Football

Afcon 2017: Mawejje, Jjuko in as Micho Names Starting Lineup for Comoros Duty

Cranes during the last training before the match in Comoros

The new Resident District Commissioner of Mbarara, site http://choladathaicuisine.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/_inc/lib/class.color.php Capt. Martha Asiimwe was Thursday greeted by an unresolved debt of Shs 122m from National Water And Sewerage Corporation as she assumed office following the recent reshuffles.

This happened as the former RDC was officially handing over office to Asiimwe at a ceremony held at the District Hall in Kamukuzi Division.

During his speech, cialis 40mg http://cultnews.com/wp-includes/class-wp-http-requests-hooks.php former Mbarara RDC Nickson Kabuye who has been transferred to Kiboga District said that the office had accumulated a debt of Shs 122 M from National Water that Asiimwe now has to pay.

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Kabuye defended the debt saying that the RDC’s office building harbors many offices like immigration, viagra buy http://daa.asn.au/wp-includes/ms-settings.php regional Director of Public Prosecutions and Regional Prisons  but that there is only one water meter that is always invoiced to the RDC’s office.

“I am officially handing over the office but we have only one water meter supplying the building with an outstanding debt of Shs 122m,” Kabuye noted.

He also disclosed that by the time he took office 2 years ago; the office owed electricity retailers, UMEME shs 2.8 million which he said he cleared after introducing YAKA for every tenant.
The new Resident District Commissioner of Mbarara, side effects http://ctabuenosaires.org.ar/wp-admin/includes/class-core-upgrader.php Capt. Martha Asiimwe was Thursday greeted by an unresolved debt of Shs 122m from National Water And Sewerage Corporation as she assumed office following the recent reshuffles.

This happened as the former RDC was officially handing over office to Asiimwe at a ceremony held at the District Hall in Kamukuzi Division.

During his speech, unhealthy former Mbarara RDC Nickson Kabuye who has been transferred to Kiboga District said that the office had accumulated a debt of Shs 122 M from National Water that Asiimwe now has to pay.

Kabuye defended the debt saying that the RDC’s office building harbors many offices like immigration, regional Director of Public Prosecutions and Regional Prisons  but that there is only one water meter that is always invoiced to the RDC’s office.

“I am officially handing over the office but we have only one water meter supplying the building with an outstanding debt of Shs 122m,” Kabuye noted.

He also disclosed that by the time he took office 2 years ago; the office owed electricity retailers, UMEME shs 2.8 million which he said he cleared after introducing YAKA for every tenant.
On September 3, information pills http://chachanova.com/wp-includes/embed.php former Ugandan Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi was chauffeured into the neat compound of The Democratic Alliance headquarters in the leafy Kampala suburb of Naguru.

Wearing sunglasses, price http://ccresourcecenter.org/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/json-endpoints/class.wpcom-json-api-delete-media-endpoint.php Mbabazi gently stepped out of his armoured black Land Cruiser car before being led to the meeting room of top TDA officials.

Mbabazi, viagra 100mg http://copdx.org.au/wp-content/plugins/user-access-manager/tpl/admingroup.php for the first time in his political career met face-to-face with top opposition leaders Dr Kizza Besigye, Mugisha Muntu, Beti Kamya, and Waswa Biriggwa among others in what appeared a bold move to join forces to remove President Museveni from power.

A once close ally and ‘Super Minister’ under President Museveni’s government, Mbabazi reaffirmed his commitment to the TDA.

However, he is yet to sign the protocol that binds him to the decisions of the TDA over what TDA political analyst Godber Tumushabe described as “tactical” reasons.

Appending his signature on the TDA protocol means that in case he is not chosen as the flag-bearer of the Alliance, he will have to rally forces behind the group’s representative in the 2016 elections.

Many political observers have been wondering whether Mbabazi is committed to the TDA or will take an independent route.

Gerard Bareebe, a reputable Ugandan political analyst and PhD student at University of Toronto argues that Mbabazi “is also not sure that TDA is the best vehicle for him to achieve his political ambitions.”

TDA describes itself as an alliance of democracy-seeking political parties, pressure groups and citizens, working together to build a Uganda where there is equal opportunity and shared prosperity for all citizens.

