Kenya

ICC Blasts Kenya's Exit

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drug visit this site http://channelingerik.com/wp-includes/rewrite.php geneva; font-size: small; line-height: 200%;”>Ambassador Tiina Intelmann, check search http://centreduplateau.qc.ca/wp-includes/update.php the Court’s Assembly of State parties’ president told press at the ICC headquarters in Kampala on Tuesday that while Kenya was at liberty to opt out of the ICC, search remedy the decision wasn’t the right choice at the time.

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“I really hope they don’t. I hope that Kenya actually remains in the Rome Statute and continues to contribute to the fight against impunity which is the common endeavor of all states,” she said.

The East African nation on Thursday last week shocked the world when, in an emergency debate, parliament moved a motion to “suspend any linkages, cooperation and assistance to the ICC.”

The motion, though boycotted by opposition, was overwhelmingly supported by the house, and a bill is subsequently expected to be tabled early next month to this effect.

Tiina was also cognizant of the fact that Kenya’s departure may have a contagious effect amongst other member states.

“It’s true that this withdrawal may trigger other countries opting out. But I would like to reiterate that there is currently no better mechanism to ensure international justice at our disposal, other than the ICC.”

Many Kenyan politicians have branded the court as a neo-colonial institution that only targets African leaders, ignoring those in western first world countries who have been implicated in similar or worse cases. Indeed all 8 cases being handled at the court are from African countries.

Ambassador Tinna however reiterated that this was because most of the cases against African leaders were being referred to the Court by Africans themselves, and not western countries.

“We are not going after any country or any individual. That is a false allegation,” she said.

“Indeed there have been attempts to have local authorities take on criminal justice processes against the perpetrators domestically including in Kenya. But unfortunately, most of these countries have demonstrated lack of sufficient criminal justice systems and structures to do so.”

A related assertion was made on Tuesday by ICC Chief prosecutor Mrs Fatou Bensouda during the first hearing of the case against Kenya’s vice president William Ruto, co accused with President Uhuru Kenyatta and journalist Jushua Arap Sang for crimes against humanity that saw about 1100 Kenyans people killed and over 60,000 displaced in the wake of the 2007 post presidential elections violence.

“It’s not that [the court] is meddling interventions in matters of a sovereign country. It is about getting justice and ensuring no impunity of responsible perpetrators, regardless of their power or status,” she said.

President Uhuru’s hearing is set for November this year and is expected to run to December 13th, a day after Kenya marks 50 years of independence.

While he has expressed willingness to cooperate, the court’s timetable provisions have sparked criticism amongst natives questioning how the president and the vice president can be out of the country while it celebrates it golden jubilee.

“The day we shall cerebrate the Jamhuri day with Kenyatta at The Hague, is the day Kenya will have lost its sovereignty,” said Prof. Peter Kangwala, president of the African Policy Institute.

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