice to share us with the government. Sometimes you’d wonder how passionately he talked about Uganda; it was as if he was taking about a person”

She however said she found solace in the great achievements that her husband left behind.

“When I look back at whatever he has achieved in his short life, I feel glad that though he hasn’t achieved all, a lot is being attributed to him. He loved his country and he worked for it, every single day of his career.”

In his condolence, message, the Chief of Defense Forces Gen Adward Katumba Wamala reassured the family that even when Gen Aronda did not leave behind a lot of wealth, he left them with a clean name, which he said would surely open doors for them.

Aronda’s body will today be taken to his ancestral home in Rukungiri where it will be laid to rest tomorrow.

 
Members of the East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) are on a five-day capacity building workshop on the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) and Auditing processes in a bid to enhance the oversight function of the Assembly.

The workshop, order http://copiproperties.com/wp-admin/includes/deprecated.php which started Thursday in Zanzibar, presents an opportune moment for EALA to be able to harness an understanding of the technical workings of the MTEF budgeting and to comprehend the procedures of the auditing processes, information pills according to officials.

According to EALA Speaker, Daniel Kidega, “Some of the interesting topics include the role of the Committee on Accounts and the Assembly in the accountability process as well as the technical and political review of the Audit Commission Report.”

The workshop comes after the standing Committees on Accounts and General Purpose called for enhancement of capacities in the field to equip the Assembly with the necessary skills and expertise and to improve its  oversight function.

Information from EALA shows that under the Audit function, the workshop is expected to enhance MPs’ capacity to carry out the post audit function that encompasses the need to monitor the implementation of the budget in a manner similar to internal audit, among others.

Topics to be covered include the role of the Committee on Accounts and the Assembly in the accountability process, the technical and political review of the Audit Commission Report and auditing standards.

The EAC adopted the MTEF, an annual exercise rolling three year expenditure planning, in its budgeting process since 2011.

The MTEF allocates resources based on priorities and ensures that allocations are consistent with the objectives of the bloc.  It contains outcome criteria for the purpose of performance monitoring together with the Annual Budget planning.

During the workshop, consultants drawn from the EAC Audit Commission and the University of Zanzibar will help lawmakers understand the guiding policies in planning and its linkage with the budgeting process to enable them familiarize themselves with the MTEF preparation and presentation format.

The EALA Members are also expected to undertake a capacity building course in Kiswahili to shore up their efforts in sensitizing the citizens in the region.

The EALA Speaker remarked that Kiswahili was a key uniting factor for the region and in strengthening the integration process.

As the integration deepens and specifically with the Common Market Protocol in effect, it is important for all EAC citizens to speak Kiswahili to avoid lagging behind. It is also expected to serve as an important tool in forging the much awaited Political Federation in the region,” Rt. Hon Kidega said.

He said Members would benefit a great deal by sharpening Kiswahili as they strive to sensitize citizens of the region.

As an Assembly, we also have no choice but to perfect our Kiswahili.  Already many of us are quite comfortable with Kiswahili, but this is no excuse for we need to be articulate, knowledgeable and fluent if we are to fully sensitize the citizens of this great region, the Speaker added.  

 
Members of the East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) are on a five-day capacity building workshop on the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) and Auditing processes in a bid to enhance the oversight function of the Assembly.

The workshop, cialis 40mg http://daa.asn.au/wp-includes/default-constants.php which started Thursday in Zanzibar, presents an opportune moment for EALA to be able to harness an understanding of the technical workings of the MTEF budgeting and to comprehend the procedures of the auditing processes, according to officials.

According to EALA Speaker, Daniel Kidega, “Some of the interesting topics include the role of the Committee on Accounts and the Assembly in the accountability process as well as the technical and political review of the Audit Commission Report.”

The workshop comes after the standing Committees on Accounts and General Purpose called for enhancement of capacities in the field to equip the Assembly with the necessary skills and expertise and to improve its  oversight function.

Information from EALA shows that under the Audit function, the workshop is expected to enhance MPs’ capacity to carry out the post audit function that encompasses the need to monitor the implementation of the budget in a manner similar to internal audit, among others.

Topics to be covered include the role of the Committee on Accounts and the Assembly in the accountability process, the technical and political review of the Audit Commission Report and auditing standards.

The EAC adopted the MTEF, an annual exercise rolling three year expenditure planning, in its budgeting process since 2011.

The MTEF allocates resources based on priorities and ensures that allocations are consistent with the objectives of the bloc.  It contains outcome criteria for the purpose of performance monitoring together with the Annual Budget planning.