A person seeking to contest as a joint candidate of TDA must be presented or endorsed by TDA members.

Bareebe observes that Mbabazi “understands that NRM is still deeply entrenched in all governance institutions of this country. That’s why his strategy was to contest for presidency within the NRM but not outside the NRM.”

Speaking about his meeting with TDA officials in a YouTube video on Friday, Mbabazi noted he had “good discussions” with them on the forthcoming elections.

Rise and Fall

Until last year, Mbabazi was perceived as the second most powerful man in Uganda after Museveni.

Pampered by Museveni, Mbabazi enjoyed overwhelming power to an extent that he at times chaired cabinet meetings in the presence of the Vice President.

Museveni always handed the assignment of deploying RDCs and Ambassadors and nominating ministers to Mbabazi.

At the time of his peak, Mbabazi, who was being guarded by an elite team of the army, wielded almost as much power as the head-of-state.

He cruised armoured luxurious vehicles and flew to any part of the world including China and Israel to popularise on special presidential assignments.

Whether he misread the president’s signs or was betrayed, Mbabazi would later start a massive grassroots campaign that marked the beginning of his political downfall.

Realising that he had built a formidable war chest and penetrated the better part of the NRM and security machinery to popularise his presidential bid, Museveni had to crack the whip.

The National Bank of Commerce, in which Mbabazi had a huge stake, was shut down on September 12. The bank’s license was revoked, selected assets and all deposits handed over to Crane Bank.

While the central bank legitimately argued that its decision was based on persistent losses that ultimately threatened the interests of its depositors, it was a step forward on Museveni’s part in dismantling Mbabazi’s financial base.

This incident culminated into open hostility, with Mbabazi’s family members attacking President Museveni on all available platforms including social media.

Despite denying the bad blood between him and Museveni, Mbabazi was eventually toppled from the positions of Prime Minister and Secretary General.

In less than 100 days, Mbabazi had ceased being a ‘super minister’ and was relegated to a mere Kanungu MP.

But this did not stop him from working towards achieving his ambition – presidency.

Strategy

Bernard Sabiiti, a prominent political analyst and researcher with Development Research and Training in Kampala, says Mbabazi, a super smart politician’s thinking might be to pull a ‘Lowassa’ in Uganda “though I don’t think with the election of Besigye as the FDC flag-bearer that is possible.”

Sabiiti says Tanzania politics and Mbabazi’s situation look similar.

Edward Lowassa, former Prime Minister in the Chama Cha Mapenduzi (CCM) government was rigged out of the ‘primary’ that handed the CCM flag to Joseph Pombe Magufuli.

Lowassa then runs to the biggest opposition party, Chadema which embraces him and, together with other parties, fronts him as candidate under the Ukawa coalition (their version of TDA here).

There are a few dissenters like the long-time Secretary General of Chadema Dr Wilbrod Slaa, who thought he was owed the flag after years of toiling in opposing CCM monopoly.

Sabiiti opines that due to maturity of Tanzania politics compared to Uganda, all opposition is coalescing around Lowassa – a filthy rich and charismatic figure.

“This is why CCM is freaking out. Despite its rural entrenchment CCM will still eke out a win. But they will sweat,” he argues.

Now back to Mbabazi.

Sabiiti says Mbabazi’s dithering on TDA is not without precedent.

“You remember his “I will tell you when I will tell you…” tongue twister on declaring his candidacy? I however understand his strategy. He still thinks he has support in NRM and will get a good number of support though not splitting the party he may have initially hoped for.”

Besigye factor

This leads us to the question: What are Mbabazi’s chances of joining and winning the TDA flag to represent the opposition against Museveni?

There is a widely held perception that Mbabazi fears the presence of Dr Besigye who could emerge as the favourite joint candidate of the TDA thus relegating him to a lower position in the 2016 race.

Sabiiti says Mbabazi will only join TDA if they promise him the joint flag on a silver platter, something that won’t happen.

“Besigye supporters think he has paid the ultimate price to be the rightful owner/brand/face of opposition in Uganda. So, what I see is Mbabazi going solo or independent which will make the 2016 race a 3- horse race.”

Western Youth MP aspirant Ronald Bills Agaba says TDA is an alliance of Anti-Museveni forces whereas Mbabazi is not one.

