Crime & Investigation

Police, Civil Society Join Hands to End Violence

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The US military will begin treatment for national security document leaker Chelsea Manning for her gender-identity condition.

The crusade is entailed in the continuing activities being held to mark the Police Force’s 100 years of existence which will be crowed at the grand celebration on October 3 at Kololo Independence grounds.

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In the new campaign, hospital Police have partnered with civil society organizations to publish thousands of stickers that will be placed on all Police vehicles and spread across the country with anti-GBV massages in four different locals’ dialects.

Speaking yesterday at the launch of the campaign in Kampala, http://choladathaicuisine.com/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/after-the-deadline.php ACP Christine Alaro who heads the the Child and Family Protection Department told of how the force was continuing to grapple with GBV cases, which are currently the most reported.

Last year, close to 10,000 cases of defilement alone were recorded, and over 300 murders emerging from gender and family related violence.

Studies have shown that over 56% of all Ugandan families have experienced gender based violence, with women and children being the most victimized.

“Our officers who are down in the communities have witnessed some of the worst violence lately. The pain inflicted on victims is immense, the trauma is tangible, and worst of all is that perpetrators are not strangers but people who are closest to the victims,” she said.

At the event, Mrs Tina Musuya who heads the Center for Domestic Violence Prevention (CEDUVIP), called for police’s increased vigilance, response mechanism but most importantly prevention of these cases.

“All we need now is the assurance of safety at all times. GBV has inflicted on our girls a lot of pain, poor health, we are seeing a lot of family breakdowns, school dropouts, delinquent behavior and deaths; Something different needs to be done.”

Meanwhile Musuya called upon Ugandans to embrace the new Domestic Violence Act 2010 which she said is being wrongly bedeviled as a key cause of family breakups.

“What breaks families are the irreconcilable differences due to the impossible behaviors of some family members? People should know that as a civilized society we must have laws to follow,” she said.

Men who are experience domestic violence like being battered by their wives were also advised to make use of the legislation and to seek help from police, rather than suffering in silence for fear of shame.

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