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Civil Society Plot Legal Action Against New Budget

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healing http://chipinhead.com/wp-admin/includes/class-wp-media-list-table.php geneva; font-size: small; line-height: 150%;”>The 15 trillion budget attracted outrage from mainly civil society, cialis 40mg http://dchnf.dk/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/includes/class-wc-shipping-rate.php opposition political parties and economists as it was deemed largely anti-poor.

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A coalition of civil society bodies which have been keenly tracking this year’s budget formulation have added their voice to the widespread disparagement.

The Civil Society Budget Advocacy Group (CSBAG) noted in a statement on Saturday that the budget was designed to help only a small section of the population.

“From the budget proposals, particularly on taxation, it is rather evident that Ugandans are either being taken for a ride, or we are increasingly seeing a budget for the few at the expense of the majority Ugandans,” noted CSBAG Director of Programs Julius Kapwepwe.

“How else do we account for tax imposition on salt, sugar, agricultural machinery, etc? It is possible that Hon. Maria Kiwanuka read a wrong budget speech or she wasn’t serious?”

The Thursday budget introduced fresh taxation on among others, kerosene, motor fuel, private schools, ICT equipment, sugar, salt, and commercial agricultural equipment.

CSBAG further observed that the budget reflected less of what president Yoweri Museveni had promised a week earlier in the State of the Nation Address about prioritization of agriculture.

The body is now exploring a number of steps to take against the proposed budget among which includes legal action through the Uganda Law Society which is part of the group.

Noting that civil society would not lie helpless, Mr Kapwepwe also highlighted other possible options like mobilizing citizens for civic actions, or taking on Public interest litigation against some components of the proposed budget.

“I think we need to look beyond mere public sensitization about the budget, pros and cons. Are we able to go beyond this? When shall the ordinary citizens in this country be listened to?,” wondered Kapwepwe.

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