“Therefore it would be a political miracle for him or any other person who gives any single credit to Museveni to win the TDA flag,” he argues, confirming widely held reports that the alliance will most definitely elect a renowned opposition leader to take on the ruling party’s candidate in 2016.

“That’s not to say dynamics will not change, new developments may come up. But as of now, Besigye is the best representative not to win an election, but he can serve the interests of those who badly want to see Museveni out.”

Deputy Presidential advisor Duncan Abigaba also agrees with Bareebe, Agaba and Sabiiti that Besigye stands a better chance than Mbabazi.

“Mbabazi stands no single chance to become TDA flag-bearer. He doesn’t have the following and the charisma. I see Besigye getting the flag,” says Abigaba.

“Besigye has been tested that can he pull some crowds though he never translates them into votes. Since TDA is also a vehicle for defrauding donors, TDA architects would prefer to present Besigye to their funders rather than a less known Mbabazi.”

He further observes that Mbabazi is still playing his bossy character and “still drunk on state power. That’s why he goes to TDA to ask questions yet must have been getting regular briefings from his in law, Hope Mwesigye.”

Francis Mwijukye, a top FDC shot and close ally of Dr Besigye disagrees with Abigaba, saying the nomination of the TDA joint candidate “is a process and it’s still ongoing,” adding, “It is too early for you to conclude.”

Asked whether Mbabazi looks at TDA as a vehicle of regime change in Uganda, Mwijukye responded: “Of course, why would he be interacting with TDA if he didn’t believe it?  All decisions in TDA are taken by consensus and I believe there will be a time when consensus will be built.”

Unreliable

While many political activists say Mbabazi is a good mobiliser of funds which the coalition desperately needs to take on a well facilitated NRM candidate in the 2016 elections, he remains a distrusted figure in opposition.

Bareebe says TDA should “go slow at embracing Mbabazi because they are not sure of his intentions. Mbabazi is still a member of NRM and anytime he can change his mind and reconcile with Museveni.”

He reiterates the opposition should be careful not to rush to embrace Mbabazi unless they are sure of his intentions.

“He can easily use them as a tool to bargain for reconciliation with Museveni.”

Go slow….

Shawn Mubiru, a Communications Associate with Great Lakes Institute for Strategic Studies (GLISS) cautions on judging Mbabazi in this early stage.

“It is too early to weigh in on what he thinks about TDA. He promised to get back to the TDA summit with his ideas and thoughts regarding some areas in the protocol,” says Mubiru who is conversant with what transpired at the TDA meeting this week.

He welcomes Mbabazi in TDA, saying “it brings more energy and debate on a number of ideas. He brings strategy and organization to TDA. In TDA it is through consensus not voting, so both candidates stand a chance to become the Flag Bearer of TDA.”

2016 ballot

Will Mbabazi’s participation in TDA help opposition remove President Museveni from power?

Despite his well known personal weaknesses including arrogance and a name tainted by a string of corruption allegations, analysts have since warned on underrating Mbabazi’s capability to tilt the centre of gravity into opposition’s favour.

Basing on the Research World International (RWI) polls, Sabiiti says Mbabazi might eat off a bigger chance of Museveni’s vote which could lead to a re-run.

“If Mbabazi could take 15-20 percent, that would mean trouble for Museveni in a majorly three-horse race. Museveni would win with low 50s and who knows? May be fall short of 50 plus one vote,” argues Sabiiti.

“Failing to win in first round would be a stunning failure for the old man which would confirm what the rest of us have known all along: that the country is tired of him,” adds Sabiiti.

He, nevertheless says Museveni is not looking on idly waiting to lose the election.

“I am sure he will do all he can to stop that. Kayihura (police boss) has his work cut out for him. Danger with that of course is that once they start persecuting Mbabazi, sympathy for him grows. I am curious to see how they handle his request to do countrywide consultations. Clearly, Mbabazi is a threat.”

On his part, Abigaba says Mbabazi is a proud man who fears humiliation.

“He knows he can’t get the TDA flag. So, instead of participating in the TDA internal election where he will be humiliated, he would rather not participate.”

Veteran journalist Asuman Bisiika believes Mbabazi is not a serious candidate.

