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Kampala Traders Call Off Strike

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click http://chancellorinsja.com/wp-includes/class-walker-comment.php geneva; font-size: small; line-height: 115%;”>The programme emphasises pre-shipment inspection of imported goods in the countries of origin before they enter into the Ugandan market which Trade Minister, pharmacy http://csnn.ca/wp-includes/class-wp-list-util.php Amelia Kyambadde, sickness said would help stop counterfeit products from flooding the Ugandan market.

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The traders on Tuesday closed their shops in protest against the PIVoC, saying it came with “exploitative taxes.”

In a joint press briefing at the Uganda Media Centre on Saturday morning, Kampala City Traders Association (KACITA) boss, Everest Kayondo said they had decided to lift their strike pending further negotiations with government.

Kyambadde said it was observed that the PIVoC was not known to all stakeholders and therefore some importers did not pay the inspection fee.

“In the interest of the trading community, consumers and all Ugandans; the trading community should resume normal business,” said Kyambadde.

She further noted that a joint committee meeting had been set up to address loopholes in the PIVoC contract and addresses all stakeholder concerns.

Chaired by Premier Amama Mbabazi, the meeting would today Saturday finalise government’s position for negotiations with service providers.

Kyambadde said a meeting with KACITA and other stakeholders agreed that PIVoC is important to ensure products meet standards for the health and safety of Ugandan consumers.

The development marks a significant step in addressing traders’ grievances and putting an end to a five-day strike that had seen government lose billions of shillings as thousands of traders closed their businesses.

Kyambadde, however, said goods imported in the month of June that don’t have certificates shall be inspected by Uganda National Bureau of Standards and exempted from the 15 percent penalty.

Earlier, government said the policy was also meant to protect consumers from sub-standard goods and allow value for money and protect local producers from unfair competition arising from cheap substandard products in the market.

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