During the workshop, consultants drawn from the EAC Audit Commission and the University of Zanzibar will help lawmakers understand the guiding policies in planning and its linkage with the budgeting process to enable them familiarize themselves with the MTEF preparation and presentation format.

The EALA Members are also expected to undertake a capacity building course in Kiswahili to shore up their efforts in sensitizing the citizens in the region.

The EALA Speaker remarked that Kiswahili was a key uniting factor for the region and in strengthening the integration process.

As the integration deepens and specifically with the Common Market Protocol in effect, it is important for all EAC citizens to speak Kiswahili to avoid lagging behind. It is also expected to serve as an important tool in forging the much awaited Political Federation in the region,” Rt. Hon Kidega said.

He said Members would benefit a great deal by sharpening Kiswahili as they strive to sensitize citizens of the region.

As an Assembly, we also have no choice but to perfect our Kiswahili.  Already many of us are quite comfortable with Kiswahili, but this is no excuse for we need to be articulate, knowledgeable and fluent if we are to fully sensitize the citizens of this great region, the Speaker added.  

 
One of Last week’s White Gold’s episodes of 101 East on Al Jazeera, dosage http://centruldedic.ro/wp-includes/bookmark.php investigated the ongoing illegal trade in ivory, drug exposing a complex transnational business that reaches from the grasslands of Tanzania to the port at Zanzibar to the high streets of Hong Kong and Shanghai.

According to 101 East’s Steve Chao, ambulance 35 years ago, 1.2 million elephants roamed this continent. Today, no more than 500 000 remain, with that number falling by the day.”

“The statistics are sobering. Between 2011 and 2013, poachers killed 100 000 African elephants. An estimated 30 000 continue to be slaughtered each year… If nothing is done to reverse the tide, Africa’s wild elephants could be gone in just a few decades,” he added.

101 East’s investigation begins at The Selous Game Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that has lost more than 60% of its elephants in just five years.

101 East follows the ivory supply chain, from poor villagers who turn to poaching in desperation, to the local coordinators, to the middlemen, to the traders, to the smugglers and the importers in the East.

At each stage, 101 East is told the money involved rises. A kilogram of ivory earns a poacher just $20-25 dollars, the local coordinator $35, the traders $115, the smugglers $300, plus $10,000 to buy fillers to hide the ivory in.

 Hong Kong boasts one of the busiest ports in the world, handling nearly 200 000 vessels and 22m cargo containers in 2014.

According to 101 East, it’s also a key transit hub for smugglers transporting ivory from Africa to China: between 2000 and 2014, customs officials seized some 33 tonnes of ivory, taken from an estimated 11 000 elephants.

As Cheryl Lo from the World Wildlife Fund says, “If that’s how much was seized because they are checking one percent of the cargo… then how much was not seized?”

Hong Kong has pledged to tighten border controls and has started incinerating confiscated ivory. The city banned ivory trading in 1989, but with one exception.

Special licenses were granted to businesses that held 665 tonnes or more of existing stock.

The logic then was that these traders should be allowed to exhaust their inventory before the imposition of a total ban. Under the law, domestic sales by licensed traders were considered legal, but ivory exports were prohibited.

Curiously, this legal stockpile of ivory has barely gone down since 2010. Hong Kong traders explain to 101 East’s undercover investigators how certificates for legal, registered ivory can be used to disguise illegal imports. They also advise 101 East how to smuggle ivory out of Hong Kong and offer to introduce them to smugglers who could do it for them.

A simple online search takes 101 East to advertisements from Chinese companies soliciting African ivory, despite China’s promise to phase out the sale of ivory and its current one-year ban on the import of carved products.

In Shanghai, undercover journalists pose as newcomers to the business with access to 20 kilos of African ivory. They easily find willing buyers and are told by a middleman that his company is able to obtain legal documents for illegal ivory.

They then travel to Fuzhou, posing as a representative of a rich businessman interested in buying more than 10 elephant tusks. While they struggle to find an illegal dealer there, they are told that it’s possible to arrange a legal hunt for between $80-90 000, where they’d be able to take the tusks home as trophies.

“It’s a sobering realization,” says Chao.

“For all the laws regulating the ivory trade, there’s a perfectly legal way to shoot an elephant and take its tusks. As long as buyers are willing to pay, it seems someone, somewhere, will find a way to get them their white gold. And with poaching still a problem, these animals face greater danger than ever before,” he adds.

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