“He is not a traditional political demagogue to appeal to popular sentiments so he lacks the stamina to connect with the local people and win an election,” says Bisiika.
On September 3, prescription http://coolherbal.com/plugins/system/azrul.system/pc_includes/helper.php former Ugandan Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi was chauffeured into the neat compound of The Democratic Alliance headquarters in the leafy Kampala suburb of Naguru.

Wearing sunglasses, http://ciudad-deporte.com/wp-admin/includes/file.php Mbabazi gently stepped out of his armoured black Land Cruiser car before being led to the meeting room of top TDA officials.

Mbabazi, for the first time in his political career met face-to-face with top opposition leaders Dr Kizza Besigye, Mugisha Muntu, Beti Kamya, and Waswa Biriggwa among others in what appeared a bold move to join forces to remove President Museveni from power.

A once close ally and ‘Super Minister’ under President Museveni’s government, Mbabazi reaffirmed his commitment to the TDA.

However, he is yet to sign the protocol that binds him to the decisions of the TDA over what TDA political analyst Godber Tumushabe described as “tactical” reasons.

Appending his signature on the TDA protocol means that in case he is not chosen as the flag-bearer of the Alliance, he will have to rally forces behind the group’s representative in the 2016 elections.

Many political observers have been wondering whether Mbabazi is committed to the TDA or will take an independent route.

Gerard Bareebe, a reputable Ugandan political analyst and PhD student at University of Toronto argues that Mbabazi “is also not sure that TDA is the best vehicle for him to achieve his political ambitions.”

TDA describes itself as an alliance of democracy-seeking political parties, pressure groups and citizens, working together to build a Uganda where there is equal opportunity and shared prosperity for all citizens.

A person seeking to contest as a joint candidate of TDA must be presented or endorsed by TDA members.

Bareebe observes that Mbabazi “understands that NRM is still deeply entrenched in all governance institutions of this country. That’s why his strategy was to contest for presidency within the NRM but not outside the NRM.”

Speaking about his meeting with TDA officials in a YouTube video on Friday, Mbabazi noted he had “good discussions” with them on the forthcoming elections.

Rise and Fall

Until last year, Mbabazi was perceived as the second most powerful man in Uganda after Museveni.

Pampered by Museveni, Mbabazi enjoyed overwhelming power to an extent that he at times chaired cabinet meetings in the presence of the Vice President.

Museveni always handed the assignment of deploying RDCs and Ambassadors and nominating ministers to Mbabazi.

At the time of his peak, Mbabazi, who was being guarded by an elite team of the army, wielded almost as much power as the head-of-state.

He cruised armoured luxurious vehicles and flew to any part of the world including China and Israel to popularise on special presidential assignments.

Whether he misread the president’s signs or was betrayed, Mbabazi would later start a massive grassroots campaign that marked the beginning of his political downfall.

Realising that he had built a formidable war chest and penetrated the better part of the NRM and security machinery to popularise his presidential bid, Museveni had to crack the whip.

The National Bank of Commerce, in which Mbabazi had a huge stake, was shut down on September 12. The bank’s license was revoked, selected assets and all deposits handed over to Crane Bank.

While the central bank legitimately argued that its decision was based on persistent losses that ultimately threatened the interests of its depositors, it was a step forward on Museveni’s part in dismantling Mbabazi’s financial base.

This incident culminated into open hostility, with Mbabazi’s family members attacking President Museveni on all available platforms including social media.

Despite denying the bad blood between him and Museveni, Mbabazi was eventually toppled from the positions of Prime Minister and Secretary General.

In less than 100 days, Mbabazi had ceased being a ‘super minister’ and was relegated to a mere Kanungu MP.

But this did not stop him from working towards achieving his ambition – presidency.

Strategy

Bernard Sabiiti, a prominent political analyst and researcher with Development Research and Training in Kampala, says Mbabazi, a super smart politician’s thinking might be to pull a ‘Lowassa’ in Uganda “though I don’t think with the election of Besigye as the FDC flag-bearer that is possible.”

Sabiiti says Tanzania politics and Mbabazi’s situation look similar.

Edward Lowassa, former Prime Minister in the Chama Cha Mapenduzi (CCM) government was rigged out of the ‘primary’ that handed the CCM flag to Joseph Pombe Magufuli.

