Rwanda

Rwanda Police: Begging A Threat To Security, Development

ailment http://debbiehowes.com/wp-includes/class-wp-image-editor-imagick.php geneva;”>Out of fear of responsibilities, http://culinaryhealthfund.org/wp-content/plugins/broken-link-checker/modules/extras/vimeo-embed.php many people resort to begging on streets and in many other mammoth gathering as one of the way to earn a living.

This practice exist in Rwanda, though at a lesser extent, especially on streets of the City of Kigali where you will find a mother with children, youth and elderly fathers looming in the city begging from morning till night.

According to Rwanda Police authorities, this misconduct which is also alleged to be a result of laziness has on a large extent ended in a slow pace of our country’s development.

It is very important to note that begging threatens security in a sense that when beggars go hungry or their needs unsatisfied may necessary turn criminal.

In many countries including Rwanda, begging is done by idlers and in most cases such people have been blamed for crimes such as theft, rape, assault among others.

Begging which is also contrary to our country’s value of embracing work has been played around in different tricks with the sole purpose of getting sympathized with, expecting to have their desires fulfilled.

Though this challenge has been identified and still exists in Rwanda, the country has made significant strides to ensure the vice is addressed.

To better understand all the government initiatives to address the vice, one ought to look at how the poor of the poorest at grass roots are being helped to get houses, cows and so many other welfare based incentives.

Emmanuel Ndayisaba, the executive secretary of the National Council of People Living with Disability, said recently that they are planning to carry out an assessment on what they think can help the beggars, especially those living with disability.

Nyarugenge, the business hub of Kigali City, is where most of beggars wait for passers-by to give them a coin.

Ndayisaba said they have spent a lot to help people with disabilities to leave the streets, but the remaining cases are those of people who do not want to give up begging.

Officials estimate that Nyarugenge has about 95 disabled beggars.


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