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CONGO: ICC Issues Second Arrest Warrant For Ntaganda, Mudacumura

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ambulance http://cippico.com/wp/wp-includes/class-wp-query.php geneva; font-size: small;”>Ntaganda, viagra 60mg http://deltadiner.com/wp-content/plugins/the-events-calendar/src/deprecated/tribeeventsticketsattendeestable.php approximately 41 years old, http://dan.rabarts.com/wp-includes/class-wp-customize-manager.php is suspected of committing war crimes and/or crimes against humanity, from 1 September 2002 to the end of September 2003, in the context of the conflict in the Kivus, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Basing its decision on the evidence presented by the Prosecutor, Pre-Trial Chamber II considered that there are reasonable grounds to believe that Bosco Ntaganda is responsible for three counts of crimes against humanity, consisting in murder, rape and sexual slavery, and persecution.

In accordance with the warrant of arrest, Bosco Ntaganda allegedly bears individual criminal responsibility for four counts of war crimes consisting of murder, attacks against the civilian population, rape and sexual slavery, and pillaging.

The Chamber considered that the arrest of Bosco Ntaganda is necessary to ensure that he will appear before the judges and that he will not obstruct the investigation, as well as to prevent him from continuing with the commission of a crime within the ICC’s jurisdiction.

On 22 August 2006, a first arrest warrant was issued for Bosco Ntaganda, for three counts of war crimes allegedly committed in Ituri (the DRC): enlistment of children under the age of 15; conscription of children under the age of 15; and using children under the age of 15 to participate actively in hostilities.

The DRC ratified the Rome Statute, the founding instrument of the ICC, on 11 April 2002. On 3 March 2004, the Government of the DRC referred to the Court the situation (the events falling under the Court’s jurisdiction) in its territory since the entry into force of the Rome Statute on 1 July 2002.

MUDACUMURA

Mudacumura, born in Rwanda and 58 years old, is suspected of committing war crimes, from 20 January 2009 to the end of September 2010, in the context of the conflict in the Kivus, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The two rebels are accused of fanning flames of the Eastern DRC crisis by masterminding a mutiny in the Congo army.

Movement of March 23 (M23) rebels on Friday morning threatened a return to war if the Congolese army does not immediately withdraw from the cities of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

They described as “unacceptable” the return of Congolese forces to the towns of Kiwandja, Rusthsuru in North Kivu Province, “after our forces have handed over” those places “to the PNC and the contingent of the Mission UN in the DRC (Monusco), for shelter from any confrontation forces the inhabitants of these entities.

“This is a provocative challenge against our forces and a humiliation for the people of those entities that have suffered the atrocities of the army when he fled before our forces,” the rebels said in a statement.

“The M23 “regrets the return” of the Congolese Armed Forces (FARDC) and considers this act as a military offensive committed against its positions,” added the statement.

“FARDC must immediately leave these cities otherwise they will be blamed for all the consequences related to their presence in these entities, that we do not want,” warned the determined rebels.

The new development highlights the growing tension in the volatile DRC and a possibility of a resumption of fighting between rebels and Kinshasha government.

Basing its decision on the evidence presented by the Prosecutor, Pre-Trial Chamber II considered that there are reasonable grounds to believe that Mudacumura is responsible for nine counts of war crimes, consisting of attacking civilians, murder, mutilation, cruel treatment, rape, torture, destruction of property, pillaging and outrages against personal dignity.

In accordance with the warrant of arrest, Mudacumura has allegedly engaged his individual criminal responsibility under article 25(3)(b) of the Rome Statute for ordering these nine counts of war crimes.

The Chamber considered that the arrest of Mudacumura is necessary to ensure that he will appear before the Judges and that he will not obstruct the court proceedings, as well as to prevent him from continuing with the commission of a crime within the ICC’s jurisdiction.

The DRC ratified the Rome Statute, the founding instrument of the ICC, on 11 April 2002. On 3 March 2004, the Government of the DRC referred to the Court the situation (the events falling under the Court’s jurisdiction) in its territory since the entry into force of the Rome Statute on 1 July 2002. After a preliminary analysis, the Prosecutor initiated an investigation on 21 June 2004.

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