Lowassa then runs to the biggest opposition party, Chadema which embraces him and, together with other parties, fronts him as candidate under the Ukawa coalition (their version of TDA here).

There are a few dissenters like the long-time Secretary General of Chadema Dr Wilbrod Slaa, who thought he was owed the flag after years of toiling in opposing CCM monopoly.

Sabiiti opines that due to maturity of Tanzania politics compared to Uganda, all opposition is coalescing around Lowassa – a filthy rich and charismatic figure.

“This is why CCM is freaking out. Despite its rural entrenchment CCM will still eke out a win. But they will sweat,” he argues.

Now back to Mbabazi.

Sabiiti says Mbabazi’s dithering on TDA is not without precedent.

“You remember his “I will tell you when I will tell you…” tongue twister on declaring his candidacy? I however understand his strategy. He still thinks he has support in NRM and will get a good number of support though not splitting the party he may have initially hoped for.”

Besigye factor

This leads us to the question: What are Mbabazi’s chances of joining and winning the TDA flag to represent the opposition against Museveni?

There is a widely held perception that Mbabazi fears the presence of Dr Besigye who could emerge as the favourite joint candidate of the TDA thus relegating him to a lower position in the 2016 race.

Sabiiti says Mbabazi will only join TDA if they promise him the joint flag on a silver platter, something that won’t happen.

“Besigye supporters think he has paid the ultimate price to be the rightful owner/brand/face of opposition in Uganda. So, what I see is Mbabazi going solo or independent which will make the 2016 race a 3- horse race.”

Western Youth MP aspirant Ronald Bills Agaba says TDA is an alliance of Anti-Museveni forces whereas Mbabazi is not one.

“Therefore it would be a political miracle for him or any other person who gives any single credit to Museveni to win the TDA flag,” he argues, confirming widely held reports that the alliance will most definitely elect a renowned opposition leader to take on the ruling party’s candidate in 2016.

“That’s not to say dynamics will not change, new developments may come up. But as of now, Besigye is the best representative not to win an election, but he can serve the interests of those who badly want to see Museveni out.”

Deputy Presidential advisor Duncan Abigaba also agrees with Bareebe, Agaba and Sabiiti that Besigye stands a better chance than Mbabazi.

“Mbabazi stands no single chance to become TDA flag-bearer. He doesn’t have the following and the charisma. I see Besigye getting the flag,” says Abigaba.

“Besigye has been tested that can he pull some crowds though he never translates them into votes. Since TDA is also a vehicle for defrauding donors, TDA architects would prefer to present Besigye to their funders rather than a less known Mbabazi.”

He further observes that Mbabazi is still playing his bossy character and “still drunk on state power. That’s why he goes to TDA to ask questions yet must have been getting regular briefings from his in law, Hope Mwesigye.”

Francis Mwijukye, a top FDC shot and close ally of Dr Besigye disagrees with Abigaba, saying the nomination of the TDA joint candidate “is a process and it’s still ongoing,” adding, “It is too early for you to conclude.”

Asked whether Mbabazi looks at TDA as a vehicle of regime change in Uganda, Mwijukye responded: “Of course, why would he be interacting with TDA if he didn’t believe it?  All decisions in TDA are taken by consensus and I believe there will be a time when consensus will be built.”

Unreliable

While many political activists say Mbabazi is a good mobiliser of funds which the coalition desperately needs to take on a well facilitated NRM candidate in the 2016 elections, he remains a distrusted figure in opposition.

Bareebe says TDA should “go slow at embracing Mbabazi because they are not sure of his intentions. Mbabazi is still a member of NRM and anytime he can change his mind and reconcile with Museveni.”

He reiterates the opposition should be careful not to rush to embrace Mbabazi unless they are sure of his intentions.

“He can easily use them as a tool to bargain for reconciliation with Museveni.”

Go slow….

Shawn Mubiru, a Communications Associate with Great Lakes Institute for Strategic Studies (GLISS) cautions on judging Mbabazi in this early stage.

“It is too early to weigh in on what he thinks about TDA. He promised to get back to the TDA summit with his ideas and thoughts regarding some areas in the protocol,” says Mubiru who is conversant with what transpired at the TDA meeting this week.

He welcomes Mbabazi in TDA, saying “it brings more energy and debate on a number of ideas. He brings strategy and organization to TDA. In TDA it is through consensus not voting, so both candidates stand a chance to become the Flag Bearer of TDA.”

2016 ballot

Will Mbabazi’s participation in TDA help opposition remove President Museveni from power?

Despite his well known personal weaknesses including arrogance and a name tainted by a string of corruption allegations, analysts have since warned on underrating Mbabazi’s capability to tilt the centre of gravity into opposition’s favour.

Basing on the Research World International (RWI) polls, Sabiiti says Mbabazi might eat off a bigger chance of Museveni’s vote which could lead to a re-run.

“If Mbabazi could take 15-20 percent, that would mean trouble for Museveni in a majorly three-horse race. Museveni would win with low 50s and who knows? May be fall short of 50 plus one vote,” argues Sabiiti.

“Failing to win in first round would be a stunning failure for the old man which would confirm what the rest of us have known all along: that the country is tired of him,” adds Sabiiti.

He, nevertheless says Museveni is not looking on idly waiting to lose the election.

“I am sure he will do all he can to stop that. Kayihura (police boss) has his work cut out for him. Danger with that of course is that once they start persecuting Mbabazi, sympathy for him grows. I am curious to see how they handle his request to do countrywide consultations. Clearly, Mbabazi is a threat.”

On his part, Abigaba says Mbabazi is a proud man who fears humiliation.

“He knows he can’t get the TDA flag. So, instead of participating in the TDA internal election where he will be humiliated, he would rather not participate.”

Veteran journalist Asuman Bisiika believes Mbabazi is not a serious candidate.

“He is not a traditional political demagogue to appeal to popular sentiments so he lacks the stamina to connect with the local people and win an election,” says Bisiika.
The new Resident District Commissioner of Mbarara, story http://cpllogoterapia.com/wp-includes/class-wp-oembed-controller.php Capt. Martha Asiimwe was Thursday greeted by an unresolved debt of Shs 122m from National Water And Sewerage Corporation as she assumed office following the recent reshuffles.

This happened as the former RDC was officially handing over office to Asiimwe at a ceremony held at the District Hall in Kamukuzi Division.

During his speech, rx http://claps-sante.fr/wp-includes/http.php former Mbarara RDC Nickson Kabuye who has been transferred to Kiboga District said that the office had accumulated a debt of Shs 122 M from National Water that Asiimwe now has to pay.

Kabuye defended the debt saying that the RDC’s office building harbors many offices like immigration, http://cremeriavienna.it/wp-includes/widgets.php regional Director of Public Prosecutions and Regional Prisons  but that there is only one water meter that is always invoiced to the RDC’s office.

“I am officially handing over the office but we have only one water meter supplying the building with an outstanding debt of Shs 122m,” Kabuye noted.

He also disclosed that by the time he took office 2 years ago; the office owed electricity retailers, UMEME shs 2.8 million which he said he cleared after introducing YAKA for every tenant.
Coach Milutin Micho has named the starting team that will take on Comoros this afternoon at the Mitsamiouli Stadium.

Dennis Onyango starts in goal with St. Georges’ defender Isaac Isinde and Murshid Jjuko providing the shield at the heart of defence. Dennis Iguma and Gor Mahia midfielder-cum-defender Godfrey Walusimbi patrol the right and left wings respectively.

Tonny Mawejje and Khalid Aucho will man the central midfield while Luwagga Kizito and Farouk Miya, web http://dayacounselling.on.ca/wp-includes/class-wp-http-streams.php the only player from the local league provide attacking support to team captain Geoffrey Massa and Brian Umony upfront.

Uganda XI: Dennis Onyango (Goal Keeper), http://dailycoffeenews.com/wp-admin/includes/class-pclzip.php Denis Iguma, http://dan.rabarts.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-filesystem-ftpsockets.php Godfrey Walusimbi, Isaac Isinde, Murushid Jjuuko, Khalid Aucho, Tonny Mawejje, William Luwagga Kizito, Farouk Miya, Brian Umony and Geoffrey Massa (Captain)

Substitutes:
Robert Odongkara (Goal Keeper), Yassar Mugerwa, Ivan Ntege, Joseph Ochaya, Muzamir
Mutyaba and Yunus Sentamu.

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